×
  • 二人のヒロインの恋と友情物語

    [From Novemberber Issue 2014]

    201411-9-1

    © 矢沢漫画制作所/集英社
    NANA, Cover of issue 1.
    Written by YAZAWA Ai. Published by Shueisha Inc.


    NANA
    Brought up in a normal family, KOMATSU Nana’s (nicknamed Hachi) sole aim in life is to fall in love. OSAKI Nana, however, has led a lonely existence since she was abandoned by her mother when she was young. This is the story of the friendship that develops between two girls named Nana who strive to live their lives to the fullest despite getting wounded in love.
    Hachi first encounters Nana on the shinkansen (bullet train) to Tokyo; Hachi is going to stay with her boyfriend, while Nana is hoping to make it big as a vocalist in a punk band. Since they are both 20 years old and have the same name, they hit it off and decide to share a flat together. Nana starts a band, but Hachi gets deeply hurt by the betrayal of her boyfriend. With Nana’s support Hachi recovers, and the bond between the two deepens.
    The two main characters influence one other. Nana used to go out with Ren – who was in the same band and is now the star of a popular band. After they split up, they lost touch. Hachi who has been dependent on love and is spoiled by those around her, begins to stand on her own two feet after meeting Nana. Nana meets Ren again with the help of Hachi. They reaffirm their continuing affection for one another.
    Supported by Hachi, Nana channels her passion into her band’s live performances. As the lovers get back together, collaboration between the two bands begins. For Hachi, who was originally a fan of Ren’s band, it feels like a dream.
    Nana is narrated with the present day drama being carried out alongside flash-forwards into the future and flashbacks of the past. Nana portrays its protagonists as real life women with weaknesses and a selfish side. In the story, just when each of them finds happiness, ironically a crisis is visited on their friendship. The people around them get caught up in this, leading to an unexpected development.
    Serialization of this manga began in 2000 in the magazine Cookie; subsequently 21 volumes were published. In 2005 the live-action adaptation was a big hit with more than three million people going to see the movie. Since translated versions were released in the United States, Germany, France, and other countries, it has gained ardent fans in many countries. Its broad appeal seems to be in its universal themes of strong friendship and disappointment in love that surpass differences of language and culture.
    Serialization was halted by the sudden illness of the author in 2009, so the story has not yet concluded. This May, a short comic based on the original story was published. This has raised hopes among fans that this will provide the impetus for the story to be resumed.
    Text: KAWARATANI Tokiko[2014年11月号掲載記事]
    201411-9-1

    © 矢沢漫画制作所/集英社
    NANA1巻表紙。矢沢あい著
    集英社発行


    NANA
    平凡な家庭に育ち、恋愛だけが人生の目的である小松奈々(愛称:ハチ)と、幼い頃に母親に捨てられた孤独な境遇の大崎ナナ。対照的なNANAが友情を育み、恋愛に傷つきながらも懸命に生きていく物語です。
    彼氏のもとに向かうハチと、パンクバンドのボーカルとして成功を夢見るナナは、東京行きの新幹線で出会います。二人とも20歳で同じ名前であることから意気投合し、ルームメイトとして一緒に暮らすことになります。ナナがバンド活動を開始する一方、ハチは彼氏の裏切りで深く傷つきます。ナナの支えで立ち直り、二人の絆は深まっていきます。
    二人の主人公は、影響を与え合います。ナナは、かつて同じバンドメンバーで、今は人気バンドのスターとなっているレンと恋人同士でした。別れてからは、音信不通になっています。恋愛に依存して周囲に甘えて生きてきたハチは、ナナとの出会いから自立を模索します。ナナはハチの手助けでレンと再会します。そして、お互いの恋心が続いていたことを再確認します。
    ハチの応援を受けて、ナナはバンドのライブ活動に情熱を注ぎます。そしてレンと恋人の関係に戻ったことから、ハチを交えた二つのバンドの交流が始まります。元々レンが所属するバンドのファンだったハチにとって、それは夢のようなひとときでした。
    NANAは、未来から過去を振り返るナレーションが入り、現在のドラマが進行します。ヒロインのどちらもが、弱さやエゴイスティックな面を持つ等身大の女性として描かれているのが特徴です。物語では、それぞれが幸せをつかみかけたときに、皮肉にも友情に危機が訪れます。そして、周囲を巻き込んで思わぬ展開へと走り出します。
    2000年に雑誌Cookieで連載が始まり、その後コミックスは21巻まで発行されています。2005年には実写映画化され、観客動員数は300万人を超える大ヒットになりました。アメリカ、ドイツ、フランスなどで翻訳発売され、各国でも熱烈なファンがいます。深い友情や恋愛の悩みといった普遍的なテーマが、言葉や文化を超えて支持を広げているようです。
    作者の急病で2009年に連載が休止し、物語は完結していません。今年5月には、本編とは別の短いまんがが掲載されました。再開のきっかけになればとファンの間では期待が高まっています。
    文:瓦谷登貴子

    Read More
  • 山頂での芸者体験

    [From October Issue 2014]

    Tenku (Celestial) Geisha Night
    Mt. Mitake in Ome City, Tokyo Prefecture, has been revered since ancient times as the most sacred spot in Kanto. On the summit is the Musashi Mitake Shinto Shrine. Since the middle of the Edo era (17 – 18th centuries), the people of Kanto have been visiting this shrine to the God of farming. It was once common for people to make so-called Mitake moude (shrine visits) in order to receive lucky charms for a bumper harvest.
    The vestiges of this history can be seen near the summit, where shukubo (shrine lodging) are clustered. Even today, you can spend a night in one of them and taste traditional, simple dishes, containing seasonal produce from the mountain and homegrown vegetables. Many people voice such opinions as: “The food was good and I’m glad I had a relaxing time in such a quiet environment.”
    By taking a train, bus, cable car and then continuing on foot, it takes three hours to reach Mt. Mitake from Tokyo. Just 929 meters above sea level, it’s a popular mountain which anyone, from children to seniors, can easily climb. It’s also a treasure house of birds, insects and plants. An oasis within Tokyo Prefecture, here you can enjoy forest walks, visits to the shrine or relaxing at a shukubo.
    Currently, an event called “Tenku (Celestial) Geisha Night” is being held once a month near the summit. There’s little explanation in English, but it’s organized in such a way that non-Japanese can also have a good time. It’s composed of two parts: for the first part geisha dance and play music on a specially made stage in front of the Musashi Mitake Shrine; for the second part guests move to their shukubo’s dining hall where they can play ozashiki (games while drinking) and enjoy music as well as dancing.
    The first part requires no prior reservation. Typically between 100 and 200 people participate. Antonio GUERRERO from Spain had spent the previous night at a shukubo and said excitedly, “This mountain is magnificent because of its tranquility. I enjoyed watching geisha dancing up close.”
    The second part requires a reservation and numbers are limited to 50 people. Guests get fired up playing “omawarisan” (Mr. Policeman) and “toraken” (tiger game) – games based on rock-paper-scissors. American Maggie ROBY who teaches English in Japan said, contentedly, “I joined up after seeing this on a blog. It was so much fun that I want to come back in the near future.” Her friend Bridget Wynne WILLSON also commented, “I really enjoyed myself. It’s my first time at a shukubo, so I’m looking forward to my stay tonight.”
    BABA Yoshihiko is vice president of Mt. Mitake Commerce Association which organizes the event. He says, enthusiastically, “Through such events, we’d like to demonstrate the appeal of Mt. Mitake’s culture to foreign tourists.” The event will be held until December of this year. There’s no charge.
    Tenku (Celestial) Geisha Night
    Text: KONO Yu[2014年10月号掲載記事]

