• 寄生生物との戦いを通じて生命の意味に迫る

    [From Decemberber Issue 2014]

    Parasyte
    This manga depicts a fight against mysterious creatures that have infiltrated human society. After being serialized in 1989 in special editions of Morning Open, it was then run in Monthly Afternoon from 1990 to 1995. Translations have been published in other countries, making Parasyte well regarded both within and outside Japan. An animated TV series went on air in October 2014 and the first live action film adaptation will be released in November.
    The story begins with a voiceover narrated by an unknown person: “This thought popped into the head of someone on Earth: ‘If the human population shrank to half its size, how many forests would be left unscathed?’”
    They came from the sky one night. Eggs rained down all over the world, hatched, and leech-shaped creatures entered human bodies through their noses and earholes. By latching onto the brain, they control the whole body, and acting on instinct, feed on other human bodies through their host. By utilizing their heightened learning abilities, they learn to speak and infiltrate human society.
    IZUMI Shinichi is attacked by a parasyte, but, because it entered his body through his right hand, he manages to keep it from reaching his brain. It does, however, manage to take over Shinichi’s right arm. So Shinichi has no other choice but to live with the parasyte. That right hand calls itself Migi “because it’s a migite” (right hand in Japanese).
    Meanwhile, murders carried out by parasytes begin to occur. Confronted by reports of cruel crimes involving devoured bodies, Shinichi wonders whether he should reveal the truth. But Migi won’t allow it, insisting that its safety and Shinichi’s must come first. The parasytes continue to catch and devour more and more humans until one day, Shinichi is stabbed in the heart when his own mother becomes host to a parasyte. Migi saves him, but his mother dies and this takes a huge toll on him both mentally and physically.
    Eventually humans discover that the parasytes are behind these incidents and the battle between parasytes and humans begins. People sometimes suspect that Shinichi has been taken over by a parasyte, and, after encountering different kinds of parasytes and humans, he himself is unsure where his loyalties lie. Uncertain whether they are mankind’s enemies, he becomes reluctant to kill parasytes.
    Is it a crime for the parasytes to prey on humans? If so, isn’t it also a crime for humans to kill and eat other creatures? Isn’t there any way for parasytes and humans to coexist? Asked these questions, time and again by parasytes and humans, Shinichi naturally ponders this dilemma himself. Shinichi witnesses the suffering of both humans and parasytes, until the true enemy finally appears; the conclusion Shinichi finally comes to is a massive shock. The Japanese title “Kiseiju,” which means parasitic beast, contains a message that crosses generations.
    Text: HATTA Emiko[2014年12月号掲載記事]

    寄生獣
    人間社会に紛れ込んだ謎の生物との戦いを描いた作品。モーニングオープン増刊にて1989年に連載された後、月刊アフタヌーンにて1990~1995年まで連載されました。国内外ともに評価が高く、外国でも翻訳本が出版されています。2014年10月からテレビアニメが放映され、11月には実写映画の第1弾が公開されます。
    物語は、誰が言ったともわからないナレーションから始まります。「地球上の誰かがふと思った。『人間の数が半分になったら いくつの森が焼かれずにすむだろうか……』」。
    ある夜、彼らは空から訪れました。世界中に降り注いだ卵から生まれた生物は、ヒルのような形状で鼻や耳の穴から侵入します。そして脳に寄生して全身を支配し、その人物を通じて人間を食糧とする性質を持っています。そして、高い学習能力を活かして言語を習得し、社会に紛れ込んでいきます。
    泉新一はパラサイトに襲われますが、右手からもぐり込まれたため、頭部に至る前に食い止めることができました。ところがパラサイトは新一の右手に寄生してしまいます。新一はパラサイトと共に生活せざるを得なくなります。右手は「右手だから」という理由からミギーと名乗ります。
    一方、寄生したパラサイトによる殺人事件が起こり始めます。体を食い荒らす残酷な犯行が報道され、新一は事態の真相を明らかにするべきではないかと悩みます。ミギーは自分と新一の安全が優先だと主張し、それを許しません。パラサイトによる捕食は広がり続けます。新一の母親も寄生され、新一は心臓を貫かれます。ミギーに助けられますが、母親は死に、心身に大きな傷を負いました。
    やがて人間側が事件の背後にいるパラサイトの存在に気づき、人間対パラサイトの戦いになっていきます。時に人間からパラサイトと疑われながら、新たな人々やパラサイトとの出会いを経験し、新一の心は揺れ動きます。パラサイトを人間の敵として殺すことをためらうようになるのです。
    パラサイトが人間を捕食するのは罪なのか。もしそうならば他の生物を殺して食う人間も同罪ではないのか。彼らが共生する道はないのか。新一は、パラサイトからも人間からも繰り返しそう問われ、自らにも問いかけます。両者のはざまで苦しむ新一の前に、最終的に現れる敵の姿と、新一が導いた結論は、大きな衝撃を与えます。タイトルの「寄生獣」が意味する言葉と共に、時代を超えたメッセージを投げかけています。
    文:服田恵美子

    Read More
  • 冬の風物詩となったイルミネーション

    [From Decemberber Issue 2014]

