×
  • 日本で日本語を学ぶ

    [From February Issue 2013]

     

    The best way to learn a language is to live in the country where it’s spoken. In Japan, most learners go to a Japanese language school. Japan has many such schools. And there are a lot of learning materials.

    The Kichijoji Language School in Musashino City, Tokyo, has four terms a year. It has about 100 students, though this depends on the time of year. Courses are run for eight different levels. In addition to these, there are also private lessons and preparation courses for the Japanese Language Proficiency Test.

    “The goal of the Kichijoji Language School is to get you to be able to produce the language that you’ve studied,” says principal TSUCHIYA Iwao. “Teaching only to read or only to write isn’t effective. So we put emphasis on conversation practice where students use what they’ve learned at each level. Living in Japan, they hear honorific language used in everyday conversations. Since it’s hard for them to use such language, they practice it until they can.”

    One good thing about Japanese language schools is that the students can learn about Japanese culture and make friends through school events. The Kichijoji Language School offers excursions for those who wish to participate. Excursions are to well-known spots or places where they can learn Japanese history, places like Kamakura or Mt. Takao. Events like yearend parties or summer evening festivals, commonly held at Japanese companies or schools, are also organized. “Sometimes students organize their own trips and invite along classmates,” says Tsuchiya.

    At the Kichijoji Language School, about 20% of graduates go on to higher education institutions in Japan. “Some go to Japanese college or vocational school while others continue their studies in their own countries. We had a student who came to Japan to work after working as a cartoon animator in his country.”

    201302-1-3

    Evergreen Language School

     

    The Evergreen Language School is in Meguro Ward, Tokyo. In addition to running courses for those wishing to enter higher education, the school runs standard courses, two or three days a week courses and private lessons. Though it varies over the course of the year, the total number of students is currently about 20. The school takes part in events held in shopping arcades, holds speech contests and organizes cultural exchanges with private high schools.

    “It’s been 25 years since we founded our Japanese language school and during that time, people from 70 countries have studied with us,” says principal NAITO Sachiko. “Currently we only have a few students because we haven’t been recruiting overseas at study abroad centers.” The Evergreen Language School was founded in 1949 as an English conversation school. “We give lessons that are tailored to suit our students’ needs. In terms of Japanese lessons, five years ago the ambassador to Senegal studied with us every day for a year and a half and after this, ties between Japan and Senegal were strengthened,” says Naito.

    “We had a case in which a German who had come to Japan to start a headhunting business was transferred to our school from the Japanese language department of a famous private university. After graduation, some students stay in Japan to go on to higher education, to work, or to start a business. I’m glad they are active in so many areas.”

    201302-1-1

    Academy of Language Arts

     

    “Since we have students of so many different nationalities, I’ve often noticed a difference in each student’s background and general knowledge,” says KUROKAWA Hikaru who is an administrator for the Academy of Language Arts (Shinjuku Ward, Tokyo). The school has about 100 students and average class sizes of about 12.

    “We offer Japanese language classes that focus on improving communication skills in conversation, in conjunction with using a textbook we have lots of discussions, debates and pair work. I’m happiest when I see students making progress who didn’t speak a word before,” says Kurokawa.

    The advantage of studying Japanese in Japan is of course that you have more opportunities to engage in conversations in Japanese. When you go out, most people on the street are speaking Japanese. Most station names are written in kanji, but they are often also written in hiragana and the roman alphabet. You can practice reading those names.

    Watching TV is another effective way to learn. Advanced learners can pick up common Japanese expressions as well as words that have recently entered the language. Advanced learners can also learn about what’s happening in Japan and study the Japanese way of thinking. Beginners are ought to watching news shows with sign language. As they are aimed at people with hearing difficulties, the announcers speak slowly and the subtitles are accompanied by hiragana text. It’s possible to learn Japanese conversation while at the same time enjoying dramas and animations.

    For those who like to sing, karaoke is another good way to learn. The lyrics are shown on screen. So you don’t fall behind, the letters of the lyrics change color to indicate which part you should be singing. It’s important to choose slow tunes as most new hit songs have many words to pronounce in quick succession and are hard to sing.

    Working full time or part time is also a good way to learn. With your Japanese colleagues, you not only talk about work but also chat, so your vocabulary grows. At work, you are obliged to use honorific language which many foreigners tend to avoid. It is good practice. However, you need to be careful because, depending on the type of visa you have, the occupation you can have and hours you can work may be restricted.

    201302-1-4

    Japanese textbook section at a bookstore / Manga section
    協力:紀伊國屋書店新宿本店

     

    Large bookstores often have a section containing textbooks for learning Japanese in which books for all levels are sold. Those bookstores also stock useful learning materials, such as cards for memorizing kanji. If you go to the children’s book section, you’ll find many easy, useful books such as illustrated dictionaries and picture books.

    Manga are also excellent materials for study. Most manga are covered in plastic film, so you can’t see the contents before buying. Some popular ones, however, come with samples that show what kind of manga it is. Manga cafes stock a wide range of comic books for you to browse. There it’s possible to choose a title based on whether the kanji has hiragana readings and on the kind of language used.

    Kichijoji Language School
    Evergreen Language School
    Academy of Language Arts
    Shinjuku Main Store, Kinokuniya

    Text: SAZAKI Ryo

    [2013年2月号掲載記事]

     

    東京都武蔵野市にある吉祥寺外国語学校では、1年に4学期があります。時期によって変わりますが、生徒数は100人くらいです。レベルは8段階に分けられています。そのほか、日本語能力試験対策コースや個人レッスンなどもあります。

    「勉強したことは話せるようにするのが吉祥寺外国語学校の目標です」と校長の土屋巌さんは話します。「読めればいい、書ければいいという教育ではいけないと思っています。ですから各レベルで、習ったことを使った会話練習に力を入れています。日本で暮らしていると日常会話でも敬語が出てきます。生徒はなかなか敬語が使えないので、使えるようになるまで練習します」。

    学校の行事を通じて日本の文化を学んだり友だちを増やしたりできるのも、日本語学校の強みです。吉祥寺外国語学校では希望者を集めて遠足に行きます。行き先は鎌倉や高尾山など、日本の歴史を学べるところやよく知られている場所です。忘年会や納涼祭りなど、日本の会社や学校がよく開催するイベントも行います。「生徒が自発的に企画して、クラスメートたちを誘って旅行に行くこともあります」と土屋さんは言います。

    吉祥寺外国語学校では、約20%の生徒が日本で進学します。「日本の大学や専門学校へ進む生徒もいますし、自分の国へ帰って進学する生徒もいます。もともと自分の国でアニメーターとして働いていて、日本で働くために来たという生徒もいました」。

    エヴァグリーンランゲージスクールは東京都目黒区にあります。進学のためのコースがあり、その他に一般コースや、週に2~3回通うコース、個人レッスンなどもあります。生徒数は時期によって異なりますが、今は合計20人くらいです。商店街のイベントへの参加やスピーチコンテスト、私立高校との交流会なども行っています。

    「日本語学校を始めてから25年になりますが、その間70ヵ国の方々がうちで学びました」と校長の内藤幸子さんは話します。「現在は海外の留学センターで学生を集めることをしていないので生徒数が少ないのです」。エヴァグリーンランゲージスクールは1949年に英会話学校として創立されました。「生徒の要望に合わせて授業を行ってきました。日本語に関しては、今から5年前にセネガル大使が1年半くらい毎日勉強し、その後日本とセネガルとの交流を盛んにされました」と内藤さんは言います。

    「ヘッドハンティングのビジネスを始めるために来日したドイツからの学生が、有名私立大学日本語学科から転校してきた例もあります。卒業後は日本での進学、就職、起業する方もいます。皆さん多彩な方面で活躍しているのがうれしいです」。

    「さまざまな国籍の生徒さんがいますので、学生それぞれのバックグラウンドや常識の違いを感じることが多いです」と話すのはアカデミー・オブ・ランゲージ・アーツ(東京都新宿区)の事務スタッフ、黒川ひかるさんです。学生数は約100名で、授業は平均12名で行います。