    天空芸者ナイト
    東京都青梅市にある御岳山は古来より関東で一番の霊場として崇められてきました。山頂には武蔵御嶽神社があります。江戸時代中頃(17~18世紀)から関東の人々に農耕の神として参拝されてきました。ここで豊作祈願の御札をいただくことは御嶽詣と呼ばれ、盛んに行われていたのです。
    その名残で、山頂付近には宿坊(神社にお参りする人のための宿泊施設)が集まっています。今でもここに泊まり、山で採れた季節の食材や自家栽培の野菜を中心に、古くから続く素朴な料理を味わうことができます。「料理はおいしかったし、すごく静かでゆっくりできてよかった」という声が多く寄せられます。
    御岳山へは東京駅から電車とバス、ケーブルカーを乗り継ぎ、徒歩を含め約3時間です。標高929メートルで、子どもから年配の人まで気軽に登ることができる山として親しまれています。野鳥や昆虫、植物の宝庫でもあります。森林浴を楽しみ、神社に参拝し、宿坊でのんびりする――御岳山は都内にあるオアシスです。
    現在、山頂付近で、毎月一回「天空芸者ナイト」というイベントが行われています。英語の説明はほとんどありませんが、外国人も楽しめる構成になっています。二部に分かれており、第一部は武蔵御嶽神社前広場の特設ステージで、芸者による踊りと演奏が行われます。第二部は宿坊の座敷に移動し、お酒を飲みながら芸者とお座敷遊びをしたり、音楽や踊りを楽しんだりすることができ
    ます。
    第一部の申し込みは不要です。通常100~200人が参加します。前の晩は宿坊で過ごしたスペイン人のアントニオ・ゲレロさんは、「この山は静かで素晴らしいです。芸者の踊りを間近で見られて楽しかったです」と興奮気味に話します。
    第二部は50人限定で予約が必要です。じゃんけんをアレンジしたお座敷遊びの「おまわりさん」や「とらけん」で盛り上がります。日本で英語教師をしているアメリカ人のマギー・ロビーさんは、「ブログで見つけて参加しました。とても楽しかったので、近いうちにまた来たいです」と満足そうに話します。友達のブリジット・ウィニー・ウィルソンさんも「本当に楽しかったです。宿坊は初めてなので今晩泊まるのが楽しみです」と言います。
    このイベントを主催する御岳山商店組合、副組合長の馬場喜彦さんは、「こういったイベントを通じて、外国のお客様に魅力的な御岳山の文化をアピールしたいです」と意気込みます。今年12月まで行われます。料金は無料。
    天空芸者ナイト
    文:河野有

    Read More
  • 「枡」の新しい役割を探して

    [From October Issue 2014]

    Masukoubou Masuya
    “Sake comes in a one ‘shou’ bottle.” “Boil two ‘gou’ of rice.” ‘Shou’ and ‘gou’ are both units for measuring volume. These units are measured in a special container made from Japanese cypress called a “masu.” Japan used to use shou and gou for measuring units, but nowadays liters and kilograms are mostly used. Masu are used more often as cups for drinking sake, rather than as measuring utensils. And even this (way of using them) isn’t very common.
    OHASHI Hiroyuki, the third generation director of Ohashi Ryoki (Ogaki City, Gifu Prefecture), is trying to find new uses for his masu. Masu have been familiar objects to Ohashi since childhood, but upon graduating from college, he joined IBM and his life took a completely different course. However, when he went home at the age of 27 to announce his engagement to his parents, they asked him to take over the family business. Two years later he quit his job and took over the business, initially with little enthusiasm.
    He changed his mind when he took a look at their accounts. “The sales figures were about half of what I’d heard from my parents when I was in junior high school. I was so alarmed that I made the round of our customers across Japan.” In four years, sales rose back up to 80% of what they once were. Yet, around the same time, he started feeling that his sales efforts weren’t making much difference anymore. “I began to understand that if we continued to sell cheap we couldn’t expand.” That was the second time warning bells went off.
    So he began to wonder if he could create something new by improving his masu. At the same time, he tried to satisfy all of his customer’s requests. He soon secured a large order. It was a huge opportunity, but the quantity was such that he failed to handle it properly and ended up delivering a large amount of defective products. “That was a huge failure. Since then, I’ve decided never to take on any work we can’t deal with.” Adopting a policy of selling only quality handmade products, he managed to create different models of masu by producing a variety of prototypes.
    To sell these items, in 2005 he opened the factory store “Masukoubou Masuya” on his factory site. By offering unusual products – storage cases for knickknacks with synthetic marble lids, triangular sake cups, different-sized masu for easily measuring ingredients for bagels or buns with a bean-jam filling – more people took an interest in masu itself and the sales of traditional masu also increased.
    Ohashi is enthusiastic about overseas marketing. In order to do this, rather than advocate that they are used in the same way as they are in Japan, he intends to suggest different uses of masu to suit different lifestyles. “Should we market masu with additional features or create something entirely new? It’s hard work to come up with ideas, but I wouldn’t be happy if our products were only used for a short time.” At a trade fair in New York, he showcased them as containers for seasonings, including sugar, and also as utensils for measuring ounces.
    Masu have been used for 1,300 years since the Nara era (8th century). Ohashi describes the appeal: “Its story has been cultivated by its long history. It’s possible to sense the smell and warmth of Japanese cypress. It also has a complete, simple beauty.” His newly purposed masu have inherited those characteristics.
    Masukoubou Masuya
    Text: ICHIMURA Masayo[2014年10月号掲載記事]