    Every year from around November to December, many commercial complexes and municipalities turn on their spectacular illuminations. These brilliant displays get people in the mood for Christmas. The switch-on ceremonies held at large commercial complexes are featured in the news and have become an annual winter attraction.
    During this period, 5.6 million people visit the illuminations at Tokyo Midtown. This year is the eighth time the display has been held and its theme is a journey from the earth into space. It’s a yearly tradition for a pool of blue LED light to be created in the 2,000 square meter Grass Square. This year four meter high light sticks are installed there. This creates the feeling of being in a zero gravity environment. Illuminated by a total of 500,000 LED bulbs, until December 25, the commercial complex is transformed into a luminous space.
    Founded in 1995, Kobe Luminarie was the first light display to become well known in Japan. The Great Hanshin Earthquake had occurred in January that year. And the Kobe Luminarie was organized to put its victims’ souls to rest and to pray for the restoration and rehabilitation of Kobe.
    There was a great demand for it to become a regular event and citizens, business owners and visitors have contributed every year so that it can been held. This year marks the 20th year since the Great Hanshin Earthquake. The event ensures that the quake will never be forgotten by future generations, and this year it will run from December 4 to 15.
    There are some cases where light displays have been instrumental in attracting more visitors to a particular locale. Ashikaga Flower Park in Tochigi Prefecture is known for its giant 150-year-old wisteria and 80-meter-long wisteria tunnel. Between mid-April and mid-May when the wisteria flowers are in bloom, 50,000 people visit each day. Because the park was well known for its flowers, the management was concerned with the question of how to attract visitors during wintertime.
    Because of this, they installed illuminations in 2002, and since then, the number of visitors gradually increased until last year 500,000 came during that period. This year, 2.5 million electric bulbs are being used over a 92,000 square meter area. Images of birds flying across the night sky can be enjoyed on organic electroluminescent panels which change depending on the angle they are viewed from. Special opening hours and admission prices are in effect until February 5 for those who come only for the illuminations.
    The illuminations at Decks Tokyo Beach in Odaiba, Tokyo, have been revamped this year. To attract more visitors they will be switched on all year round. One of the new attractions is a tunnel that projects different images onto its walls depending on the motion it detects from people inside it. A large heart-shaped light display has been installed at this spot where it is possible to take photos that include Tokyo Tower, Tokyo Sky Tree and Rainbow Bridge, all in one shot.

    Text: ICHIMURA Masayo

    [2014年12月号掲載記事]

    毎年11月頃から12月にかけて、多くの商業施設や自治体が趣向を凝らしたイルミネーションを点灯します。華やかな雰囲気は、クリスマスに向けて気分を盛り上げます。大きな施設では点灯式がニュースになるほどで、冬の風物詩となっています。

    開催時期には約560万人が訪れるのが東京ミッドタウンです。8回目を迎える今年のテーマは地球から宇宙への旅です。毎年約2千平方メートルの庭に青いLEDの光をしきつめています。今年はその中に最大4メートルのスティックイルミネーションを設置。無重力空間にいるかのような印象を与えます。施設内は合計50万個のLEDで彩られ、12月25日まで光の空間となります。

    イルミネーションでいち早く知られるようになったのは、1995年に始まった神戸ルミナリエです。この年の1月、阪神・淡路大震災が起きました。神戸ルミナリエはその犠牲者の鎮魂のため、また神戸の復興と再生の希望を託して催されました。

    その後も続けてほしいとの声が多く、毎年市民や事業者、来場者の寄付によって実施されています。今年は阪神・淡路大震災から20年の節目の年です。震災の記憶を後世に伝えていく行事として12月4日から15日まで開催されます。

    イルミネーションによって、来訪者を増やすことに成功した例もあります。栃木県にあるあしかがフラワーパークは樹齢約150年の大藤や、80メートル続く藤のトンネルで知られています。藤の花が見頃となる4月中旬から5月中旬には、一日5万人が訪れます。花で知られている公園のため、管理者は冬の集客には悩んでいました。

    そこで2002年にイルミネーションを設置したところ、来客数が徐々に増え、昨年は期間中に約50万人が訪れました。今年は9万2千平方メートルの敷地に250万個の電飾を使用。見る角度によって色が変わる有機ELパネルを使い、夜空に鳥が飛んでいるような演出などが楽しめます。2015年2月5日までイルミネーションだけを見に来る人のために特別な開園時間と入園料を設けています。

    今年リニューアルしたのが東京・お台場にあるデックス東京ビーチのイルミネーションです。集客を狙って通年点灯します。人の動きを感知して映像を壁に投影するトンネルが登場しました。東京タワー、東京スカイツリー、レインボーブリッジを一度に撮影できるポイントにハート型のディスプレイが設置されています。

    文:市村雅代

    Read More
  • 日本について話すたびに日本を好きに

    [From Novemberber Issue 2014]

    Karine LIEBAUT,
    Wife of the Belgian Ambassador to Japan
    My husband came to Japan on the 16th of March, 2011, five days after the East Japan earthquake, because he felt that it was then that it would provide moral support to the Belgian community in Japan. For practical reasons I came to Japan one month later, in April. It was terrible to come at that time and see what had happened. I had never experienced an earthquake and there were still aftershocks, but I got used to it gradually.
    Language is the only problem for me in daily life in Japan. The transportation system is very organized. Once you have your PASMO (IC card), a plan of the metro and know all the lines, it’s no problem. In the stations, there’s always somebody who can help you. They speak a little bit of English and know enough to explain to you which train to take. Shopping is not a problem. In the supermarket, sometimes, the lack of English is sometimes a little difficult. But many times, Japanese people understand what we are asking.
    Regarding Japanese people, a lot of people might think that Japanese people are very reserved. It’s true, but they are also very open. I can talk to my Japanese friends about anything. It’s not like they are holding things back, so for me, this is an aspect I haven’t experienced.
    Then there’s the civic sense of Japanese people. In Japan, there is a huge respect for everything: for people, society, rules, and for things in general. They show respect for other people by not throwing litter on the floor, thus keeping the environment clean. This is something we’ve lost in Europe.

    Christmas in Brussels © www.milo-profi.be/Visit Flanders

    Christmas in Brussels
    © www.milo-profi.be/Visit Flanders

    I would say that one thing Japan could learn from us is how to have a more relaxed atmosphere in schools: the schools children go to here are too strict. In Europe, it’s a little bit more relaxed.
    I certainly think that the security in Japan is wonderful. In the West, in some parts of our major cities, there is a growing feeling of insecurity. Here, I feel there is 100% security. I think this comes from having a respectful attitude to others.
    In Belgium people are very nice. They like to go out, they enjoy life, and they’re hospitable. I think we’re generous. We don’t open our doors right away, but once we know people, we’re very open. As we speak two or three languages, this facilitates communication with other cultures.