    「会話によるコミュニケーション能力を高める日本語教育を提供していますので、教科書を使いながら、ディスカッションやディベート、ペアワークなどを多く取り入れています。全然話せなかった学生が上達していく姿を見るのは一番うれしいです」と黒川さんは話します。

    日本で日本語を勉強することのメリットは、やはり日本語にふれる機会が増えることです。外へ出れば街行く人たちの多くが日本語を話しています。駅名はたいてい漢字で書かれていますが、ひらがなやローマ字でも書いてあることが多いので、読む練習になります。

    テレビを見ることも効果的な学習方法です。上級者にとっては、日本人がよく使う表現や今はやっていることばなどの勉強になりますし、日本で起きていることや日本人の考え方などを勉強することもできます。初心者は手話ニュースがお勧めです。手話ニュースは耳が不自由な人のためのニュース番組なので、アナウンサーはゆっくり話しますし、字幕にはふりがながついています。ドラマやアニメは、楽しみながら会話を学べます。

    歌が好きな人は、カラオケもいい学習手段です。字幕が表示されますし、歌うべきところの文字は色が変わるので、メロディーと歌詞がずれることもありません。流行歌は早口で歌わなければいけない曲が多くて難しいので、ゆっくりした歌を選ぶのがポイントです。

    仕事やアルバイトをするのもいい方法です。日本人の同僚とは仕事の話だけでなく、おしゃべりもするので語彙が豊かになります。多くの外国人が避けてしまう敬語も、仕事の場では話さなくてはならないので、いい訓練になります。ただし、ビザによって働ける職種や時間が違うので気をつけなければいけません。

    また、大きな書店にはたいてい日本語の教科書コーナーがあって、さまざまなレベルの学習者向けの本が売られています。教科書以外にも、漢字を覚えるためのカードなど便利な教材が販売されています。また、子どもの本の売り場に行くと、イラストをたくさん使った辞書や絵本など、やさしくて役に立つ本があります。

    まんがもいい教材です。まんがにはビニールが掛けられていて買う前に中が見られないことが多いのですが、人気のあるまんがには、どんなまんがなのかわかるサンプルが添えてあることがあります。また、まんが喫茶に行くと多くのまんがが置いてあるので見比べることができます。漢字にふりがながついているか、会話の内容が自分にとって役に立つか、選ぶことができます。

    吉祥寺外国語学校
    エヴァグリーンランゲージスクール
    アカデミー・オブ・ランゲージ・アーツ
    紀伊國屋書店新宿本店

    文:砂崎良

    Read More
  • 非日常を味わう脱出ゲーム

    [From February Issue 2013]

     

    “Escape games” are popular now. They begin with you suddenly finding yourself locked up in a room. To escape within the time limit you have to decipher codes and find special items.

    SCRAP Co., Ltd., the company behind “Real Escaping Game” has organized dozens of similar games within Japan and overseas. Participants go into a locked room full of clues. Though some people participate alone, it’s also possible for couples, groups of friends and other kinds of teams to play. Some teams are made up of family members from three generations, including grandparents, parents and children.

    You can participate if you understand kanji taught in the upper grade of elementary school and possess general knowledge. You can also enjoy the game with others if you can understand a normal Japanese conversation. The most important ability is to be able to think creatively and to cooperate with your teammates.

    Able to solve this difficult game that has an overall success rate of only 10%, NISHIMOTO Yukihiko recalls the excitement he felt during game play, “It is probably impossible for a single person to collect all the clues and solve the puzzle. I found myself cooperating with people who were in the same team, who I’d just met that day.”

    “Real Escaping Game is like a club activity for adults,” says KATO Takao, representative of SCRAP Co., Ltd. Adults rarely get the chance to cooperate with teammates, or to celebrate their joy by punching the air when they reach their goal.

    Recently, some companies use the game to encourage communication between coworkers as part of their employee training program. This is because many employees in large companies might only know each other by sight and not have actually spoken. The Real Escaping Game is becoming the most effective tool to break down the walls between them.

    The Escape Game began life as a popular game for PCs around ten years ago. Later, with the rising popularity of smartphones, it became known as a game that can be enjoyed easily, anytime, anywhere, and now many escape game apps are being made.

    “DOOORS,” which became the number one “free app/game app” in 25 countries is a simple escape game in which you have to continue solving puzzles in order to open the door and escape from the room you are locked in. Since all the clues are either pictorial or symbolic, language is not necessary, and this means that the game can be enjoyed by people from any country.

    Game developer NONOYAMA Koji of 58 Works, has developed popular games singlehandedly. He says, “I’ve created other kinds of games than escape games, but 90% of my ratings and feedback are about escape games, so I feel these are the ones that really resonate with people.” Though 40% of registered players come from Japan, the rest are from other countries.

    SCRAP Co., Ltd.
    58Works

    Text: TSUCHIYA Emi

    [2013年2月号掲載記事]

     

    「脱出ゲーム」が人気です。突然ある部屋の中に閉じ込められるという設定で始まります。脱出するには制限時間内に部屋の中の暗号を解き、アイテムを見つけなければなりません。

    「リアル脱出ゲーム」を主催している株式会社SCRAPは、今までに数十本のリアル脱出ゲーム公演を国内外で開催してきました。ヒントが散りばめられた密室へ入場してゲームに参加します。一人で参加する人もいればカップル、友人同士、グループと様々です。祖父母、両親、子どもの三世代で参加する家族もいます。

    小学校高学年程度の漢字理解力と一般知識があれば参加可能で、通常会話レベルの日本語が理解できれば楽しめます。大切なのはひらめきと、一緒に参加した人たちとのコミュニケーションです。

    脱出成功率が10%前後という難関ゲームをクリアすることに成功した参加者の西本幸彦さんは、「制限時間内にヒントをすべて集めて謎を解くのは、一人ではほぼ無理だと思います。その日初めて顔を合わせた同じグループの人たちと、知らないうちに協力しあっていました」とゲーム中の興奮を振り返ります。

    「リアル脱出ゲームは大人の部活のようなものです」と株式会社SCRAP代表の加藤隆生さんは話します。仲間と協力しあい、目的に成功したときはガッツポーズをして喜びあう体験は、大人になるとほとんどないからです。

    最近ではコミュニケーションを図るためのゲームとして、会社の社員研修に利用する企業もあります。大きな会社だと、顔見知りだけど話したことのない社員が多くなりがちです。いろいろな人と密なコミュニケーションがとれるリアル脱出ゲームは、そんな社員間の壁を取り払うのに最適のツールとなりつつあります。

    もともと脱出ゲームは10年ほど前からパソコンゲームとして流行しはじめました。その後、スマートフォンが普及したことで、いつでもどこでも手軽に遊べるゲームとして広く知られるようになり、数多くの脱出ゲームアプリが作られています。

    世界25ヵ国のスマートフォンの「無料アプリ/ゲームランキング」で1位を獲得した「DOOORS」は、閉じ込められた部屋から脱出するために謎を解いてひたすらドアを開けていくことを目的とするシンプルな脱出ゲームです。ヒントはすべてイラストやキャラクターで与えられるため、言語が不要で、どの国の人でも楽しめます。

    開発者である58Worksの野々山鉱二さんは人気ゲームをすべて一人で開発しています。「脱出ゲーム以外のゲームも制作していますが、評価や感想は9割が脱出ゲームに関するもので、反響の大きさを実感します」と話します。プレイヤー在籍国の割合は40%が日本、残りが海外です。

    株式会社SCRAP
    58Works

    文:土屋えみ

    Read More
  • 日本がかかえる問題

    [From February Issue 2013]

     

    ABE Shinzo’s cabinet was formed after last year’s December election. Japan faces a number of difficulties that need to be resolved and Prime Minister Abe’s abilities will be evaluated depending on how well he deals with them. One problem is that of nuclear power. Should Japan continue to use it? Should Japan abolish it? Public opinion is deeply divided. One view is that nuclear power stations that have been deemed safe should be switched back on for the sake of economic growth and cost effectiveness. The other side believes that human life should be given priority and that the accident at Fukushima proved without a shadow of a doubt that there are no absolute guarantees for the safety of nuclear power stations.