    枡工房枡屋
    「一升瓶に入ったお酒」「お米を二合炊く」――升も合も体積を表す単位です。枡というヒノキで作られた専用の容器を使って量ります。かつての日本では升や合が一般的な単位でしたが、今ではリットルやキログラムを使うことがほとんどです。枡も量るものとしてではなく日本酒を飲む器として使われることのほうが多くなりました。ただしこちらもそれほど日常的ではありません。
    そんな枡に新しい役割を与えようと試みているのが大橋量器(岐阜県大垣市)の三代目当主、大橋博行さんです。大橋さんは小さいころから枡に親しんできましたが、大学卒業後はIBMに就職し全く別の道を歩んでいました。ところが27歳のとき、結婚を知らせるために実家に帰ると親から跡を継ぐように言われます。2年後に退職して跡を継ぎますが、最初は熱心にはなれませんでした。
    気持ちが変わったのは決算書を見たときです。「中学時代に親から聞いた数字の半分くらいでした。それで危機感を抱いて全国を営業してまわったんです」。4年ほど経つと売り上げがかつての8割ほどに戻ってきました。しかし同じ頃から営業にあまり手ごたえを感じなくなります。「安く売るというやり方では限界があると肌で感じました」。これが第二の危機感でした。
    そこで枡を改良して何か新しいものができないかと考え始めます。また、お客のどんな要望も聞き入れるようにしました。そうするうちに大口の注文が舞い込みます。大きなチャンスでしたが、注文数が多すぎてさばききれず不良品を大量に出してしまいました。「あれは大失敗でしたね。それ以降自分たちでできること以上の仕事はしないと決めました」。手作りで質のいいものだけを売るという方針で試作品を作るうちに様々な枡ができあがりました。
    2005年にはそれらを販売する「枡工房枡屋」を工場の敷地内にオープンします。人工大理石のふたをつけた小物入れや三角形のおちょこ、ベーグルやまんじゅうの材料を簡単に量れる枡セット――一風変わった品を置くことで枡自体に興味を持ってくれる人が増え、昔ながらの枡の売り上げも伸びました。
    大橋さんは海外展開にも積極的です。その際、枡をそのまま紹介するのではなく、それぞれの生活様式に合った使い方を提案したいと考えています。「枡プラスアルファで展開するか全く新しいものを作り出すか。考えるのはとても大変な作業ですが、一時的に使われて終わりにはしたくないんです」。ニューヨークでの展示会では砂糖などの調味料を入れる容器として紹介したり、オンスが量れる枡も用意しました。
    枡は奈良時代(8世紀)から1300年使われてきました。大橋さんはその魅力を「長い歴史で培われてきたストーリーがあるところ。ヒノキの香りと温もりを感じられること。そして完成されたシンプルな美しさがあるところ」と話します。それらは新たな用途を持った枡にも引き継がれています。
    枡工房枡屋
    文:市村雅代

    Read More
  • 紙のように薄い老眼鏡

    [From October Issue 2014]

    Nishimura Precision Co., Ltd.
    As the name suggests, Paper Glass are quite literally paper thin reading glasses. They can be folded flat to a thickness of two millimeters. If you open them out, the lenses tilt downward to help you read the text before you. The temple arms that fit over the ear curve gently round to match the shape of the head. These portable and beautifully designed reading glasses were created in 2012 and won a special award at the Good Design Awards in 2013.
    SAITO Rikito, PR staff member for the sales company Nishimura Precision Co., Ltd. cries out delightedly, “Until then, we were taking two to three months to produce a batch of 100 pairs. Since the award, this has risen to 6,000 a month.” From this it’s possible to deduce that a lot of people were waiting expectantly for them.
    Paper Glass are made by Nishimura Co., Ltd. in Sabae City, Fukui Prefecture. Sabae City produces 90% of Japan’s eyeglasses and has a 20% share of the world market for eyeglasses. Nishimura was once a manufacturer of screws and hinges for eyeglasses. However, in the beginning of the nineties, they started losing work to China. Because of this, in addition to manufacturing glasses, they began taking metalworking contracts to make the best use of the technology they’d developed as a manufacturer of other metal parts.
    At the start of the millennium, they received a tricky commission to produce robust reading glasses which are easy to carry and stylish. Through trial and error, they came up with a way to fix the hinges on the frame at a diagonal angle. With all the requirements met and the hinges installed at this angle, the lenses naturally tilted forwards when worn. This is ideal for reading and for peering over the lens to view objects further away. It dispenses with the need to constantly put on and take off your glasses. The company has patented this technology.
    Nishimura had never produced a complete pair of eyeglasses itself. The company launched its own brand when another company in Sabae City taught them the basic knowhow required to produce a pair of spectacles. In order to develop new sales channels, the decision was made to sell the glasses on the company’s own website.
    The advantage of online sales is that user feedback directly reaches the company. Taking these opinions into consideration, minor changes are occasionally made. For example, the frame width has been adjusted. Although all Paper Glass were designed as one-size-fits-all models for both men and women, some female users commented, “They are so wide that they fall off.” In answer to those complaints, the models were redesigned to fit women’s faces.
    “Elderly ladies in particular have told us that ‘you’ve made reading glasses that I can finally use outside my home.’ Some say they didn’t even feel like going out because they didn’t want to wear reading glasses in front of others,” says Saito.
    If all you want is to be able to see, it’s even possible to buy glasses at 100-yen shops. Paper Glass provides extensive customer service: different strength lenses for each glass are available and repairs are basically free. Paper Glass spectacles have completely revamped the image of reading glasses.
    Paper Glass
    Text: ICHIMURA Masayo[2014年10月号掲載記事]