    201411-1-3

    Historic buildings overlook the river in Ghent
    © Joost Joossen

    The center of our cities have beautiful terraces and museums. When you think of the Flemish artists, some of the best artists in the world come to mind. We excel at modern art and modern dance.
    We are a very creative country. We have good architects and beautiful modern design. So for a small country with 11 and a half million inhabitants, we really have a lot to offer. Also, in certain respects, we have two cultures: part Flemish and part French. These two cultures make the country richer.
    Home to the EU, NATO and numerous embassies, Brussels is an international city. You can hear a wonderful mix of languages in Brussels, Swedish, Spanish, Italian, as well as French and Dutch. This creates an international atmosphere. It has a very international cultural life because there are plays in Dutch, English, and French. All movies are shown as soon as they’re released. Food is one of the Belgium’s top attractions.
    The housing is very beautiful. You can live in a wonderful villa just outside of Brussels and commute every day. It’s a small country so we can go to Germany, France, and Holland. Paris is just one hour, 20 minutes by train. People can travel all over. One problem in Belgium is the traffic. A lot of trucks pass through the country in transit.

    201411-1-4

    The Great Market Square of Antwerp
    © Antwerp Tourism & Congres

    We have a lot of nice little cities. Of course Bruges, which is like walking through a museum. I think a lot of Japanese people don’t know Ghent; a city not far from Bruges and Brussels. This university city, where I studied, is very lively. It has canals, beautiful houses and paintings.
    Antwerp is beautiful with its cathedrals, and the house of Rubens. Antwerp has a different mindset from other cities; because it has always been an important port, people are a bit more cosmopolitan and open.
    The south of Belgium is the French speaking part. Namur is a beautiful little city. It is hilly and very green. The food is great; you can eat game in small restaurants in season. It’s nice to do sports and hunting there.
    The coastline and the sea are beautiful. It’s a grey sea with white beaches. There, you can cycle. A lot of apartments have been constructed along the coastline. I think all Belgians are especially fond of the coast, because it’s where many people spend their summer holidays.
    In the end, I realize how much I love Japan when I talk about it. I take lessons in ikebana and sumi-e. I like flower arranging myself, so I enjoy going to the flower shop and making my own arrangements for the house. I hope Japanese people appreciate what a wonderful country they have.
    Photos courtesy of Tourist Office for Flanders & Brussels, Belgium
    Interview:TONEGAWA Masanori[2014年11月号掲載記事]

    カリーヌ・リーバウトさん
    ベルギー駐日大使夫人
    主人が来日したのは、東日本大震災の5日後の2011年3月16日でした。在日ベルギー人にとって自分が必要とされていると感じたからです。私は事情があり、4月に来日しました。あのときに来て、起きたことを目にするのは恐ろしいことでした。私はそれまで地震を体験したことがありませんでした。余震はまだありましたが、徐々に慣れました。
    日本の日常生活では唯一の問題は言葉です。交通システムはとても機能的です。PASMO(ICカード)を持ち、行先と路線を知っていれば問題はありません。駅ではいつでも誰かが助けてくれます。英語はあまり話せませんが、どの電車に乗るのかを説明することはできます。買物も問題ないです。スーパーでは英語が通じないことがありますが、多くの場合、何を聞いているのかわかってくれます。
    日本人については、多くの人が日本人はとてもひかえめだと思っているようです。それは本当ですが、日本人はとてもオープンでもあります。日本人の友達には何でも話せます。私に隠し事をするようなことはなく、これは私にとって新しい体験です。
    それから、日本人の市民感覚があります。日本では人、社会、規則、全体のすべてを尊重します。他人を思いやり、床にごみを捨てずに清潔に環境を保ちます。このようなことはヨーロッパでは失われてしまいました。

    日本が私たちから学んでほしいことが一つあります。学校の環境をもっと気軽なものにしてはどうでしょうか。生徒に厳しすぎます。ヨーロッパではもう少しリラックスしています。
    日本の治安は本当にすばらしいと思います。西洋は安全ではなくなりました。日本は100%安全です。これは他者を尊重する姿勢から来ていると思います。
    ベルギーに関しては、人はとても親切です。外出が好きで、人生を楽しみ、人をもてなし、寛大だと思います。私たちはすぐには開放的になれませんが、一度知り合うと、とてもオープンになります。私たちは2~3ヵ国語を話すので、他の文化とのコミュニケーションは容易にできます。
    都市の中心部には美しいオープンテラスと美術館があります。フランダースの芸術家といえば、世界でもトップクラスの何人かが思い浮かびます。ベルギーは近代アート、近代ダンスがすばらしいです。

    ベルギーはとても創造的な国です。すばらしい建築物や美しい近代デザインもあります。人口1,150万人の小さな国ですが、提供できるものがたくさんあります。また、フラマン語系とフランス語系の二つの文化があるとも言えます。この二つの文化がベルギーを豊かにしています。
    ブリュッセルはEUとNATOの本拠地で、たくさんの大使館がある国際都市です。フランス語やオランダ語の他、スウェーデン語、スペイン語、イタリア語などさまざまな言語を耳にします。言語が国際的な雰囲気をかもしだしています。オランダ語、英語、フランス語の演劇もあり国際的な文化生活が楽しめます。映画がリリースされると、すぐに上映されます。食べ物はベルギーで最高のアトラクションの一つです。
    家屋はとてもきれいです。ブリュッセル近郊のすばらしい住宅に住み、毎日通勤できます。小さな国なので、ドイツ、フランス、オランダへ行くことができます。パリへは電車でちょうど1時間20分です。市民はどこにでも行くことができます。ベルギーの問題は交通です。たくさんのトラックが私たちの国を通過していきます。

    素敵な小さな街もたくさんあります。博物館の中を散歩しているような街、ブルージュは言うまでもありません。ゲントを知っている日本人は少ないと思います。ブルージュやブリュッセルにほど近いところにあります。私が学んだこの大学都市は活気に満ちています。運河や美しい家々と絵画があります。
    アントワープは大聖堂やルーベンスの家がある美しい街です。アントワープには他の街とは違う気質があります。重要な港でありつづけたことから、みな国際的で、内陸の人々より開放的です。
    ベルギーの南部ではフランス語を話します。ナムールは丘陵と緑が美しい小さな街です。食べ物は最高です。季節により小さなレストランでも狩猟の肉を食べることもできます。ここではスポーツやハンティングが楽しめます。
    海岸線や海はきれいです。白浜とグレーの海。そこではサイクリングができます。海岸線に沿ってたくさんのマンションが建てられています。ベルギー人はみんな海岸が大好きだと思います。そこで夏休みを過ごす人はたくさんいます。
    最後に、私は日本について話すたびに日本が好きだと実感します。私は生け花と墨絵のレッスンを受けています。自分で花を生けることが好きなので、花屋へ行くことや自分で生けた花を家に飾るのが楽しみです。日本の皆さんは自分の国のすばらしさに感謝してほしいと思います。
    写真提供:ベルギー・フランダース政府観光局
    インタビュー:利根川正則