    Pensions have also become a big problem. National pension payments by the working generation go towards paying the pensions of the elderly, but because of the declining birthrate and aging population, the existing pension system is heading for collapse. In short, the number of people receiving a pension is increasing, while the number of those making payments is decreasing. These days more and more young people are not paying, because there is a possibility that they will not be able to receive a pension in the future.

    Japan owes approximately 1,000 trillion yen in debts. The largest amount in the world by far. Because of this the former regime decided to raise consumer tax in 2014 in order to pay for social welfare. However, the stagnation of Japan’s economy is continuing. Many people oppose this and say that if consumption tax goes up, the economy will slump even further which would have a knock on effect, causing corporate tax to decrease.

    As the trend towards globalization continues, Japanese manufacturers have moved overseas in search of cheap labor and new markets. Because of this, within Japan fewer permanent staff are being employed, while the number of temporary and part time workers is increasing. Wages for workers have not increased so their purchasing power has decreased meaning that businesses cannot make enough profit. The government is planning to increase tax revenues in line with to economic growth, but there is strong opposition to this policy.

    Another problem is diplomatic. People are closely watching how the government deals with territorial disputes between China, Korea and Russia. The ruling Liberal Democratic Party wants to strengthen military power, which would mean revising the constitution to make this possible. Other people are objecting to this move, stating that a hard-line stance would worsen relations with these nations. Meanwhile the debate continues over whether free trade agreements, like the TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnership), are in the national interest.

    Invisible Problems

    Now people are keeping a close eye on whether politicians keep their election pledges. Out of the many problems that need dealing with, citizens particularly want to see a decrease in the number of politicians, a wage cut for politicians, as well as a decrease in the number of public servants and a cut in their wasteful spending.

    People’s trust in the media, which often treats politics as some form of entertainment, is declining. There has been criticism of the opinion polls that they carry out immediately after a cabinet member has made a blunder; these give the impression that the approval rating for the cabinet has declined. Some say that this is one of the reasons that Japanese prime ministers are replaced after serving about one year in office.

    Some people say that the problem lies with voters who are either overly influenced by the media, or don’t bother voting at all because they believe that nothing will change no matter who the prime minister is. There is a saying that “the level of a nation’s politics is equivalent to the level of the people themselves.” Critics point out that this saying is applicable to Japan.

    [2013年2月号掲載記事]

     

    昨年12月の総選挙後に安倍晋三内閣が誕生しました。日本にはさまざまな解決すべき問題があり、安倍総理の手腕が問われます。一つは原発問題です。存続するのか、廃止するのか、国民の意見はほぼ二分されています。経済成長やコスト面で安全が確認された原発は再開すべきという意見と、福島の事故が証明したように原発には絶対安全はなく、生命が優先されるべきとの意見です。

    年金も大きな問題となっています。労働世代の年金保険料が高齢者の給付金になりますが、少子高齢化が進みそのシステムが崩れつつあります。つまり、年金をもらう人が増え、支払う人が減っていくのです。現在、支払っている若者が将来年金をもらえない可能性があることから、納付しない若者が増えています。

    日本はおよそ1,000兆円の借入金があります。これは世界で飛び抜けて多い額です。そのため、前政権は消費税を2014年に上げ、社会保障にあてる決定をしました。しかし、日本の景気の低迷は続いています。消費税を上げればさらに景気は落ち込み、結局は法人税などが減る懸念があり、その実施には多くの人が反対しています。

    グローバル化が進み日本の製造業は、安い労働力および新たな市場を求めて海外へ進出しました。それにより日本国内での正社員の雇用が減り、派遣やアルバイトが増えています。労働者の所得は増えず、そのため購買力が下がり、企業の収益は上がりません。政府は経済成長で税収を上げようとしていますが、その政策への反論は強くあります。

    外交にも問題があります。国民は中国、韓国、ロシアとの領土紛争を政府がどう対処するのかを見守っています。政府は自衛力の強化をすすめようとしていますが、それには憲法改正も必要となります。強硬姿勢は関係国との関係を悪化させるとして反対する人もいます。一方では、TPP(環太平洋連携協定)への参加など自由貿易の国益をめぐっての論議が続いています。

    見えざる問題点

    今、政治家が公約を守るのかに国民の厳しい目が向けられています。諸問題の解決には、まずは政治家の議員数や報酬額の削減、また、公務員の数の削減、さらに無駄遣いをなくすことを国民は望んでいます。

    また、政治をエンターテイメント的な手法で報道するメディアへの不信も高まっています。閣僚に失態があるとすぐに実施して、内閣の支持率低下を印象付ける世論調査への批判もあります。日本の総理大臣が就任後に1年ほどで交代するのは、それが要因の一つとの見方もあります。

    そのメディアにあおられて投票する、また、誰が総理大臣になっても生活は変わらないと思って選挙に行かない国民にも問題があるとの指摘もあります。「その国の政治レベルは、国民のレベルと同じ」とよくいわれますが、日本にも当てはまるという評論家もいます。

    Read More
  • 自然を表す芸術を好む日本人

    [From January Issue 2013]

     

    Approximately 80% of Japan is mountainous. Because of its high rainfall, it has abundant moisture and greenery. For this reason, in many places in Japan you can see vegetation growing by the edge of waterways or covering the sides of mountains. And this scenery changes according to the season. This is because there is a clear distinction between the four seasons in Japan. Preferring untouched nature (undeveloped natural beauty), Japanese feel a strong attachment to the bounty of nature and the changes in season.

    This preference is reflected in Japanese gardens too. In traditional Japanese gardens, objects, such as winding brooks or stones, are used without altering their natural form. Trees are also pruned in a way that makes use of their natural shape. The unique characteristics of the Japanese garden become clear when compared to the ruler straight flower beds and streams you find in Europe and the Middle East and the manufactured stones favored in China.

    “In the Japanese gardens that were created by daimyou (feudal lords) in the Edo period (17~19th centuries), we see a characteristic similar to landscape paintings,” says EBINA Makoto of the Cultural Assets Garden Section, Tokyo Metropolitan Park Association. “For example, a small mound is made to resemble the shape of Mount Fuji, or the garden is a miniaturized reproduction of a sorely missed native landscape.”

    “Japanese gardens are designed so that the scenery changes when you look at it from a different perspective,” says Ebina. In this way a slope resembles a mountain path when you ascend it, or standing close to a pond gives you the feeling that you’re standing on the sea shore. “Flowers and trees are planted with the characteristics of the changes in season in mind, so that in spring there are fresh green leaves, and in autumn the leaves show up in beautiful reds and yellows. These gardens are a condensed version of nature,” says Ebina.

    “Another characteristic trait of the Japanese garden is incorporating the topography and trees that were originally there in the garden design. For example, a waterfall is created where the land suddenly drops in height, or if the sea is nearby, seawater is pumped into the garden to create a pond, allowing visitors to enjoy the changes in water levels. When the tide goes out, a sandy beach that had been hidden is revealed,” Ebina says, explaining the special features of a Japanese garden.

    Japanese gardens may resemble untouched nature, but they are very difficult to maintain. “Trees in gardens designed to display beautiful scenery through the foliage, must be constantly pruned to prevent the foliage from getting too thick. In recent years, global warming has had an effect on certain trees, which now grow too vigorously, and flowers which bloomed in the old days, no longer bloom in season,” says Ebina. “Japanese gardens have to be maintained by highly skilled craftsmen. I think we must pass on these skills to future generations.”

    A traditional art form called “bonseki” is a way of creating miniaturized depictions of landscapes with sand and stone on a tray. This is a tradition that goes back several hundred years and there are a variety of different schools, but the basics of the Hosokawa style, which was founded by the 16th Century daimyou HOSOKAWA Tadaoki, uses natural stones and white sand on a black tray to suggest scenery.

    The Hosokawa style uses a stone to represent mountains and white sand to represent a sandy beach, the flow of water, or trees. The sand is placed on the tray with a small spoon and then patterns are created using bird feathers. Once complete they may be kept for a while, but generally they are tidied away by removing the stones and pouring the sand back into a box.