    株式会社西村プレシジョン
    ペーパーグラスは、名前の通り紙のように薄い老眼鏡です。たたむと平らになり、厚さは約2ミリになります。開くとレンズは手元の文字が読みやすいように斜め下に傾きます。そして耳にかけるつるの部分は内側にゆるやかに曲がり側頭部にフィットします。携帯性とデザイン性にすぐれたこの老眼鏡は2012年に誕生し、2013年にはグッドデザイン賞特別賞を受賞しました。
    販売元の株式会社西村プレシジョンの広報担当、齊藤力仁さんは「それまでは2~3ヵ月かけて1ロット100本前後生産していたのですが、受賞後は月に6,000本です」とうれしい悲鳴を上げています。待ち望んでいた人が多かったことがわかります。
    ペーパーグラスを作っているのは福井県鯖江市にある株式会社西村金属です。鯖江市はめがね製造の国内シェア90%、世界でも20%を担う土地です。西村金属もかつてはめがねのネジや丁番を作っていました。しかし90年代に入ると仕事が中国に流れるようになります。そこで、部品作りで培ってきた技術を生かし、めがね以外の金属加工請け負い業も始めました。
    2000年代に入ると、携帯性とデザイン性に優れた丈夫な老眼鏡ができないかという難しい依頼が舞い込みます。試行錯誤の末、丁番をフレームに対して斜めに取り付けるという方法が編み出されました。要求をすべて満たした上、この角度で丁番を取り付けることで、めがねをかけると自然にレンズが斜め下を向くようになります。文字を読むのにちょうどよく、また遠くの物はレンズを通さずに見えます。いちいちかけたり外したりしないですむのです。この技術では特許も取りました。
    西村金属ではめがねすべてを自社で作ったことはありませんでした。めがね作りの基本的なノウハウは、鯖江市内の他業者から教えてもらい初めての自社ブランドを作り上げたのです。新しい販路を開拓するために自社ホームページで販売することになりました。
    ネット販売の強みは利用者の声がダイレクトに届くことです。その声を参考にマイナーチェンジすることもあります。例えば、フレームの幅です。ペーパーグラスは全種男女兼用サイズで設計されましたが、女性客から「横幅が広くてずり落ちてしまう」と言われたのです。その声を受け、女性の顔にもフィットするように設計しなおしました。
    「特に年配の女性からは『やっと外でかけられる老眼鏡ができた』と言われることがあります。これまでは人前で老眼鏡をかけるのがいやで外出すること自体がいやになっていたという方もいます」と齊藤さんは話します。
    ただ見えればいいということであれば、100円ショップでも売っています。ペーパーグラスは左右で度数の違うレンズを入れることができたり、修理は基本的に無料などサービスも充実しています。何よりも、これまでの老眼鏡のイメージを覆しました。
    ペーパーグラス
    文:市村雅代

    Read More
  • 天丼てんや

    [From October Issue 2014]

    This store specializes in tempura and tendon (a bowl of rice topped with tempura and covered in a salty-sweet sauce). Freshly fried and reasonably priced tempura can be eaten here. There are 145 stores around the capital and five overseas stores. The tempura oil used is 100% vegetable oil which has zero cholesterol. Rice, soba (thin buckwheat noodles), or udon (thick wheat noodles), can be added to a set meal for an additional fee. Takeaway is available as well.

    [No. 1] Tendon (regular portion) 500 yen

    Signature dish with prawn, squid, sand borer (a kind of whiting fish), pumpkin, and kidney beans tempura topping. Unchanged since the business was established 26 years ago, this is the most popular item on the menu.
    201410-6-2

    [No. 2] The Original All-Star Tendon (regular portion) 720 yen

    Rice bowl topped with prawn, large squid, scallop, maitake mushroom, lotus root, and eggplant tempura. This combination of fish and vegetable tempura is popular among their tempura.
    201410-6-3

    [No. 3] Vegetable Tendon (regular portion) 500 yen

    This tempura bowl has six kinds of vegetable tempura toppings (eggplant, maitake mushrooms, lotus root, sweet potato, pumpkin, and kidney beans). It’s possible to enjoy the changing colors and textures of the vegetables according to the season.
    201410-6-4
    All prices include sales tax.
    TEMPURA TENDON TENYA[2014年10月号掲載記事]

    天ぷらと天丼(天ぷらをごはんの上にのせ、甘辛いたれをかけたもの)の専門店。揚げたての天ぷらが手頃な価格で食べられる。首都圏を中心に145店舗、海外に5店舗を展開。天ぷら油にはコレステロールゼロで植物油100%のものを使っている。追加料金でごはん、そば、うどんとのセットにすることもできる。また、テイクアウトもできる。

    【No.1】天丼(並盛) 500円

    エビ、イカ、キス、カボチャ、インゲンの天ぷらがのった看板商品。創業から26年間変わらず一番の人気メニュー。

    【No.2】元祖オールスター天丼(並盛) 720円

    エビ、大イカ、ホタテ、マイタケ、レンコン、ナスの天丼。天ぷらの中で人気の高い魚介と野菜を組み合わせた。

    【No.3】野菜天丼(並盛) 500円

    野菜の天ぷら6品(ナス、マイタケ、レンコン、サツマイモ、カボチャ、インゲン)がのった天丼。季節によってかわる野菜の彩りや食感が楽しめる。

    価格は税込み。
    天丼てんや

    Read More
  • 途上国の子どもの未来をひらくランドセル

    [From October Issue 2014]

    JOICFP
    Many women in developing countries still die from pregnancy and childbirth. Hoping to decrease the numbers of these victims, the Japanese Organization for International Cooperation in Family Planning (JOICFP) began its activities in 1968. The main focus of its efforts involves giving women from developing countries the opportunity to have health checkups and providing them with health advice. For the past ten years, the organization has been actively engaged in the “Omoide no Randoseru Gift” (Memorial Backpack Gift) project. For this project, school supplies and used randoseru (school backpacks) are sent to children in Afghanistan.
    Peculiar to Japan, randoseru are leather bags used by primary schoolchildren on their school commute. Shaped like a box, these are carried on the back. Back when they were conceived of in the Meiji era (19 – 20th centuries) only children from affluent families possessed them. Nowadays, nearly 100% of children have one. Typically given by parents or grandparents upon enrollment, when the child leaves primary school the randoseru’s six year duty is over.
    The randoseru are sent so that more Afghan children can receive an education. In addition to providing concrete support, they create an environment conducive to education. Under the Taliban regime – which collapsed 13 years ago – women were forbidden to receive an education. There are still a lot of parents who think that education is not necessary for girls. In addition, many poor families rely on child labor to survive.
    “Many women have lost their lives because knowledge about health and hygiene is poor. If they could read and write, they could acquire knowledge that would safeguard their own lives, and could secure their own future,” JOICFP Partnership Promotion Group Program Officer YUYAMA Satoru says.
    “It would be hugely significant if boys and girls made their way to and from school carrying the same items. It may be that if parents who believe that it’s not necessary for girls to go to school see a neighboring girl going to school with a randoseru on her back, their mentality might gradually change. Through study, boys will also be able to protect their families in the future.”
    The unique form of the randoseru also helps students to learn. Due to a shortage of classrooms – many of which were destroyed in the civil war – classes often take place outdoors. In such cases, the box-shaped randoseru can be used as a desk.
    The campaign to collect randoseru is held every year from March to May and this year 18,674 randoseru were collected. However, Yuyama say that it is not yet enough. “In Nangarhar Province where JOICFP distributes randoseru, it’s estimated that approximately 90,000 children enter school each year. It’s believed that the same amount of children are unable to attend school.”
    A randoseru is no ordinary bag. It is crammed with the good wishes of parents and grandparents celebrating a child’s entry to school and packed with the child’s own memories. Yuyama says that it would be nice if, by sending their precious randoseru over, Japanese families begin to think of these Afghan children.
    JOICFP
    Text: ICHIMURA Masayo[2014年10月号掲載記事]