    Read More
  • 女性がDIYにはまる理由

    [From Novemberber Issue 2014]

    These days, more and more women are taking up DIY as a hobby. DIY is an abbreviation of “Do it yourself”, but is often translated into Japanese as weekend carpentry. Compulsory “technology/home economics” classes in junior high school were once taught separately according to gender; with boys learning “technology” which included woodwork and engineering, and girls learning “home economics,” which included cooking and sewing. People therefore have an image of weekend carpentry as being a male hobby.
    Tools used for DIY are quite different from those in the past. Home centers have lots of safe and convenient tools such as compact saws and lightweight electric screwdrivers. They have become such familiar objects that even 100-yen shops have DIY sections. Tools made especially for women are on the market, including pastel-colored tool boxes and hammers with flower patterns on the handle.
    The “DIY Joshi-bu®” is a social circle for women actively involved in DIY. Since its foundation in March 2011, the number of members has been increasing every year and they now have over 1,800 people registered. Besides its Tokyo headquarters, there are three workshops in Japan and one overseas – these have become places for DIY-loving women to communicate. Lectures are given there on such topics such as how to make things and how to use tools.
    Vice President MUTA Yukiko says, “The appeal of DIY lies in the fact that you can create a finished product with a size and appearance that suits your own tastes. Since women almost invariably add some cute touch to the basic form, their personality will show in the product.”
    The “DIY Joshi-bu®” has a good reputation for the quality of its work, so they sometimes get commissions from companies. “As consumers, we make products that we really want, from the point of view of businesses this allows them to target the needs of today’s era and develop products. Truly excellent products become essential to the user’s life. In the future, we’d like to help create (more) workshops and environments where anyone can enjoy DIY without traveling far. We’d like to provide social support not only for women, but also for the elderly and children so that through DIY they can get a taste for the enjoyment of creating things and gain a sense of accomplishment,” says Muta.
    ISHII Akane, a housewife living in Saitama Prefecture got started with DIY when she decided to make a piece of furniture because it was too expensive to buy. She’s now reconstructing everything in her house – not only the furniture – to her taste, remaking interior doors in an antique style and changing the wallpaper to patterns of her liking.
    Ishii says, “I often use books on interior design and homes in other countries as a reference. Rather than making simply functional shelves or tables, women want to find beauty in them. DIY is a way of realizing your ideals.”

    Text: MUKAI Natsuko[2014年11月号掲載記事]

    近頃DIYを趣味とする女性が増えています。DIYとは「Do it yourself」の略ですが、日本ではしばしば日曜大工と訳されます。中学校の必修教科である「技術・家庭」は、かつて、木工や機械などの「技術」は男子、食物や被服などの「家庭」は女子というように男女別々に学んでいました。そのため日曜大工は男性の趣味というイメージがあります。
    今日DIYで使われる工具は、昔とはずいぶん変わりました。ホームセンターにはコンパクトなノコギリやハンディータイプの電動ドライバーなど、安全で便利な工具がたくさんあります。また100円ショップにもDIYコーナーができるほど身近なものとなりました。パステルカラーの道具箱や、柄の部分に花模様が描かれたかなづちなど、女性向きの工具も発売されています。
    「DIY女子部®」はDIY活動をする女性向けのサークルです。2011年3月にできてから会員数は年々増え続け、現在、その数は1,800名以上です。東京本部の他、国内3ヵ所、海外1ヵ所に工房があり、DIYが好きな女性たちのコミュニケーションの場となっています。そこでは作品製作や工具の使い方講座などが開催されています。
    副代表の牟田由紀子さんは話します。「DIYの魅力は、仕上がりのサイズやイメージを自分好みにできることです。女性は必ずといっていいほど、基本の形にかわいらしくアレンジを加えるので、作品には本人の個性が出ます」。
    品質の良さからDIY女子部®の評判は高く、企業から製作を依頼されることがあります。「消費者である私たちが本当にほしいものを製品化するため、企業側は今の時代のニーズに合ったターゲット戦略や商品開発ができます。本当に良いものは、生活の中で重宝されます。今後は、誰でも身近にDIYを楽しめる工房や環境づくりをしていきたいです。女性だけではなく社会支援として高齢者や子どもたちにもDIYを通してものづくりの楽しさや達成感を味わってもらいたいです」と牟田さんは話します。
    埼玉県に住む主婦の石井アカネさんは、ほしかった家具が高価だったので自分で作ろうと思ったのがきっかけでDIYを始めました。今では、家具だけではなく室内ドアをアンティーク調に作り替えたり、壁紙を好きな柄に張り替えたりするなど、家中を自分好みにアレンジしています。
    石井さんは話します。「インテリアの本や外国の住居もよく参考にしています。利便性のためだけに棚やテーブルを作るのではなく、女性はそこに見た目の美しさを求めます。DIYは自分の理想を叶える手段のひとつです」と話します。

    文:向井奈津子

    Read More
  • ロリータファッションでまちおこし

    [From Novemberber Issue 2014]