    “Originally bonseki was an art form connected with tea ceremony. It was prepared to decorate the tokonoma (alcove in a Japanese room) in honor of one of the guests at the ceremony, bearing in mind that person’s taste and the current season. So once the ceremony was over, the bonseki was cleared away,” says KOMEJI Setsuko, chairman of the Tokyo Kuyoukai, Hosokawa School of Bonseki. “When I am creating the tray, I can forget other things and concentrate on the art. All idle thoughts fade away and I can free myself from all thoughts and desires.”

    “Originally I liked suibokuga (India ink painting) and the rock gardens of Kyoto,” says Komeji. “I feel that bonseki, which represents miniaturized landscapes with sand, has an affinity with suibokuga. Using sand to represent water and stones for mountains is also similar to karesansui (traditional Japanese rock gardens). Because these representations strip away unnecessary elements, it conversely allows the viewer to give free reign to their imaginations. It gives you the feeling that you are actually there in the landscape.”

    “The appreciation of rocks is a cultural tradition that originally came from China, but the Japanese have adapted this to suit their own tastes,” relates Komeji. “Bonseki is associated with various forms of Japanese culture. We still recreate the same picture that is said to have been created by SEN no Rikyu and when we look at the textbooks from the past several hundred years, we can sense the influence of art and kimono that were popular in the day. These days artists of the Hosokawa School increasingly produce realistic landscapes.”

    Another hobby is suiseki, which is a way of appreciating nature in a stone. For example, spotting a similarity to Mount Fuji in a stone and displaying it for the appreciation of others. “Suiseki is a hobby in which the viewer can give free range to his imagination. One can imagine oneself climbing a mountain, recall a kanshi (Chinese poem) or waka (Japanese poem) about a mountain, and imagine the scene,” says WATANABE Hiroki, the chairman of Nikkei Suisekikai.

    Records of the hobby of suiseki date as far back as the 14th century. The Chinese cultural tradition of appreciating beautifully colored stones was adapted to Japanese tastes so that stones with a subdued wabi-sabi beauty, and stones closer to their natural state were preferred. Currently, there are more than 400 suiseki enthusiast associations in various parts of Japan, and a specialist monthly magazine, titled “Aiseki” (Love Stones), about stones. “There are people who pay money for several-hundred-year-old stones, but I like to go to rivers and beaches to gather stones that appeal to me,” says Watanabe.

    “When I look at a stone, I see a natural landscape in it: mountains in the higher parts and plains in the flat parts. When I place an ornament of a person riding a horse near it, it creates the image of a traveler going through an old mountain side. On the other hand, when I place a boat beside it, the image the stone conjures up changes into a sea shore. Because there are so many perspectives, I never tire of it,” says Watanabe, explaining the charms of suiseki.

    “The hobby we call suiseki has a deep connection with the sensibility of the Japanese which is well attuned to the topography of Japan with its numerous mountains and forests and the changes in season,” says Watanabe. Urbanization is advancing in modern day Japan, but the Japanese feeling of love toward nature does not seem to change.

    Tokyo Metropolitan park Association
    Tokyo Kuyoukai, Hosokawa School of Bonseki

    Text: SAZAKI Ryo

    [2013年1月号掲載記事]

     

    日本は国土の約80%が山地です。また雨が多いため、水や緑も豊富です。そのため日本では多くの場所で、植物の茂った山や水辺の風景を見ることができます。そしてそれらの風景は季節ごとに変化します。日本は四季の区別がはっきりしているからです。このような事情から日本人は豊かな自然やその四季の変化に親しんでいるので、手つかずの自然(開発が行われていない自然)を好みます。

    このような好みは、日本庭園によく表れています。伝統的な日本庭園では曲がった小川や加工していない石など、自然な形のものがよく使われるのです。木ももともとの自然の形をいかすように手入れされます。ヨーロッパや中東に多いまっすぐな花壇や小川、中国で好まれる人工的な形の石などと比べると、日本庭園の特徴は明らか
    です。

    「江戸時代(17~19世紀)に大名(地方の支配者である有力な侍)によって造られた庭園には、風景画のような特徴が見られます」と、東京都公園協会文化財庭園課の海老名誠さんは言います。「例えば富士山のような形の小山を造ったり、なつかしいふるさとの優れた景色を縮小して再現していたりします」。

    「日本庭園は見る位置によって風景が変わるように設計されています」と海老名さん。坂を上るときは山道を行くような印象を受けるように、池の近くでは美しい海岸に立っているような感じがするように、というぐあいです。「草花も、春には新緑、秋には紅葉など四季の特色を出すように植えられています。自然を凝縮した庭なんですよ」。

    「もともとの地形や木などをいかして庭を造ろうとするのも日本庭園の特徴です。例えば高低差がある場合にはそれを利用して滝を造ったり、海が近い場合は海水を引き込んで池を造り、水位の変化を楽しんだりします。潮が引くと、それまで水に隠れていた砂浜が現れたりするんですよ」と海老名さんは日本庭園の見どころを説明します。

    自然のままに見える日本庭園ですが、管理はとても大変です。「木を透かして美しい風景が見えるようにと意図されている庭では、木をいつも手入れして茂り過ぎないようにしなければいけません。近年は温暖化によって特定の木がむやみに伸びたり、昔咲いていた花がその時季に咲かなくなったりということも起きています」と海老名さん。「日本庭園は職人の高い技術によって保たれています。そのような技は今後も引き継いでいかなければと思いますね」。

    自然の風景を盆の上に砂や石を使って表現する「盆石」という伝統的な芸術もあります。数百年の伝統とさまざまな流派がありますが、細川流は16世紀の大名、細川忠興が始めた流派で、黒い盆の上に自然の石と白い砂で風景を表すのが基本です。

    細川流では石で山を表し、白い砂で砂浜や水の流れ、木々などを表現します。小さなさじ(スプーン)で砂を置き、鳥の羽根などで模様をつけていきます。完成した後は、しばらく保存することもありますが、たいていは石を外し砂を箱に戻して片づけます。

    「盆石はもともと茶道と関係があった芸術です。いらっしゃるお客様一人だけのために、その方の好みや季節を考えて用意し、床の間に飾ったのです。ですから終わった後は片づけてしまいます」と細川流盆石東京九曜会会長の古明地節子さんは言います。「打っているときは他のことは何もかも忘れて集中できます。一切の雑念が消えて心が無になります」。

    「私はもともと、水墨画や京都の石庭が好きだったんです」と古明地さん。「ですから砂の濃淡で風景を表す盆石に、水墨画と同じものを感じました。砂で水を、石で山を表すのは石庭の枯山水とも共通していました。むだをそぎ落とした表現なので、逆に見る側は自由にイメージをふくらませることができます。その風景に入り込んでその中に立っているような気分を味わえます」。

    「石を愛でるのは中国から伝わってきた文化ですが、日本人はそれらを日本人好みの文化に変化させました」と古明地さんは話します。「盆石は日本のいろいろな文化と関わっています。千利休が考えたといわれる景を今でも打ったりしますし、過去数百年のお手本を見ているとその時代にはやった絵や着物の影響が感じられます。現在の細川流では写実的な景が増えてきているんですよ」。

    石そのものに自然を感じて観賞する「水石」という趣味もあります。例えば山形の石を富士山に見立てて飾ったり眺めて楽しんだりするのです。「水石は、見る人が自由に感じることのできる趣味です。山の形の石を見ながら、その山に登っていく自分を想像してもいいですし、山を詠んだ漢詩や和歌を思い出してその風景を思い描くこともできます」と日経水石会会長の渡辺浩氣さんは言います。

    水石も14世紀頃の記録に残っている歴史のある趣味です。色の美しい石を愛でる中国の文化が日本人の好みに合わせて変わり、わび・さびを感じさせる地味な石、自然のままの石が愛されるようになったものです。現在、日本各地に400を越える愛好家の団体があり、月刊誌「愛石」など石の専門誌もあります。「数百年前から伝わる名石をお金を払って買い集める人もいますが、私は川や海へ行って自分がいいと思う石を採集するのが好きです」と渡辺さん。