    公益財団法人ジョイセフ
    発展途上国では今でも妊娠や出産をきっかけに亡くなる女性がたくさんいます。公益財団法人ジョイセフはそうした人が減るように1968年から活動してきました。途上国の女性に診察を受ける機会を増やしたり保健指導をすることが主な内容です。10年前からは「想い出のランドセルギフト」に取り組んでいます。アフガニスタンの子どもたちに学用品や使い終わったランドセルを送るプロジェクトです。
    ランドセルは日本独特のもので、小学生が通学に使う革製のカバンです。箱型をしており、背負って使います。明治時代(19~20世紀)に誕生したといわれており、当時は裕福な家庭の子どもしか持てませんでした。現在ではほぼ100%の児童が持っています。入学時に親や祖父母から贈られるのが一般的で、卒業と同時に6年間の役目を終えます。
    ランドセルを送るのは、アフガニスタンのより多くの子どもたちが教育を受けられるようにするためです。物理的な支援でもあり、教育を受けやすい環境づくりにもつながっています。13年前に崩壊したタリバン政権下では女性が教育を受けることを禁じていました。現在も女の子に教育は必要ないと考えている親は少なくありません。また多くの貧しい家庭は子どもを労働力として頼りにしています。
    「保健や衛生に関する知識が乏しいために、多くの女性が命を落としています。読み書きができれば自分の命を守るための知識を得て、将来自分の身を守ることができるようになります」とジョイセフの支援事業グループプログラムオフィサーの柚山訓さんは話します。
    「男の子と女の子が同じものを持って学校に通うということ自体にも大きな意味があるんです。女の子は学校に通う必要がないと思っている親も、近所の女の子がランドセルを背負って男の子と同じように学校に通う姿を見れば考えが少しずつ変わってくる可能性があります。男の子も勉強することで将来自分の家族の命を守ることができるようになります」。
    ランドセルの個性的な形も学ぶ助けになります。内戦で破壊されてしまったため、校舎が足りず屋外で授業を受けることも多いです。そんなとき箱型のランドセルは机としても使えるのです。
    ランドセルを集めるキャンペーンは毎年3~5月に行っており、今年は18,674個集まりました。しかし柚山さんはまだ足りないと言います。「ジョイセフがランドセルを配付しているナンガハール州では学校に入学する子どもは毎年約9万人と推定されています。学校に行けない子どもも同じくらいいると思われます」。
    ランドセルはただのカバンではありません。子どもが学校に入学したことを祝う親や祖父母の気持ち、そして子どもたちの思いがぎっしりつまっています。大切なランドセルを送ることを通してアフガニスタンの子どものことを家庭で考えるきっかけになれば、とも柚山さんは話します。
    公益財団法人ジョイセフ
    文:市村雅代

    Read More
  • わけあって安い商品で人気

    [From October Issue 2014]

    Mujirushi Ryohin
    Dried shiitake mushrooms that taste no different even though they’re cracked; recycled memo pads that aren’t pure white but are good enough to use; u-shaped pasta made from spaghetti that has been discarded to create uniform strands; clothing and small items made of purposely un-dyed material that utilizes the cloth’s natural hue. These are all products “Mujirushi Ryohin” planned and developed soon after the company was founded.
    Mujirushi Ryohin was conceived in 1980 with the catchphrase “There’s a Reason It’s Cheap.” Before that, shops were crammed with products that had unnecessary features, had too much decoration and had excessive packaging. Mujirushi Ryohin focused on producing goods stripped of such wasteful excess. Its product line is comprised of such things as clothing, household goods, and food.
    Each Mujirushi Ryohin product needs a good reason to come into being. This reason is outlined on packaging, wrapping paper and price tags. At first, the company was a private brand owned by Seiyu, but in 1989, as Ryohin Keikaku Co.,Ltd., it became an independent enterprise. It’s grown into a global brand that now has 269 stores in Japan, supplies another 116 stores and operates a total of 255 stores outside the country. It operates overseas under the name of MUJI.
    The idea of “no branding, but quality products” is contained within the name Mujirushi Ryohin. For product planning and development, the company therefore places importance on “creating things that are really necessary in everyday life, made in the most functional form.” In order to achieve this, the company strives to source different materials, to cut down on production time and to simplify packaging.
    A characteristic of Mujirushi Ryohin is that customers’ opinions gathered in shops, by phone, by email and on the Internet are taken into account when it comes to product development and the quality of service given. For example, the “Body Fitting Sofa” was developed in answer to those who had commented that “I wish I could buy a sofa, but it would take up too much space in my room, so I’d rather have a big cushion that I could comfortably sink my body into.” It was a big hit and more than 60,000 were sold in the first year and a half.
    Ryohin Keikaku has a number of rules about “things Mujirushi Ryohin shouldn’t do.” These include: “No brand name on products;” “Only sell things designed for Mujirushi Ryohin;” “No use of strong colors on products” and “Never hire celebrities for ads.” This is so employees never forget the essence of what Mujirushi Ryohin is about.
    Inspired by Mujirushi Ryohin, other companies launched successive products with a similar aim. Most have vanished, however. They didn’t last because the attitude to production of these imitation products was based on vague notions. Mujirushi means no brand. But you could say that “Mujirushi” itself is now recognized as a reliable brand.
    Ryohin Keikaku CO., Ltd.
    Text: ITO Koichi/文:伊藤公一

    [2014年10月号掲載記事]

     