    The city of Otaru in Hokkaido is known for its beautiful streets. A new type of tourism event called the “Otaru Kawaii Tea Party” was created there. Aimed at fans of Lolita fashion, it’s been held since last year.
    Lolita fashion is about clothing with frills and lace attached that resembles the outfits once worn by modern Western women. Young women started up the Lolita fashion trend, which is characterized by its antique design. As part of Japanese pop culture, it’s been gaining fans around the world.
    In 2012, a contest was held in Sapporo City for business ideas that might revitalize the city. The winner was a plan to make use of the Lolita fashion trend. Lolita fashion goes well with the historical cityscape of Otaru. Putting this idea into practice, a decision was made for the city of Otaru and the local tourism association to host events.
    This year, 73 people took part. They strolled along a canal and through old streets, all the while enjoying photo opportunities. A fashion show – eating cakes and so forth – took place at a nearby stone warehouse which had been repurposed as a live music hall. Many participants expressed a wish that the event would continue in the future. The participants weren’t only young Japanese women; men and foreigners also took part.
    “Many people told me they were happy there was a new place to enjoy Lolita fashion,” says MITSUHASHI Asako, head of the Lolita fashion brand “Kita Loli,” which helped to organize the event. Otaru City’s aim is to spread awareness of Otaru’s scenery alongside Lolita fashion. With this in mind, they’re hoping to spark the interest of many other kinds of people.
    “Just as people try on maiko (trainee geisha) costumes when they go to Kyoto, I’d like people to try on Lolita outfits when they come to Otaru. I’d like to firmly establish it as part of our interactive tourism,” says NAKANO Hiroaki of the Sightseeing Promotion Room of Otaru City. In the city hopes have been raised that Otaru’s sweets and fashion will also be promoted.
    These days, there are more and more inquiries not only from domestic media, but also from Chinese media and French media. In Hong Kong, too, more people are paying attention to Lolita fashion. Hokkaido is already a popular tourist spot with South East Asians. In the future, Lolita fashion may end up becoming one of Hokkaido’s tourist attractions.

    Text: TSUCHIYA Emi

    [2014年11月号掲載記事]

     

    北海道小樽市は、美しい街並みで知られています。ここで、新しい形の観光イベント「小樽kawaiiティーパーティー」が生まれました。ロリータファッションのファンを対象に昨年から行われています。

    ロリータファッションとは、かつて近代西洋の女性が着ていたようなフリルやレースがついた服のことです。古風なデザインが特徴で、若い日本人女性の間で始まりました。日本のポップカルチャーの一つとして、世界中にファンが増えています。

    2012年に札幌でまちおこしのためのビジネスコンテストが開催されました。優勝したのがロリータファッションを活用した企画です。ロリータファッションは小樽の歴史的なまちに合います。小樽市や観光協会などがこのアイディアを使ったイベントを実施することになりました。

    今年は73人が参加。写真撮影を楽しみながら運河沿いや古い街並みを散策しました。その後は近くのレンガ造り倉庫を利用したライブハウスで行われるファッションショーを見ながらケーキなどを食べます。参加者からは今後も開催してほしいという要望が多くよせられました。若い女性だけでなく男性や外国人の参加者もいます。

    「ロリータファッションを楽しめる場ができてうれしかったとの声が多かったです」。イベントの開催に協力したロリータファッションブランド「北ロリ」の代表、三橋朝琴さんは言います。小樽市の狙いは、ロリータファッションとともに小樽の景観が広く紹介されることです。そのため、たくさんの人に興味をもってほしいと考えています。

    「京都へ行ったときに舞妓の衣装を着てみるのと同じ様に、小樽へ来たときにはロリータの衣装を体験してもらいたいのです。今後は体験観光の一つとして定着させたいです」と小樽市観光振興室の中野弘章さんは話します。市では小樽のスイーツやファッションなどのPRにつながる期待も高まっています。

    最近は国内だけでなく中国やフランスのメディアからの問い合わせも増えています。香港にもロリータファッションに注目している人が増えています。また、北海道はもともと東南アジアの人たちに人気の観光地です。今後は北海道名物の一つとしてロリータファッションが定着するかもしれません。

    文:土屋えみ

    Read More
  • トヨタ産業技術記念館

    [From Novemberber Issue 2014]

    This memorial museum utilizes the Meiji era factory where Toyota first originated. A total of 13 buildings and artifacts were designated in 2007 by the Japanese government as part of the country’s Industrial Modernization Heritage. Starting with the invention of the weaving loom and including its endeavors with domestic automobile production, it’s possible to learn about the company’s history. A violin performance by the Partner Robot, which made its debut at the Shanghai Expo, is also popular. Because there are cafes and kids’ areas, both children and adults can enjoy the facility all day long.
    Access: Three minute walk from Sako Station on the Meitetsu Nagoya Line
    Admission: Adults 500 yen / junior and senior high school students 300 yen / elementary school students 200 yen
    Opening hours: 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (admission until 4:30 p.m.)
    Days museum is closed: Monday (Tuesday, if Monday is a holiday), year-end, and New Year’s holidays
    Toyota Commemorative Museum of Industry and Technology
    Text: KAWARATANI Tokiko[2014年11月号掲載記事]

    トヨタグループ発祥の地にある、明治時代の工場を活用した記念館。2007年には建物および所有物計13点が近代化産業遺産に認定された。織機の発明から始まり、国産自動車製造に取り組んだ歴史が学べる。上海万博でデビューしたパートナーロボットのバイオリン演奏も人気。館内にはカフェやキッズコーナーがあるので、子どもから大人まで1日中楽しめる。
    交通:名鉄名古屋本線栄生駅より徒歩約3分
    観覧料金:大人500円 中高生300円 小学生200円
    開館時間:午前9時30分~午後5時(入場受付4時30分まで)
    休館日:月曜(祝日の場合翌日)、年末年始
    トヨタ産業技術記念館
    文:瓦谷登貴子

    Read More
  • 無添 くら寿司

    [From Novemberber Issue 2014]

    This conveyor belt sushi chain has more than 330 restaurants. A characteristic of the store is that no additives, such as artificial flavorings, are used with their ingredients. Seventy kinds of sushi can be eaten there for just 100 yen a plate. Besides sushi, the menu offers such items as ramen and tendon (tempura and rice in a bowl), made with well-prepared fish stock and other ingredients. After the meal, you can enjoy a cup of freshly ground coffee and a wide variety of desserts.