    「石を見ていると、高い部分は山、平たい部分は平野というように自然の風景が見えてきます。馬に乗った人の置物を添えてみると、昔の山里を旅人が行くようなイメージになります。一方、舟の置物を添えると、石は一転して海岸のように見えてきます。いろいろな見方を試せるのであきません」と渡辺さんは水石の魅力を語ります。

    「水石という趣味は山や森の多い日本の風土や、季節の変化に敏感な日本人の感性と深く関わっていると思います」と渡辺さん。近年の日本は都市化が進んでいますが、日本人の自然を愛する気持ちは変わっていないようです。

    東京都公園協会
    盆石 細川流九曜会

    文:砂崎良

    Read More
  • 時代とともに変わる日本の歌

    [From January Issue 2013]

     

    Japanese songs come in many different genres. One type is a genre deeply rooted in the Japanese way of life; simple lyrical songs such as “Sakura Sakura” (Cherry Blossom) or “Koujou no Tsuki” (Moon Over a Ruined Castle), and regional folk songs. For these songs traditional Japanese musical instruments such as the koto (Japanese harp), shamisen (a string instrument similar to the guitar) and shakuhachi (flute) are often used. Another genre is enka, a unique kind of Japanese music, which uses “kobushi” (an accentuated or fluctuating note) to emphasize parts of the song.

    Many enka songs take the theme of thwarted love. The late MISORA Hibari was one of the most notable enka singers, who, since she was a little girl, reigned as one of the genre’s most popular singers. The late KOGA Masao was a famous enka song writer who created hit after hit with his melancholy melodies. The 50s and 60s were a golden era for enka, but, with the rapidly growing economy, new genres, such as “mood” romantic ballads appeared on the scene.

    In addition “group sounds” bands like the Tigers and Tempters appeared and became popular. At the start of the 70s, new folk singers and groups such as YOSHIDA Takuro, INOUE Yousui and ARAI Yumi (present-day MATSUTOYA Yumi) appeared one after another. Songs in which singers expressed their feelings directly were called “new music.”

    In the 80s, charismatic singer OZAKI Yutaka’s cries from the heart resonated with young people and drew a lot of attention. After that many different kinds of artists appeared and the term “J-Pop” began to be used. In 1991, SMAP, a band from Johnny’s talent agency – an agency that has created many handsome idol groups – debuted and became popular instantly.

    In November 2012, the JASRAC (Japanese Society for Rights of Authors, Composers and Publishers) announced the top 100 songs from the past 30 years, based on royalties generated from karaoke and other means of distribution. At number one was SMAP’s “Sekai ni Hitotsu Dake no Hana” (The One and Only Flower in the World). The reason it was so successful was that the song’s message – that you don’t have to become number one and that each of us is the one and only flower of its kind in the world – struck a chord with many people.

    Other Music Scenes

    AKB48 is trending right now. Many female idol groups have been manufactured in the past. In the 70s Pink Lady was hugely popular, in the 80s it was Onyanko Club and Morning Musume, who debuted in 1998, is also well-known.

    There is a TV program that many people watch on New Year’s Eve, namely NHK’s Kouhaku Utagassen (Annual Singing Contest), which has been going since 1953. Male and female singers, or group singers, divided into red and white teams of 25 compete. Teams are selected according to a variety of surveys. Japan’s top singers, from idol group AKB48 to enka king KITAJIMA Saburo – 2012 marked his 49th appearance on the show – perform on the night.

    Of course, many foreign songs come to Japan. What’s called “yougaku” (western music) has also been popular since the era of Elvis PRESLEY and the Beatles. Recently, in addition to western singers, Korean singers are also becoming popular.

    [2013年1月号掲載記事]

     

    日本の歌のジャンルには、いろいろあります。一つは、「さくらさくら」「荒城の月」などの抒情歌や、各地で生まれた素朴な民謡など日本の生活に根付いた分野です。これらの曲には琴や三味線、尺八などの日本の伝統楽器がよく使われます。他には、歌の強調部分に「こぶし」と呼ばれるアクセントをつける日本独特の、演歌があります。

    演歌の多くは、ままならない恋をテーマにしています。美空ひばりは演歌の代表的な歌手で、少女時代からトップとして君臨しました。古賀正男は、哀愁を帯びた数々のヒット曲を作った有名な演歌作曲家でした。1950年代から60年代は、演歌の黄金時代でしたが、高度成長にともないムード歌謡(ロマンチックバラード)など新しいタイプの歌も登場しています。

    さらに、タイガースやテンプターズなどの「グループサウンド」が台頭し、人気となります。70年代に入ると、吉田拓郎、井上陽水、荒井由実(現・松任谷由実)などフォークシンガーやグループが次々に現れます。自分の感情を素直に表現するこれらの歌は、「ニューミュージック」と呼ばれました。

    80年代には、心の叫びを歌い若者の共感を呼んだカリスマ的なシンガー尾崎豊が注目されます。その後、さまざまなスタイルのアーティストが登場し、「Jポップ」という言葉が使われるようになりました。1991年には美形の男性アイドルグループを次々に誕生させるジャニーズ事務所からSMAPがデビューし、またたく間に人気となりました。

    2012年11月に日本音楽著作権協会(JASRAC)は、過去30年間のカラオケなどで発生した著作権使用料の上位100曲を発表しました。その1位はSMAPの「世界に一つだけの花」でした。ナンバーワンにならなくともいい、一人ひとりが世界に一つしかない花というこの歌は、多くの人の共感を得て歌い継がれています。

    その他の音楽シーン

    現在、AKB48が話題となっていますが、女性アイドルグループは過去にもたくさん生まれました。70年代にブームを巻き起こしたピンクレディー、80年代のおニャン子クラブ、1998年にデビューしたモーニング娘。がよく知られています。

    大晦日の夜に多くの国民が見るテレビ番組があります。それは、1953年から毎年開催されているNHK紅白歌合戦です。さまざまな調査から選ばれた男女それぞれ25組の歌手が、紅組(女性)と白組(男性)に分かれて競い合います。AKB48のようなアイドルグループから2012年で出場49回となる演歌の大御所、北島三郎まで日本のトップシンガーが出場します。

    日本でも、もちろん外国の歌がたくさん入ってきます。エルビス・プレスリー、ビートルズの時代から、いわゆる「洋楽」は日本でも人気があります。最近は、欧米に限らず韓国の歌手なども日本で人気になっています。

    Read More
  • 日本食に欠かせないカツオ節

    [From January Issue 2013]

     

    Katsuobushi, also called dried bonito, is a smoked fermented fillet of skipjack tuna. An essential ingredient in Japanese cuisine, shaved dried katsuobushi is one of the main ingredients in dashi, a broth that forms the base of many soups, including miso.

    First the head of the fish is removed and the flesh is deboned. The fatty belly area is also removed. The fillets are then put in a basket and simmered for an hour to an hour and a half. Bones from the ribs are then removed and the fish is smoked. This action is repeated many times and the process can take up to a month.

    The last step of the process is to cover the fillets with mold and let them dry. The fermentation stage in the process is essential for breaking down the long molecules of the natural fat in the bonito into shorter ones, and this creates the so-called umami flavor. Artisan katsuobushi makers repeat the fermentation stage multiple times until all of the fat has been converted. A katsuoboshi master knows when this has occurred from the softness of the surface of the whole katsuobushi, as well as from the sound it makes when struck.

    A katsuobushi block has the appearance of very hard, dry wood and is less than 20% of its original weight, containing only 18 ~ 20% water. Production takes from three to six months. In spite of its external dull brown color, once broken, the katsuobushi block is a beautiful ruby red inside. When sold in thin shavings it has a soft color somewhere between pink and light brown.

    Katsuobushi is mostly found shaved into very thin pieces and is mainly used for making dashi stock. However it does come in other shapes and sizes: thicker shavings with a richer flavor can be used for salad or as a substitute for smoked ham in a variety of different dishes. You can also buy whole katsuobushi blocks and shave it yourself for a fresher taste. Thin katsuobushi shavings are often used as a topping for dishes such as okonomiyaki or cold tofu. When used on hot dishes it is also called “dancing fish flakes,” because the flakes move in the steam.