    無印良品

    われてしまっているけれど味は変わらない干しシイタケ。真っ白ではないけれど使うぶんには差し支えのない再生紙のメモ帳。長さを揃えるために捨てられていた部分のU字型のパスタ。わざと染めないで素材の色をそのまま生かした生成りの衣類や小物。どれも「無印良品」が誕生当時に企画・開発してきた商品の一部です。

    無印良品は「わけあって、安い。」をキャッチフレーズとして1980年に誕生しました。それまで売り場には不要な機能を付けたり必要以上の装飾を施したり、過剰に包装したりする商品が売り場にあふれていました。無印良品のものづくりは、そんなむだを取り除くことに着目しました。商品は衣服、生活雑貨、食品などで構成されています。

    無印良品の商品には、一つひとつに成り立ちに理由が必ずあります。その理由はパッケージや包装紙、タグなどで説明されています。最初は西友のプライベートブランドでしたが、1989年に株式会社良品計画として独立しました。現在、日本国内に269の直営店、116の商品供給店、海外に合計255店舗を展開するグローバルブランドに成長。海外ではMUJIの店名で知られています。

    無印良品の名前には「印(ブランド)は無いけれども、良い品である」という気持ちが込められています。ですから、商品を企画・開発するときには「生活の基本となる本当に必要なものを、本当に必要な形でつくること」を重視。それを実現するために素材を見直したり、作るときの手間を省いたり、包装を簡単にしたりすることに努めています。

    無印良品の特徴は、店舗や電話、メール、インターネットなどで集めた顧客の声を商品やサービスに生かしていることです。その一例が「体にフィットするソファ」です。「ソファを買いたいけれども、部屋が狭くなってしまうので、ゆったりと体を預けられる大型クッションが欲しい」という声に応えて開発。最初の1年半で6万個以上を販売する大ヒット商品となりました。

    良品計画には「無印良品がやらないこと」という、いくつかの決まりがあります。「製品にブランド名を付けない」「無印良品のためにデザインされたものだけを売る」「製品に強い色を使わない」「有名人を広告に起用しない」などです。これは、全社員が無印良品らしさを忘れないようにするためです。

    無印良品に刺激され、よその会社も同じような狙いの商品を次々に出しました。しかし、ほとんどは消えてしまいました。形を真似ただけで、ものづくりに対する考え方があいまいだったので長続きしなかったのです。無印はノーブランドという意味です。しかし、実際には「無印」そのものが信頼できるブランドとして認められているといえるでしょう。

    株式会社良品計画

    文:伊藤公一

    Read More
  • 地域ごとに異なる人の気質に興味

    [From October Issue 2014]

    Eleonora FLISI
    Eleonora FLISI came to Japan from Italy a year ago. She’s been working for the past half a year as a PR representative for a company that manages Italian restaurants and a catering service. Seventy percent of their clientele are Japanese, so she mostly uses Japanese at work. On hearing her speak she sounds as fluent as a native Japanese person, but, she says, smiling awkwardly, “I’m not good at writing. Handwriting is particularly difficult.”
    Eleonora started studying the Japanese language at university. An economics major at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, she chose Japanese for her primary foreign language as the university was well-known for its Chinese, Korean and Japanese programs. “I also studied Chinese, but I chose Japanese because its pronunciation is closer to Italian.”
    During her studies, she twice made use of an exchange program to study abroad at Meiji University. She was surprised at the differences between colleges in Italy and Japan. “Colleges in Italy have neither sport events, nor school festivals. I didn’t have any seminar activities, either.” In those days, she lived in a dormitory and spoke Japanese with her non-Japanese roommate. Even now, she spends some of her days off with friends from those days.
    “I wanted to live abroad while I was still young. I thought Tokyo was safe and easy to live in.” She came back to Japan upon graduating and started life in Tokyo. Even though she had learned enough Japanese in her mother country and had studied twice in Japan, she studied at the Shinjuku Japanese Language Institute for the first six months. “I hardly used any Japanese in my last year in college because I had been concentrating on my graduation thesis. I had forgotten my kanji.”
    She says she finds grammar particularly difficult. When she doesn’t understand something, even after consulting a grammar book, she asks her Japanese friends. “It’s easier to understand because they teach me with example sentences that apply to particular situations.” She has a friend who’s knowledgeable about Italian matters. “She knows what Italians have difficulty understanding, so she fine-tunes her explanations for us.” Her Japanese has improved with help from such friends.
    That said she’s worried she won’t improve her Japanese further. “Starting from zero you make speedy progress. This slows down, however, once you’ve reached a certain level. That’s the stage I’m at right now.” She says she hopes other people studying Japanese in a similar fashion won’t give up.
    Eleonora is interested in food. She likes sashimi and ramen, and often makes yakisoba the way her friend taught her. She of course looks forward to eating delicious food when she travels around Japan. But she has another goal for these trips. “I want to discover differences between Tokyo and the rest of Japan,” she says. This is because she’s under the impression that people’s temperament differs between Tokyo and other regions.
    “I’ve recently been to Osaka. I was taken aback when someone said to me, ‘Where are you from?’ Tokyoites seldom come up to talk to me. Osaka’s citizens are like talkative Italians.” She and her Italian friends compare the lively character of Osaka people to those from Naples and the cool atmosphere in Tokyo to Milan.
    Shinjuku Japanese Language Institute
    Text: ICHIMURA Masayo[2014年10月号掲載記事]