    [No. 1] Cured Natural Tuna: 100 yen

    Both time and effort goes into the curing process, thus bringing out the umami flavors of the tuna. This is popular both among men and women of all ages.
    201411-5-2

    [No. 2] Salmon: 100 yen

    This is especially popular with women and children. It’s also popular with hot cheese sauce or sliced onion on top.
    201411-5-3

    [No. 3] Yellowtail: 100 yen

    The method of preservation and mouthfeel are adjusted to suit the palates of local residents. In addition, on delivery, the fish is sliced in-store.
    201411-5-4
    Additive Free Kurazushi[2014年11月号掲載記事]

    330店舗以上ある回転寿司店。すべての材料に化学調味料などの添加物を使っていないのが特徴。常に70種類以上の寿司が1皿100円で食べられる。また、魚介だしや食材にこだわったラーメンや天丼など、寿司以外のメニューも充実。食後には、1杯ごとに豆から挽いて提供するコーヒーや、豊富な種類のデザートも楽しめる。

    【No.1】熟成【天然】まぐろ 100円

    ネタの加工に手間と時間を加えて熟成させ、まぐろの旨みを最大限に引き出した一品。年代、男女問わず大人気。

    【No.2】サーモン 100円

    特に子どもと女性に人気がある。チーズソースをのせてあぶったものや、スライスしたオニオンをのせたものも好評。

    【No.3】はまち 100円

    熟成具合や歯ごたえなどを地域の好みにあわせて調整している。さらに、水揚げされたものを店内でこまめにさばいて提供。

    無添 くら寿司

    Read More
  • 美食の国ベルギーを知ってほしい

    [From Novemberber Issue 2014]

    Paul De CONINCK
    In Sapporo City, Hokkaido, Paul De CONINCK runs Paul’s Cafe, an establishment that specializes in beer from his native Belgium. This often prompts people to ask him the following question: “What is your favorite beer?” Paul replies: “I don’t have one. When, where and with whom will you drink beer with? That’s a very important factor. I choose completely different beer based on that information.”
    It is said that there are over a thousand kinds of Belgian beer. While the Japanese tend to place importance on how it slips down the throat, the attraction of Belgium beer is that the way it is drunk varies greatly according to the brand. “When I drink with friends, I gulp down beer with a low alcohol content, but when it’s winter and I’m tired, I might choose a strong beer that satisfies after one glass,” Paul says. At Paul’s Café, there are always about seven kinds of draft beer available, as well as some 70 kinds of bottled beer.
    Besides beer, the shop’s menu includes waffles, frites (French fries), and typical Belgian dishes that use ingredients such as mussels. Out of these, Paul’s chicken comes highly recommended. Imported from Belgium, this rooster is roasted whole.
    Paul first came to Japan in 1988, as coach of a Belgian children’s baseball team. When he came back the next year, he visited Sapporo and loved it there. “I wanted to hang out in Sapporo for a year, so I took a leave of absence from the company I was working for,” he says. “Since then, for the past 25 years, I’ve been living in Sapporo.”
    As a student at a hotel school in Belgium, Paul learned various things about the hotel industry; including food preparation, hospitality and management. From the age of 14, he was involved in food-related work for restaurants and catering services. Taking advantage of that experience, he worked at restaurants and hotels in Sapporo. In 2000 he set up a business on his own and started selling Paul’s Chicken – which even today is still his shop’s signature dish. Then, in 2003, he opened Paul’s Cafe.
    Since his shop opened, the number of customers has been increasing steadily; these days beer lovers from Honshu (the main island of Japan) even visit. He has been asked to open branches in Tokyo and Osaka, but isn’t eager to expand, saying, “Only the shop I’m in can be called Paul’s Cafe.” Former employees of Paul’s Cafe have set up businesses themselves, so there are now more shops in Sapporo serving Belgian beer.
    These days craft beer (regionally made beer) has been gaining popularity in Japan. Large-scale beer events are held in Sapporo, too. Paul’s shop has benefitted from the fact that more people are drinking a variety of different beers. Paul, however, is going to suspend a big Belgian beer event he has held annually since he opened the shop. From now on, he wishes to organize events to inform the public about other aspects of his native country, including its food and culture.
    Belgium is located roughly in the center of Europe, and its capital Brussels has sometimes been called “the capital of Europe.” In the past, its convenient location unfortunately caused the country to be used over and over again as a battleground, but after each war, soldiers from the countries involved left behind something of their own culture. Paul thinks that the fusion of these influences created the gourmet culture of today’s Belgium. “I’m paying back the kind support I’ve received from the people of Sapporo by introducing them to the gourmet culture of Belgium.” He welcomes customers with a smile every day.
    Paul’s Cafe
    Text: ICHIMURA Masayo[2014年11月号掲載記事]

    ポール・デ・コニンクさん
    ポール・デ・コニンクさんは北海道札幌市で母国ベルギーのビール専門店「ポールズ・カフェ」を営んでいます。そのためよく聞かれる質問があります。「一番好きなビールは何ですか?」というものです。ポールさんの答えは「ありません」。「いつ、どこで、誰と飲むかというのがすごく大切なポイントです。それによって選ぶビールは全く違いますから」。
    ベルギービールは1,000種類以上あるといわれています。日本人はのど越しを重要視しますが、ベルギービールの魅力、飲み方は銘柄によって大きく異なります。ポールさん自身は「友達と飲むならアルコール度数の低いものをがぶがぶ飲むし、冬疲れているときはパンチがあって一杯で満足できるようなものを選ぶね」と言います。ポールズ・カフェには常時7種類の生ビールと約70種類のびんビールが用意されています。
    お店のメニューにはビール以外にも、ワッフルやフリッツ(フライドポテト)、ムール貝などベルギーらしい料理が並びます。その中で一番のおすすめはポールズチキンです。ベルギーから取り寄せたロースターを使って作る鳥の丸焼きです。
    ポールさんは1988年に、ベルギーの少年野球チームのコーチとして日本に来ました。翌年再び来日して初めて札幌を訪れ、すっかり気に入ってしまいました。「1年間札幌で遊ぼうと思って勤めていた会社を休職しました。それから25年間、ずっと札幌に住んでいます」。
    ポールさんは学生時代、ベルギーのホテル学校で調理やサービス、マネジメントなどホテル業に関する様々なことを勉強していました。14歳からはレストランやケータリングなど飲食関係の仕事に携わります。札幌でもその経験を生かし、レストランやホテルで仕事をしてきました。2000年に独立し、今もお店の看板メニューであるポールズチキンの販売をスタートします。そして2003年にポールズ・カフェをオープンしました。
    開店してから常連客は順調に増え、今では本州からもビール好きが訪れるほどです。東京や大阪で出店しないかという話もありますが「僕がいるお店こそがポールズ・カフェ」と、店舗数を増やすことには積極的ではありません。ポールズ・カフェで働いていた人のうち数人は独立し、札幌にはベルギービールの飲めるお店が増えました。
    最近日本ではクラフトビール(地ビール)が人気です。札幌でも大規模なイベントが開催されるようになりました。様々な種類のビールを飲む人が増えたことは、店にとっては追い風です。しかしポールさんは、お店の開業以来毎年続けてきた大がかりなベルギービールのイベントを今年で一端中断するつもりです。今後は、食事や文化などを含めもっと複合的に母国のことを知ってもらえるイベントを開催したいと考えています。
    ベルギーはヨーロッパのほぼ中央に位置し、首都のブリュッセルは「ヨーロッパの首都」と言われることもあります。過去にはその好立地が災いし何度も戦地となりましたが、その都度各国の兵士たちがそれぞれの文化を残していきました。それらが融合してベルギーは美食の国になったとポールさんは考えています。「『美食の国ベルギー』を紹介するのは私を大事にしてくれた札幌への恩返し」と、毎日笑顔でお客を迎えています。
    ポールズ・カフェ
    文:市村雅代