    Before shaved katsuobushi was sold in strong plastic bags, every household had a special bowl for katsuobushi and it was often the job of the children in the house to shave the katsuobushi before meals. Elderly people associate the sound of katsuobushi being shaved with pleasant childhood memories.

    The katsuo fish itself has been consumed in Japan ever since the Jomon period (12,000 ~ 4,000 years ago) but dried bonito was not consumed until later and its appearance and taste have evolved over the years to become the product you can find in stores nowadays.

    Katsuobushi is very low in calories but contains lots of protein, thus making it very good for the health. It is considered to be a diet food and useful for fighting stress. Interestingly, outside of Japan it is also widely sold as a gourmet treat for cats.

    NIHON ICHIBAN

    Text: Nicolas SOERGEL

    [2013年1月号掲載記事]

     

    干しカツオともいわれるカツオ節は、カツオの切り身をくんせいにし、発酵させたものです。カツオ節は味噌汁などスープの基本となるだしで、日本食には欠かせない重要な食材です。

    まず、カツオの頭を落とし、解体し、骨を取り除きます。脂の多い腹部あたりも切り取ります。切り身をかごに入れ、1時間から1時間半とろ火で煮ます。あばら骨を取り除いた後にいぶします。この工程は何度も行われ1ヵ月ほどかかります。

    最後の工程は、切り身を鋳型にいれて乾燥させます。この発酵の過程が、カツオの自然の脂肪を分解させるための重要なポイントです。そしてそれが、いわゆるうまみとなるのです。熟知したカツオ節メーカーは、すべての脂肪がなくなるまで、この発酵過程を何度も繰り返します。カツオ節職人は、それがいつなのかは、カツオ節の表面のやわらかさや、たたいた音でわかります。

    カツオ節は、見た目はとても固い乾いた木のようで、重さは元の20%以下となり、水分も18~20%までおとします。生産には3~6ヵ月かかります。外側は渋い茶色ですが、削ると中身はきれいなルビーレッドです。薄く削って売られるときには、ピンクと薄茶色のやわらかい色になります。

    カツオ節は普通、とても薄く削られた形で売られ、主にだしをとるために使われます。しかし、他の形やサイズのものもあります。半生タイプに加工され厚く削られた風味のあるものは、サラダやくんせいハムの代わりとしていろいろな料理に使われます。カツオ節一本をまるごと買い、自分で削って新鮮な味を作ることもできます。薄く削ったカツオ節は、お好み焼きや冷奴などの料理に、トッピングとしてよく使われます。削られたカツオ節は熱い料理に使われると蒸気で揺れ動くので、「踊るフイッシュ・フレーク」とも呼ばれています。

    厚めの丈夫なプラスチックの袋に入った削られたカツオ節が店で売り出される前には、どの家庭でも削り器があり、食事前にカツオ節を削るのは子どもたちの仕事でした。熟年者は、カツオ節の削る音を聞くと、なつかしい子ども時代の思い出と重なります。

    日本では、カツオ自体は縄文時代(紀元前12,000~4,000年前)以来食べられてきました。しかし、干したカツオはそれ以降からで、長い間に形や味が進化して、現在の製品にたどりつきました。

    カツオ節は、カロリーがとても少ないですが、プロテインを多く含むので健康にとてもよいです。また、ダイエット食で、ストレスを押える助けにもなります。面白いことに、日本以外では猫のぜいたくな食べ物として広く売られています。

    NIHON ICHIBAN

    文:ニコラ・ゾェルゲル

    Read More
  • 日本の気候や風土が育てた、お風呂文化

    [From December Issue 2012]

     

    Throughout Japan’s history there have been many works of art based on the theme of bathing. This shows that the relationship between Japanese people and baths runs very deep. One example of this can be found in the classic Edo-period novel “Ukiyo Buro” (The Bathhouse of the Floating World). A manga series titled “Thermae Romae,” which tells the story of a bathhouse designer from ancient Rome who travels in time to modern day Japan and creates an uproar, was adapted into a movie.

    Some old Japanese words that exist to this day, such as “furoshiki” and “yukata,” are all related to baths. In the Edo Period, a furoshiki was a piece of fabric that was spread out on the floor while changing for a bath and was then used to wrap clothes in. The yukata was originally used as a garment that was worn while soaking in the bathtub. Once people started to take their baths in the nude, as they do today, the yukata began to be worn after baths.

    Compared to the rest of the world, Japanese people are particularly enthusiastic about bathing. One of the reasons for this is that Japan is an island country. Being surrounded by the sea, the climate in Japan is very rainy and when the temperature rises, the level of humidity also rises, making it hot and sticky. It has been said that the culture of bathing in cool or warm water was developed because people living in these conditions wanted to freshen up, even if it was just for a little while.

    On the other hand, there are many famous hot springs, or onsen, around Japan. This is because geothermal heat from volcanoes warms underground streams which bubble up out of the ground as onsen. These hot springs can be found all over Japan, and depending on the elements the water contains, its effect on the body differs from onsen to onsen. Soon spas were developed around Japan to welcome visitors who wished to bathe in the hot springs, places where travelers could stay over in hotels or ryokan.

    Another characteristic of Japanese spas is that they have a strong connection to nature. For example, a mountain onsen will heal the fatigue of skiers, a seafront onsen will have a view of a vast expanse of ocean, and onsen in a valley will have a view of the trees as they change in color from deep green to autumn brown depending on the season. Hot spring spas that develop near places of scenic beauty and historic interest contribute to bringing in tourists to the area.

    Today, “bathing in an ofuro” means to soak in a bathtub. But originally, a bath was a room in which people bathed in steam. So, in the old days, people would scrub themselves off in the steam, and then rinse with warm water. The small rooms that were designed to keep in the steam were called “muro.” This word is thought to be the origin of the word “furo.”

    In the middle of the Edo Period the number of sentou, or public baths, used by people who did not own a bath, increased. The sentou was not just a place where people washed their bodies, but also a place for socializing, a place for fun. Sentou are divided into a men’s bath, “otoko-yu,” and a women’s bath, “onna-yu.” Although some places may be different, up until kindergarten age, it is not unusual for girls to be bathing with their fathers and boys with their mothers.

    When speaking of public baths, many people think of Mt. Fuji as the mountain is commonly painted onto a mural on a wall beside the bathing area. It is said that this is because the shape of Mt. Fuji, with its wide fan-shaped base, is a lucky omen. People also like Fuji for its grandeur and rarely get tired of seeing it. But the biggest reason is probably that it is the landscape closest to everyone’s heart.

    Japanese people love onsen, ofuro and sentou and this passion has led to the creation of today’s “super sentou.” With a variety of facilities under one roof, super sentou quite literally go “beyond public baths.” Entrance fees are higher than for traditional public baths, but these leisure complexes built all over Japan allow visitors to enjoy stone saunas, games, movies, karaoke and meals, in addition to simply bathing.

    In recent years, bathing services, such as the “Hu No YU” scenic bathtub at CHUBU CENTRAIR International Airport (Aichi Prefecture), are being offered inside different businesses. Many travelers have healed their fatigue here. Hu No YU is on the fourth floor of the terminal building, so visitors can enjoy a view of airplanes and the sunset as they bathe. Stepping outside onto the deck, visitors can get a visceral experience as they hear the noise of the aircraft and feel the breeze on their skin.

    Other than the hot springs and sentou, which are facilities to be enjoyed outside the house, there are also products to enhance the bathing experience at home. For example, aroma candles that float inside the bathtub, waterproof radios, and bathing pillows. They are not items to wash the body with, but are items for enjoying and enriching bath time.

    Making bath time even more enjoyable, powders or liquids, that contain ingredients found in various onsen, are now popular. If you add these to your bathtub at home, you can enjoy an experience similar to that in an onsen, and because of this a wide variety of these are on the market. These are convenient because you can enjoy water from different onsen all over Japan every day without going to an actual hot spring.