    エレオノーラ・フリージさん
    エレオノーラ・フリージさんは、1年前にイタリアから来日しました。半年前からイタリアンレストランの運営やケータリングサービスをしている会社に勤め、PRの仕事をしています。お客の7割は日本人なのでエレオノーラさんも仕事では主に日本語を使っています。話す言葉だけ聞いていると日本人のように流暢ですが、「書くのは苦手です。手書きだと特に難しいです」と苦笑します。
    エレオノーラさんが日本語の勉強を始めたのは大学生のときです。ヴェネツィア・カ・フォスカリ大学で経済を専攻していましたが、中国語や韓国語、日本語の教育で有名な大学だったので第一外国語に日本語を選択したのです。「中国語も勉強しましたが、発音がイタリア語に近かったので日本語を選びました」。
    在学中に交換留学制度を利用し2度明治大学に留学しました。エレオノーラさんは、イタリアと日本の大学の違いに驚きます。「イタリアの大学にはスポーツイベントも学祭もありません。ゼミ活動もありませんでした」。当時は寮に住み、同室になった外国人の友人とも日本語で会話をしていました。当時の友達とは今も休日を一緒に過ごすことがあります。
    「若いうちに海外で暮らしたいと思っていました。東京は安全で住みやすいと思いました」。大学卒業後に再来日し、東京で暮らし始めます。母国で日本語を十分に学習し、日本に二度留学していたエレオノーラさんですが、最初の半年間は新宿日本語学校に通って勉強しました。「大学の最後の一年は卒業論文を書くのに専念していてほとんど日本語を使っていなかったんです。漢字は忘れてしまっていましたね」。
    特に文法が苦手と言います。文法の本を読んでもわからないときは日本人の友達に聞きます。「例文でこういうときはこう言う、と教えてくれるのでわかりやすいです」。イタリアの事情に詳しい友人もいて、「イタリア人ならこういうことがわかりづらいのでは?とイタリア人向けに説明してくれるんです」。こうした友達の助けで日本語は上達してきました。
    しかし、もうこれ以上日本語が上達しないのではないか?と不安に思うこともあります。「ゼロからだと上達するのも早いですが、ある程度できるようになるとなかなか伸びなくなりますよね。今の私がその段階なんです」。同じように日本語を勉強している人たちにもあきらめないでほしいと言います。
    エレオノーラさんは食に興味があります。さしみやラーメンが好物で、友人から習った焼きそばは自分でもよく作ります。国内旅行をするときはもちろんおいしいものを食べるのを楽しみにしています。しかし、旅の目的は他にもあります。「東京と地方の違いを知りたいです」と言います。東京とそれ以外の土地では気質にも違いがありそうだと感じているからです。
    「この間大阪に行ったのですが『どこから来たの?』とすぐに話しかけられて驚きました。東京の人はめったに話しかけてきませんから。話好きなイタリア人っぽいなと思いました」。イタリア人の友人とは、大阪は明るい性格の人が多くナポリ風で、一方の東京はクールなミラノ風など気質が似た街をあてはめたりもしています。
    新宿日本語学校
    文:市村雅代

    Read More
  • 競技かるたの魅力を広めたまんが

    [From October Issue 2014]

    Chihayafuru
    “Chihayafuru” is the story of a high school girl who becomes passionate about “competitive karuta.” This competition utilizes traditional Hyakunin Isshu playing cards. Selected in the Kamakura era by the court aristocrat FUJIWARA no Teika, a set of Hyakunin Isshu playing cards is a collection of the 100 best waka (Japanese poems) written between the Asuka era (sixth to eighth centuries) and the Kamakura era (twelfth to fourteenth centuries). The set is called Hyakunin (one hundred people) Isshu (one poem) because one poem was chosen from each poet.
    There are two kinds of karuta sets: yomifuda (reading cards) and torifuda (playing cards). Torifuda only have the shimonoku (the second half of the poem) written on them. In competitive karuta, players compete for torifuda. If they can touch a playing card in their opponent’s territory, they can pass a playing card in from their territory to the opponent’s territory. Players compete to eliminate the playing cards in their home territory as fast as possible. It’s a taxing “sport” that requires quick thinking and reactions, since players need to immediately touch the torifuda when the first half of the poem – which is not written on the torifuda – is read out. It is generally played one-on-one but there are also individual and team competitions.
    The story begins when Chihaya, the main character, is in sixth grade. She is proud of her beautiful older sister, for whom she has hopes of one day winning a Japanese beauty pageant. However, Arata, a new student at her school, tells her that this is not a true ambition as she isn’t aspiring for something herself. Arata’s own ambition is to become a top “meijin” (master) of competitive karuta.
    In fact, having won the title of meijin seven times in a row, Arata’s grandfather was an “eisei meijin” (grand master in perpetuity).” Arata has also demonstrated that he’s an able player by winning the national championships each year for his age group from first grade to fifth grade. Inspired by Arata, Chihaya begins to nurse ambitions of becoming queen (top) in the women’s division. She gets her bosom buddy Taichi involved and the three begin to improve on entering the local competitive karuta club. However, after they graduate from elementary school the threesome is broken up when Arata returns to Fukui Prefecture and Taichi enters a private junior high school.
    The story jumps forward four years. Chihaya and Taichi are reunited on entering the same high school. Though the two of them have distanced themselves from karuta during their junior high school years, they start up a karuta club at their high school. Chihaya’s interest in the meaning of these Japanese poems grows. In addition, by strategizing together as a unit, she begins to reflect on what it means to take a card as a team.
    Meanwhile, Chihaya tries to persuade Arata, who had given up competitive karuta, to come back to the karuta world. Because Taichi has taken care of Chihaya since their elementary school days and because Arata becomes aware that Chihaya is a worthy rival, the relationship between the three develops a passionate side.
    Since Hyakunin Isshu is often dealt with in classrooms, most Japanese are familiar with it, but competitive karuta was not so well known. Thanks to this comic, the popularity of competitive karuta has dramatically increased and the numbers of competitors has also increased.
    Text: ICHIMURA Masayo

    [2014年10月号掲載記事]

    ちはやふる

    「ちはやふる」は「競技かるた」に熱中する女子高校生の物語です。競技かるたとは、百人一首を使った競技です。百人一首は飛鳥時代(6~8世紀)から鎌倉時代(12~14世紀)に詠まれた和歌の中から鎌倉時代の公家、藤原定家が優れた100首を選んだものです。ひとりの詠み手につき一首なので百人一首と呼ばれます。

    かるたには読み札と取り札の2種類があります。取り札には下の句しか書かれていません。競技かるたでは取り札を取ります。敵陣の札を取ると自陣の札を一枚敵陣に渡します。自陣の札をいかに早くゼロにするかを競います。書かれていない上の句が読まれたらすぐに反射して取らなくてはならないので、頭脳と肉体の両方をハードに使う「スポーツ」です。1対1で対戦しますが個人戦と団体戦があります。

    物語の始まりでは主人公の千早は小学6年生です。美人の姉が自慢で、夢は彼女がミスコンで日本一になることでした。しかし、転校生の新から自分のことでないと夢にしてはいけないと言われます。新の夢は競技かるたでトップの「名人」になることでした。

    新の祖父は7回連続で名人になったことのある永世名人でした。新も小学1年から5年まで毎年学年別で全国優勝した実力の持ち主です。新に刺激され、千早も女性のトップであるクイーンになることを意識し始めます。幼なじみの太一も巻き込み、3人は地元の競技かるたの会に入り腕を上げていきます。ところが小学校卒業後、新は福井県に戻り太一も私立の中学校に進むことになり3人はバラバラになってしまいます。