    Read More
  • 朱肉のいらないはんこの代名詞「シヤチハタ」

    [From Novemberber Issue 2014]

    Shachihata Inc.
    Outside Japan, important documents such as contracts and certificates are generally signed by the relevant parties. In Japan, a seal rather than a signature is called for in such situations. A seal has the same power as signature to guarantee the authenticity of the individual or the corporation. Seals for corporations are square-shaped and for individuals, round-shaped. They are stamped on documents in red ink. For individuals, there are ready-made “stamps” in addition to made-to-order seals.
    Besides seals used for official documents, stamps that require no inkpad or cinnabar ink paste are also used. Released in 1965, Shachihata Inc.’s “X Stamper” is one such seal. In particular, the pre-inked stamp, released in 1968, is so well known that similar stamps made by other companies are also called “Shachihata.”
    Stamps requiring no inkpad or cinnabar ink paste are commonly used nowadays, but the development of the X Stamper was beset by difficulties at first. The company had been considering the idea of ink-saturated rubber stamps for years. For a stamp to be used repeatedly, it was necessary to develop a spongy rubber that the ink could seep into.
    After many failures, its developers came up with a method using salt. First, rubber is mixed together with salt. If left in hot water for one day, the salt dissolves. Once the salt dissolves into the water, countless minuscule holes are left behind. The ink is stored in these holes. The result was that the right amount of ink would flow from it when the stamp was pressed.
    Funabashi Shokai, Shachihata’s predecessor, was founded in 1925 as a manufacturer of inkpads. This company had developed a “permanent inkpad” that could be used without refilling. In those days, ink immediately evaporated from inkpads. They had to be soaked in ink every time they were to be used. The permanent inkpad was a sensation because it eliminated the need to do this.
    “Our predecessors were thinking of using the rising sun from Japan’s national flag for the logo of this permanent inkpad. However, because of trademark issues, they chose a rising sun design with a shachihoko (mythical carp with the head of a lion and the body of a fish) inside it. This is because it was a symbol of Nagoya where our predecessors came from. Because of this, the product came to be named “Permanent Inkpad with a Shachi-Flag Logo,” NIWA Makiko, a member of Shachihata’s PR Department, says, explaining the brand’s origins. In 1941, the company was renamed Shachihata (Shachi-Flag).
    Other than the X Stamper, the company has developed many unique stationery products, including a pen that doubles as a name stamp. Shachihata has gained a reputation in recent years for manufacturing unusual products like the “Kezuri Cap;” a pencil sharpener that can be mounted and used on an empty PET bottle.
    Shachihata Inc.
    Text: ITO Koichi
    * Official company name シヤチハタ (Shiyachihata) are pronounced シャチハタ (Shachihata) despite its Japanese spelling.
    [2014年11月号掲載記事]

    シヤチハタ株式会社
    契約書や証明書などの大事な書類を取り交わすとき、海外ではそれに関わった人がサインをするのが一般的です。同じような場面で、日本ではサインよりも印鑑を求められます。印鑑はサインと同様に個人や法人を証明する力をもっています。印鑑は会社用の角印と個人用の丸印とがあり、朱色のインクを付けて書類に押します。個人用には注文して作るものの他、出来合いの「はんこ」もあります。
    公的文書で使う印鑑とは別に、スタンプ台や朱肉がなくても押せる商品も使われています。その一つとして、1965年に誕生したシヤチハタ株式会社の「Xスタンパー」というはんこがあります。中でも、1968年に誕生したネーム印は、他社で作られた同様のものも、「シャチハタ」と呼ばれるほどです。
    スタンプ台や朱肉のいらないはんこは今ではあたり前のように使われていますが、Xスタンパー開発当初は苦労の連続でした。ゴム印にインクを含ませるという考えはずっと前から温められていました。連続してなつ印するためには、ゴムをスポンジ状にし、そこにインクを染み込ませることが必要でした。
    何度も失敗を重ねた結果、開発者がたどりついた方法は塩を使うことでした。まず、ゴムとなる原料と一緒に塩を混ぜ合わせます。そして、お湯の中に一日近く浸しておくと、ゴムの中から塩が溶け出します。塩が溶けた後には無数の細かい穴ができています。この穴がインクを貯め、押す時に最適な量のインクが印面から出るようにしました。
    シヤチハタの前身である舟橋商会は、スタンプ台メーカーとして1925年に創業しました。インクを補充せずに連続して使うことのできる「万年スタンプ台」を開発。当時のスタンプ台は、表面からすぐにインクが蒸発していました。そのため、使うたびにインクをスタンプ台に染み込ませる必要がありました。万年スタンプ台はその作業が省けるので大変評判になりました。
    「創業者たちは万年スタンプ台のシンボルマークに日本の国旗、日の丸を考えていました。しかし、商標登録上の問題から、日の丸の中にシャチホコを納めたデザインにしました。シャチホコは創業者の出身地、名古屋のシンボルだからです。これを機に、この商品は『鯱旗印の万年スタンプ台』と呼ばれるようになりました」と広報室の丹羽真規子さんはブランドの由来を話します。1941年にはシヤチハタが社名にも使われるようになりました。
    Xスタンパーの他にも、ネーム印とペンを1本にしたネームペンなど、同社はデスク周りで使われる独自商品を次々に開発。近年は飲み終えたペットボトルに取り付けて使える鉛筆削り「ケズリキャップ」などユニークな商品を発売するメーカーとしても注目されています。
    シヤチハタ株式会社
    文:伊藤公一
    ※正式な会社名は「シヤチハタ」ですが、読み方は「シャチハタ」です。