    201212-1-4

    Bath salts /Utase-yu Photo: Rinnai Corporation

     

    Also there is a bathroom heater and dryer (a product that dries and warms the bathroom) with an “utase-yu” function. Utase-yu (hitting water) is a device that pours warm water over the person standing underneath producing a massaging effect. Mounting this machine on the ceiling allows you to enjoy the real utase-yu feeling in your own home.

    Although in many countries showering is a quick and simple way to wash the body, the Japanese like to submerge the entire body up to the shoulders. Soaking in a Japanese bath is also effective way to revive the body. In a Japanese bathtub you can slowly warm your body up in winter. Developed in accordance with the country’s unique climate and geography, bathing is an exceptional part of Japanese culture.

    CHUBU CENTRAIR International Airport

    Text: ITO Koichi

    [2012年12月号掲載記事]

     

    日本には昔から、お風呂を題材とする作品が数多くあります。それは、日本人とお風呂との関係が非常に深いことを物語っています。江戸時代の人々の暮らしをいきいきと表した古典文学「浮世風呂」は代表例です。古代ローマの浴室設計技師が現代の日本にタイムスリップして巻き起こす騒動を描いたまんが「テルマエ・ロマエ」は映画にもなりました。

    古くからある日本の言葉の「ふろしき」や「ゆかた」などは、どちらもお風呂に関連する品物から生まれました。ふろしきは江戸時代、着替えのときにしいたり、脱いだ衣類を包んだりするために使った布のことです。ゆかたはもともと、お風呂に入るときに着ていた着物です。現在のようにはだかで入浴するようになると、入浴後の外出着となりました。

    日本人は世界の中でも特にお風呂好きです。その理由は、日本が島国であることに関係があります。日本の気候の特徴は、周りを海に囲まれているために雨が多く、気温も湿度も高い高温多湿であることです。そのような環境で暮らしていると、少しでもさっぱりしたいという気持ちが高まるので、水や湯を浴びる文化が育ったといわれています。

    一方、日本には有名な温泉地がたくさんあります。各地にある火山の地熱で温められた水が温泉となってわき出ているからです。温泉は全国的に広がっており、その成分や効き目によって、温泉地ごとの特徴があります。こうして、温泉を目当てにした旅行者を迎えるため、各地に温泉地が発達し、旅行者を泊めるための宿や旅館も生まれました。

    自然とのつながりが強いのも日本の温泉地の特徴です。例えば、スキー客の疲れをいやす山の温泉、広大な海原を眺めながら入る海の温泉、新緑や紅葉など季節ごとの木々の変化が楽しめる峡谷の温泉などがあります。また、名所旧跡の近くに発達した温泉は観光客を集めるための場所としても役立っています。

    現代では、お風呂に入るといえば、湯船につかることを意味します。しかし、もともとは蒸気を浴びる蒸し風呂のことを指していました。ですから、昔は蒸気で体の汚れをこすり出し、その後に湯で洗い流していました。蒸気を逃がさないように造られた狭い部屋を室といいました。それが「風呂」の語源とされています。

    江戸時代の中頃になり、自宅にお風呂のない人たちが利用する銭湯が増えました。銭湯は単に体を洗う場所ではなく、社交や娯楽の場としても使われるようになりました。銭湯は男が入る「男湯」と女が入る「女湯」に分けられます。場所によって違いますが、幼稚園児くらいまでは父親と女の子、母親と男の子が一緒に入ることも珍しくありません。

    銭湯といえば、富士山の絵を思い浮かべる人が多いほど、浴場内の壁画には富士山が描かれています。これは、富士山の裾野が末広がりで縁起が良いこと、雄大であること、毎日見ていても見飽きることが少ないからだといわれています。しかし、最も大きな理由は、誰にとっても親しみのある風景だからでしょう。

    温泉好き、お風呂好き、銭湯好きという日本人の特徴は今日「スーパー銭湯」を生み出すまでに進化しました。スーパー銭湯は「銭湯を超えた」という意味の複合型の施設です。一般の銭湯よりも料金は割高ですが、入浴ばかりでなく、岩盤浴やゲーム、映画、カラオケ、食事なども楽しめる総合レジャー施設として全国各地に造られています。

    最近は中部国際空港(愛知県)の展望風呂「風の湯」のように、業種の違う施設の中で営業するケースも増えています。多くの旅行客がここで旅の疲れをいやしています。風の湯は旅客ターミナルビルの4階にあるため、飛行機や夕日を眺めながら入浴を楽しめます。屋外デッキに出れば、飛行機の音や海風などを直接感じることができます。

    温泉地や銭湯など、外で楽しむお風呂ばかりでなく、家庭の内風呂を楽しむためのグッズも登場しています。例えば、湯船に浮かべて使うアロマキャンドル、防水型のラジオ、お風呂用枕など、さまざまなアイテムがあります。いずれも体を洗うためではなく、お風呂で過ごす時間を楽しんだり、豊かにしたりするのが目的です。

    お湯そのものを楽しむために、全国の特徴ある温泉の成分を再現して粉末や液状にした入浴剤もよく使用されます。これらを家庭の風呂に入れれば、本物の温泉と同じような気分を手軽に味わえるので、多くの種類が出回っています。わざわざ本当の温泉地に行かなくても、毎日全国の温泉気分を楽しむことができるのは便利です。

    また、温泉や銭湯にある「うたせ湯」のしくみを取り入れた浴室暖房乾燥機(浴室を暖めたり乾燥させたりする製品)もあります。うたせ湯は上から落ちてくるお湯を下にいる人の体に当てるもので、マッサージの効果があります。この機械を天井に取り付ければ、自宅のお風呂で本物のうたせ湯の気分や効き目などを味わうことができます。

    体を洗うとき、シャワーで簡単にすませる国が多いですが、たっぷりの湯に肩までつかるのは日本ならではの方法です。湯船につかる日本式のお風呂はリフレッシュにも効果的です。冬はじっくりと温まるのに便利な日本のお風呂は、独特の気候と風土によって育まれた、りっぱな日本文化の一つです。

    中部国際空港

    文:伊藤公一

    Read More
  • 日本の天皇の存在とその歴史

    [From December Issue 2012]

     

    In Japan, December 23 is the Emperor’s Birthday and a national holiday. On this day citizens can visit the Emperor at the Imperial Palace to give him their good wishes. The Emperor and royal family greet them from their balcony. The same ceremony takes place on January 2 to celebrate the New Year. At present the Emperor is well-liked by citizens in his symbolic role as the representative of the Japanese people.

    In Japan in addition to the Western calendar, there is a unique way of numbering years that reflects the period of the Emperor’s reign. This year is “Heisei 24.” This means that it has been 24 years since the current Emperor’s accession to the throne. Before “Heisei” was “Showa.” Before that was “Taisho” and the even further back was “Meiji.” Japan’s modernization started with the Meiji period, when the Emperor held the highest rank in the nation, with all citizens as his subjects.

    In the Showa era Japan had set its sights on becoming a military power and the Emperor was worshipped by the people as a god. After the Second World War, except for attending important national ceremonies and extending royal diplomacy, Emperors have not been involved in politics. However, the Emperor is still considered to be special and sacred. The media uses respectful language when they write articles about the Emperor. It is taboo to criticize the Emperor.

    This year marks the 1300th year since the “Kojiki” (the Record of Ancient Matters), which is believed to be the Japan’s oldest book, was created. The origins of Japan and its emperors, including Emperor Jinmu, who was regarded as Japan’s first Emperor, is described in the Kojiki. In the Kojiki the emperor is depicted as being the descendent of the gods, but many scholars believe that this was written by the rulers of that time to legitimize their own government, thus making it doubtful whether early emperors actually existed or not. However, it has been proved that the Emperor’s family bloodline can be traced back for more than 1500 years, giving it the longest lineage in the world.

    The next Emperor in line is the Crown Prince (the Emperor’s eldest son), but there has been some debate about who comes after that. The Crown Prince’s only child is a girl. His younger brother, Prince Akishinonomiya, has a boy. Japanese Emperors have traditionally been male, though some female Emperors existed in the distant past. Some people say that women should be allowed to become Emperor, but others feel strongly that only men should be Emperors.