    物語はそれから4年後に。千早と太一は同じ高校に入学し再会を果たします。2人とも中学時代はかるたから距離を置いていましたが、高校ではかるた部を立ち上げます。千早は和歌の内容にも興味を持ち始めます。また団体戦での戦い方を通じて、みんなで札を取っていくことの意味を考えるようにもなります。

    一方で千早は、競技かるたをやめてしまっていた新にまたかるたの世界に戻ってほしいと働きかけます。小学生の頃から千早を気にかけてきた太一、かるたの好敵手として千早の存在が大きくなっていく新。3人の関係は恋愛面でも発展しそうです。

    百人一首は学校の授業で取り上げられることも多く、ほとんどの日本人が知っていますが、競技かるたはあまり知られていませんでした。この作品で競技かるたの知名度が一気に高まり、競技人口も増えました。

    文:市村雅代

    Read More
  • 動物のおしりがブーム

    [From September Issue 2014]

    People like videos and photos of cute animals. Recently many of them have been drawing attention to animals’ behinds. It seems that animal bottoms exposed to the elements are so adorable that they lighten people’s hearts and for this reason looking at them has become a trend. The boom began in Japan and is spreading around the world.
    At Kobe Oji Zoo, Hyogo Prefecture, the special exhibition “Animals Seen From Behind” is being held until October 31. To let visitors learn through experience, the zoo has had plushy versions of animal behinds made. The shape of the buttocks and tail of an animal is closely related to the creature’s way of life. The appeal is that you can acquire knowledge through entertainment. “Since many children like bottoms, we thought we could get them interested in animals by starting with their behinds,” says head of public relations MANABE Daiki.
    Although it started out as a project aimed at children, it’s been popular with adults, too. “On entering the exhibition, the bottoms of zebras, bears, snow leopards and more are displayed side by side. Children are delighted and cry out, ‘Wow, bottoms!’ Many families chat with each other while looking at the exhibition,” says Manabe. Having a photo taken of yourself while wearing a bottom costume is also popular.
    Sekai Bunka Publishing, Inc., released a collection of photos of hamsters’ bottoms titled “Hamuketsu (hamster’s butts) – Cute Enough to Make You Pass Out.” The collection gained popularity through the Internet and sold out soon after it was released. As an unusual Japanese phenomenon, the foreign media, including the Wall Street Journal and CNN, picked up the story.
    Afterwards at the suggestion of a member of staff, Sekai Bunka Publishing, Inc. adopted a hamster named “Sebun-chan” as a pet. “He’s the star of the office and is now popular among the followers, too, because we introduced him on Twitter. There are also many fans of Sebun-chan’s bottom pictures,” says MINAMI Yukako, of the media-marketing department. Responding to calls from readers, such as “I want to see more hamuketsu” and “Aren’t you going to make a sequel?” they are going to release a desktop calendar in late September.
    KAMIYA Hiroko, a housewife who likes reading blogs written by hamster owners, says: “I would like to have a hamster at home, too, but since my child is still small, I cannot do that for fear my child would hit the animal. So I enjoy looking the pictures on these blogs. I think pictures of bottoms are especially cute.”
    As a result of the boom, a site specializing in animals’ bottoms has been created and merchandise is being sold. It’s not only small animals that are popular. Photo collections of the rear ends of birds and large animals are also being published. Creative types are also making bottom mascots out of woolen felt. Variety goods stores are putting on exhibitions of merchandise related to animal behinds. It could be that animal bottoms provide comic relief for tired people. The end of the bottom boom is not yet in sight.

    Text: TSUCHIYA Emi[2014年9月号掲載記事]

    かわいい動物の動画や写真は人気があります。最近は、動物のおしりに着目したものが多いです。動物のおしりは無防備で、その姿が愛らしくて癒されるという理由でブームになっています。日本から始まったこの流行は世界にも広がっています。
    兵庫県にある神戸市立王子動物園では、10月31日まで特別展「おしりから見た動物たち」を開催しています。来園者に体験しながら学んでもらえるようおしりのぬいぐるみを製作しました。動物のおしりやしっぽの形はその動物の生態と深く関わっています。楽しみながら知識を増やせる点が魅力です。「おしりが好きな子どもは多いので、おしりをきっかけに動物に興味を持ってもらえるのではないかと思いました」と、広報担当の真鍋太希さんは言います。
    子どもに楽しんでもらうために始めた企画でしたが、大人からも好評です。「展示室に入ると、シマウマ、クマ、ユキヒョウなどのおしりがずらりと並んでいます。子どもたちは『わぁ、おしり!』と大喜びしますね。家族で対話しながらご覧になっている方が多いです」と真鍋さん。おしり部分の着ぐるみを腰につけて写真を撮るのも人気です。
    世界文化社は今年4月、ハムスターのおしりの写真集「かわいさに悶絶 ハムケツ」を発売しました。写真集はインターネットをきっかけに人気に火がつきました。発売後、すぐに売り切れてしまったほどです。日本での珍しい現象として海外の「ウォール・ストリート・ジャーナル」やCNNでも取り上げられました。
    その後スタッフのアイディアで、世界文化社ではハムスターのせぶんちゃんを飼うようになりました。「会社の人気者ですが、Twitterで紹介したところフォロワーの方にも大好評です。せぶんちゃんのおしりの画像にもファンが多いです」とメディアマーケティング部の南由佳子さんは話します。「もっとハムケツが見たい」「続編はないの?」という読者の声に応え、9月下旬には卓上カレンダーを発売する予定です。
    ハムスターを飼っている人のブログを読むのが好きな主婦の神谷浩子さんは言います。「自分の家でも飼いたいけど、子どもがまだ小さいのでたたいたりしないか心配で飼えません。だから、ブログの画像を眺めて楽しんでいます。おしりの画像は特にかわいいですね」。
    ブームを反映して、動物のおしりの画像ばかり集めたウェブサイトが作られたりグッズが販売されたりしています。また、人気があるのは小動物だけではありません。鳥類や、大型動物のおしりの写真集も出版されています。羊毛フェルトで動物のおしりのマスコットを作る雑貨アーティストもいます。雑貨店では動物のおしりに関するグッズを集めた展示会も開催されています。疲れたときに眺めてほっとする人も多いでしょう。おしりブームはまだまだ続くかもしれません。

    文:土屋えみ

    Read More