    Read More
  • ワーキングホリデーを使って日本へ

    [From Novemberber Issue 2014]

    Ada TSO
    “I came to Japan on a working holiday scheme and I’m enjoying working and traveling,” says English language teacher Ada TSO. “I’d recommend working holidays to people who’ve just graduated from college and to those who want to start a completely new life. I myself quit a job to come to Japan because I wanted to live and work here while I was still young.”
    Ada was born in Hong Kong and grew up in New Zealand. “Every day I communicated in Cantonese and Mandarin with my family and Chinese immigrant neighbors, while speaking English at school,” she recalls. “When I was a child, my older brother often watched Japanese cartoons translated into Cantonese and I enjoyed ‘Doraemon’ and other programs with him. That’s how I came to be interested in Japanese anime and manga. I love ‘One Piece,’” she says with a smile.
    Ada took Japanese language courses in high school and university. While still in university, she came to Japan on an exchange program and studied at Sophia University for half a year. “It was a marvelous experience,” she says nostalgically. “So many Japanese students wanted to be friends with foreigners. We traveled a lot together. Some of them came all the way to New Zealand to visit after I returned home.”
    After graduating from university, Ada worked for a radio station in Auckland. “I worked as a news reporter and also as a moderator in public debates before elections.” She left that job after two years and returned to Japan for a year.
    “It’s a pity that because I teach English, I don’t have much opportunity to speak Japanese,” she says with a wry smile. She doesn’t attend a Japanese language school. “That’s why, when I get the chance to speak Japanese, I try practice my conversation as much as possible. On my days off, I memorize grammar and words with study-aid books. Unlike my student days, I now work full-time and it’s hard to maintain my motivation for studying. To spur myself on, I’ve made a goal of passing the N2 grade (of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test) before the end of this stay in Japan.”
    Ada sometimes works as a narrator in English and Cantonese. Most companies, however, don’t want to hire foreigners with a working holiday visa. “That’s why the majority of people here on a working visa have no choice but to become English teachers,” Ada says regretfully. “People who want to improve their career prospects, would do better to obtain a working visa by finding a Japanese employer before entering Japan,” she says.
    “Prices are high in Japan, but there are ways to save money. I found this site called tokyocheapo.com and discovered there were cheap shops like 100-yen shops and Matsuya,” says Ada. She now lives in a shared house to save on her rent. “The lower cost isn’t the only benefit of a shared house. You also get to know people from different countries, so you can make friends to go sightseeing with around Japan.”
    Ada visits cafes in her free time. “For me, the ideal confectionary does not only taste good, but looks good and also smells good. I’m researching exceptional confectionary by taking photographs. After returning to New Zealand, I want to work and save money in order to have a cafe of my own one day. I think the experience of tasting sweets and green tea in Japan will be useful then,” she says.
    Text: SAZAKI Ryo[2014年11月号掲載記事]

    エレダ・ソさん
    「ワーキングホリデーという制度を使って日本へ来て、仕事と旅行を楽しんでいます」と英語教師のエイダ・ソさんは言います。「ワーホリは、大学を卒業したばかりの人や、これまでの生活をがらりと変えたい人にお勧めの制度です。私自身は、まだ若いうちに日本で生活したり働いたりしたかったので、仕事を辞めて来日しました」。
    エイダさんは香港生まれ、ニュージーランド育ちです。「家族や、近所に住んでいる中国系移民の人たちとは広東語や北京語でコミュニケーションをとり、学校では英語を話す生活でした」と振り返ります。「子どものとき、広東語に訳された日本のアニメを兄がよく見ていて、私も『ドラえもん』などを一緒に楽しんでいました。それで日本のアニメやまんがに興味を持つようになりました。『ワンピース』が大好きです」とほほえみます。
    エイダさんは高校と大学で日本語の授業をとりました。大学のときには交換留学で日本へ来て、半年間上智大学で勉強しました。「すばらしい体験でした」と懐かしがります。「外国人と友達になりたい日本人学生がおおぜいいて、みんなでよく一緒に旅行しました。その中の何人かは私の帰国後、はるばるニュージーランドまで訪ねてきてくれました」。
    エイダさんは大学卒業後、オークランドでラジオ局に勤務しました。「ニュースのレポーターをしたり、選挙のときには公開討論の司会もしました」。そして2年後に退職して、1年間の予定で来日しました。
    「英語の教師なので日本語を話す機会が少ないのが残念です」とエイダさんは苦笑します。日本語学校へは通っていません。「だからこそ日本語で話すときには、できるだけたくさん会話して練習するようにしています。休日には参考書を使って文法や単語を覚えています。学生時代と違って社会人の今は、勉強のモチベーションを維持するのが大変です。『今回の日本滞在の間にN2に合格する』という目標を掲げてやる気を高めています」。
    エイダさんはときどき英語や広東語のナレーションの仕事をしています。しかしほとんどの企業はワーホリ・ビザの外国人を雇用したがりません。「だからワーホリで来た人はたいてい語学教師になるしかないんです」とエイダさんは残念がります。「自分のキャリアを磨きたい人は、入国前に雇ってくれる日本企業を探して就労ビザをとった方がいいです」と言います。
    「日本は物価が高いですが、お金を節約する方法はあります。私はtokyocheapo.comというサイトを見て、100円ショップや松屋など安いお店があることを知りました」とエイダさん。現在はシェアハウスに住んで家賃の負担を軽くしています。「シェアハウスのメリットは安いだけではありません。いろいろな国から来た人と知り合えるので、日本国内を一緒に観光する友達を見つけることもできます」。
    エイダさんは、暇なときにはカフェめぐりをしています。「理想のスイーツとは、味だけでなく見た目や香りもいいものだと思います。すばらしいスイーツは写真を撮って研究しています。ニュージーランドへ帰ったら働いてお金を貯めて、いつか自分のカフェを持ちたいんです。日本でスイーツや緑茶を味わった経験は、そのとき役に立つと思います」と話します。
    文:砂崎良

    Read More