歌で日本の心を海外に伝えたい

[From July Issue 2014]
201407-4
TAKEI Ryoko
President of Foster Japanese Songs
Using the western scale, nursery rhymes and school songs produced in the Meiji period (1868-1912) represent a unique Japanese world view. This makes them the perfect tool to promote the beauty of Japan to the rest of the world. This was the reasoning of TAKEI Ryoko, when she took on the role of president of Foster Japanese Songs (FJS).
Takei has been studying singing while at the same time pursuing her academic and professional career. In 2006, she went over to America to get her MBA. While studying at Columbia University, she brushed up her vocal skills by attending a master course as an auditing student at the Juilliard School.
Returning to Japan in 2008, she thought about what she could do for her country, and it occurred to her that she could be active in disseminating Japanese songs to other countries. “In attempting this, I could make the best use of my knowledge of business management and marketing skills, as well as my singing skills. I thought I was the only person who possessed both of these qualifications. And this above all, made me excited,” said Takei.
Before getting started, Takei gave some consideration to how she would capture people’s interest. Takei says: “Japanese melodies, such as school songs, nursery rhymes and classic artistic melodies use the western scale, so they are approachable for non-Japanese listeners. Nevertheless, they express unique Japanese views of the world. If we make an analogy with sushi, for example, California rolls are an original dish made using Japanese techniques. So I thought I would start non-Japanese listeners off with California rolls and then have them move on to norimaki (rolled sushi wrapped in sheets of dried seaweed), namely, the world of Noh plays and so forth.
So FJS was established in 2012, under the slogan of “Transforming Japanese soul songs into global classics.” She keeps herself active and is a member of Nikikai, an organization for vocalists, and sings as soprano on the side.
In the middle of this March, FJS held its first overseas performance at a U.N. event in New York. “I assured the members that everything would be alright, but I was actually very nervous,” says Takei, explaining how she felt before the concert.
After the performance, however, some non-Japanese people were found to have shed a tear. The concert attracted the attention of foreign media and she felt that things had gone rather well. “The next day we gave a concert at a recital hall and I was really happy to see that some of the people who had attended the previous day’s event came with their friends to listen to our songs again,” says Takei.
Takei prioritizes conveying the meaning of the Japanese lyrics. During a performance, she took some time to explain the environment in which the songs were created. Using phonetic transcripts, she got everyone to join in a rendition of “Furusato” (Hometown). She also translates lyrics, but she does this very carefully. “I want to retain an academic appearance. Depending on how you translate it, you can end up with something resembling inferior California rolls. I always take time to make sure that my translation fully reflects the meaning of the original.”
These days, even in Japan, there are fewer opportunities to enjoy nursery rhymes and school songs. “Japanese songs account for only 10% of the songs found in junior high school music textbooks,” says Takei. She plans to hold the same performance in Tokyo that she did in New York and, in addition, to actively continue her efforts at home. Takei says that FJS’s goal is to have famous opera singers such as Plácido Domingo sing Japanese songs in Japanese on their European tours.
Foster Japanese Songs
Text: ICHIMURA Masayo[2014年7月号掲載記事]
201407-4
フォスター・ジャパニーズ・ソングス代表
武井涼子さん
明治時代(1868~1912年)に生まれた童謡や唱歌は西洋の音階を使いつつ日本オリジナルの世界観を表現しています。それゆえ海外に日本の良さをアピールする格好の道具になるのではないか。そう考えたのは現在フォスター・ジャパニーズ・ソングス(FJS)の代表を務める武井涼子さんです。
武井さんは勉強や仕事と並行してずっと声楽を勉強してきました。2006年にはMBA取得のためアメリカに渡りました。コロンビア大学で勉強に励みながら、ジュリアード音楽院マスターコースの聴講生として歌声に磨きをかけました。
2008年に帰国して、日本のために何かできないかと考えたときに浮かんだのが日本の歌を世界に広めるという活動でした。「この試みなら私の経営やマーケティングの知識と歌の技術も生かせます。その両方をできるのは自分以外にはいないとも思いました。何よりも自分自身がわくわくすることだったんです」と武井さんは話します。
武井さんは活動を始めるにあたり、まず相手の土俵に乗せられるものをと考えました。「唱歌や童謡、芸術歌曲の『日本歌曲』は西洋の音階を使っているので海外の方になじみやすいです。一方で、日本独自の世界観を表現しています。お寿司でいうと日本の技術を使いながらオリジナルのものに仕上げたカリフォルニアロールですね。まずはカリフォルニアロールに挑戦してもらってから海苔巻である能などの世界に進んでいってもらえればと思ったんです」。
そうして「日本人の心の歌を世界のクラシックへ」を合言葉にFJSは2012年に設立されました。自身も声楽家の団体、二期会に所属し、仕事を別に持ちながらソプラノ歌手として本格的に活動しています。
FJSは今年3月中旬、ニューヨークの国連イベントで初めての海外公演を行いました。「大丈夫、絶対うまくいくからとメンバーには言っていましたが、実はものすごく不安でした」と武井さんは公演前の心境を語ります。
しかし公演を終えてみると涙する外国人の姿があり、各国のメディアからも注目され手ごたえは十分にありました。「翌日はリサイタルホールでもコンサートを行ったのですが、前日いらした方たちが知り合いを連れて再度歌を聞きに来てくださったのは本当にうれしかったです」。
武井さんは日本語の歌詞の意味を伝えることを一番大事にしています。公演では曲が作られた背景の説明にも時間を割きました。発音記号を使って全員が日本語で「ふるさと」を歌うというシーンもありました。歌詞の翻訳も行っていますが、そこは慎重です。「アカデミックな面を保ちたいんです。訳次第では粗悪なカリフォルニアロールにもなりかねません。時間をかけてきちんと元の意味が生きる翻訳を心がけています」。
現在、日本でも童謡や唱歌にふれる機会は減っています。「中学の音楽の教科書に載っている曲のうち日本歌曲は10%なんです」。ニューヨークでの公演と同じ内容のものを東京でも行い、国内での活動も積極的に行っていく予定です。「プラシド・ドミンゴなどの有名なオペラ歌手のヨーロッパツアーで日本歌曲が日本語で歌われるようになること」。FJSのゴールを武井さんはそう話します。
フォスター・ジャパニーズ・ソングス
文:市村雅代

Leave a Reply