    Emperors at Turning Points in Japanese History

    The 16th Emperor Nintoku

    In Sakai City, Osaka Prefecture, is the Daisen Burial Mound, one of the world’s largest tombs. This is said to be the mausoleum of fourth century Emperor Nintoku, who is known for improving the quality of life of his citizens with such policies as instigating a three year tax free period. However, it is a mystery why such huge tombs suddenly appeared in the ancient era.

    The 77th Emperor Goshirakawa

    In the 12th century Goshirakawa, with the support of the Heike and Genji samurai clans, was victorious in his battle to succeed as Emperor. By skillfully manipulating these two rising samurai powers, he struggled to maintain his rule as Emperor. This, however, was one of the biggest factors that lead to a feudal government replacing the aristocracy.

    The 122nd Emperor Meiji

    In the latter half of the 19th century, a revolution, to restore the Emperor to power in place of the shogun government, took place. As the first Emperor of the new government, Meiji became a symbol of Japan’s modernization. He was enshrined at Meiji Shrine, a sightseeing spot near Harajuku Station in Tokyo.

    [2012年12月号掲載記事]

     

    日本では、12月23日は天皇陛下の誕生日で、祝日です。この日、国民は皇居を訪問して天皇陛下を祝福することができます。天皇陛下および皇族はバルコニーに出られてそれに応えます。同様の儀式は新年を祝う1月2日にも行われます。現在、天皇は国民の象徴として国民から慕われています。

    日本では、西暦とは別に天皇の在位を表す独自の年号が使われています。今年は平成24年です。現在の天皇(平成)になって24年という意味です。「平成」の前は「昭和」、その前は「大正」、さらにその前は「明治」と呼ばれます。日本の近代化は明治天皇の時代から始まりましたが、天皇は国の最高位にあり、国民は天皇の民という位置づけでした。

    軍事大国を目指していた昭和の時代には天皇は神様として崇められていましたが、第二次世界大戦後は、大切な行事の儀式や皇室外交などを除き、天皇は政治に関与していません。しかし天皇は今でも特別で神聖な存在です。メディアは天皇について記述するときには尊敬語を用います。天皇を批判することはタブーです。

    今年は日本で最も古い歴史書である「古事記」が誕生してちょうど1300年にあたります。古事記には日本の初代の天皇とする神武天皇をはじめ、日本誕生と天皇について書かれています。古事記は、天皇を神の子孫としていますが、多くの学者は当時の支配者がその統治を正統化するために書かれたとし、初期の頃の天皇が実在していたかは疑問がもたれています。しかし、天皇家の系図は1500年以上続いているのは明らかで、世界で最も長い系図を持っています。

    次の天皇は皇太子さま(天皇の長男)が継ぎますが、その次の天皇については論議があります。皇太子さまには子どもが一人いらっしゃいますが、女の子です。弟の秋篠宮さまには男の子がいらっしゃいます。昔には女性の天皇も存在しましたが、日本の天皇は伝統的に男性です。女性も天皇を継ぐことができるようにすべきとの意見がある一方、男性が継ぐべきとの強い意見もあります。

    歴史の転換期となった天皇

    第16代 仁徳天皇

    大阪府堺市に大仙陵古墳と呼ばれる世界最大級の巨大な墓があります。これは4世紀に、税金を3年間無税にするなど民の生活の向上に尽くした天皇として知られる仁徳天皇の墓とされています。一方、なぜこのような巨大な墓が古代に突然出現したのか謎です。

    第77代 後白河天皇

    12世紀、後白河天皇は後継者争いに勝ち天皇となりましたが、それを支えたのは武士集団の平家と源氏でした。台頭してきたこの二大武士勢力を巧みに操り、天皇の支配を維持しようとしました。しかし結果的に、貴族に代わって日本に武家政治が誕生する大きな要因となりました。

    第122代 明治天皇

    19世紀の後半、将軍の政権から天皇の政権に復古しようとする革命が起きました。新政権での最初の天皇で、明治は日本の近代化の象徴となりました。東京・原宿駅近くにある観光スポット、明治神宮には明治天皇がまつられています。

    Read More
  • 日本の和紙

    [From December Issue 2012]

     

    The tradition of Japanese Paper or washi (wa meaning Japanese and shi meaning paper) originated in China and was introduced to Japan through Buddhism. Paper making began during the Nara Period (8th century) and continued to develop gradually. But it is mostly during the Edo period (17 ~ 19th century) that Japanese paper became really popular, when it began to be sold all over Japan and new types of washi appeared. The production of paper became a part-time job during winter in farming villages.

    Washi is the general term used to describe handmade paper made with traditional Japanese techniques. One of the biggest differences in the production processes, compared to normal wood pulp paper, is that the process requires little or no chemicals. Most Japanese paper is made in winter when pure, cold running water, essential to the process, is abundantly available. The cold water inhibits the growth of bacteria that might spoil the paper. The result is a paper that usually is sturdier and more durable than normal paper.

    Washi is mostly made from the bark of gampi, mitsumata or kozo (paper mulberry) trees. Washi made from bamboo, hemp, rice, or wheat can also be found, but in smaller amounts and is mostly produced for specialized purposes.

    The kozo tree is indigenous to the south of Japan. As it is known for producing strong fibers, it has also been used to create textiles. Mitsumata is a type of bush native to China that has been used for papermaking in Japan since the 17th century. With its ivory color and fine surface it is especially suitable for making calligraphy paper, but was also used to make paper money during the Meiji period (19 ~ 20th century). The gampi tree is found in the mountains of Japan. Japanese paper made of gampi fibers is very rare and very expensive. Mainly used for books and artisanal crafts, it has a natural reddish cream color and a smooth, shiny surface.

    At the beginning of the production process branches are pruned, steamed, dried and stripped of their bark. The fibers are then boiled in water to remove starch, fat and tannin. Then it is rinsed in cold running water to remove any impurities. The remaining non-fibrous material is removed by hand. Wet balls of fiber are scooped onto a screen and shaken to distribute the fibers evenly. After drying the fibers, the washi is ready and it only needs to be sorted and cut.

    Echizen (present day eastern side of Fukui Prefecture) paper dates back to the 15th century and is named after the region that produces it. Echizen is one of the most famous regions for paper production and its papermaking tradition was recognized as a traditional Japanese craft in 1976. Often used to create Japanese style lanterns, umbrellas or shoji screens, Mino (present day Gifu Prefecture) paper was first mentioned in the 14th century and is famous for its durability.

    Ieda Paper Craft was established in 1889 in Mino City, Gifu Prefecture and now owned by the fourth generation of the IEDA family. They become well known for their “1/100” brand that combines paper craft with art. One of their most successful products is their paper snowflakes. The blurry borders of the Japanese paper are reminiscent of the structure of snow crystals, giving them a beautiful and realistic look. They are used as window decorations and, rather than having to use glue, will adhere to glass with just water. They can be removed and reused many times. Easy to use, ecological and safe for children, these paper snowflakes are the perfect decoration for the winter season.

    NIHON ICHIBAN

    Text: Nicolas SOERGEL

    [2012年12月号掲載記事]

     

    和紙の製法は中国から始まり、仏教と共に日本にもたらされました。奈良時代(8世紀)に伝わった和紙は徐々に改良を重ねてきましたが、江戸時代(17~19世紀)にもっとも一般に広まりました。日本中で売られるようになり、新しいタイプの和紙も創造されました。そして和紙作りが農村の冬季の副収入となりました。

    和紙は一般的に日本の伝統技法を使った手作りの紙のことを示します。パルプの紙と大きく異なる点の一つに製造工程があります。和紙の製造に薬品は必要なく、使用してもごく少量です。和紙のほとんどは、製造に必要なすんだ冷たい水が豊富にある冬の季節に作られます。冷たい水は和紙をむしばむバクテリアの成長を抑える効果があり、その結果、普通の紙より丈夫で長持ちする紙ができます。

    和紙のほとんどが、ガンピ、ミツマタ、あるいはコウゾ(紙用の桑)の木の皮から作られます。竹や麻、米、麦から作られた和紙も少し見られますが、ほとんどが特別な目的のために作られます。

    コウゾは日本の南部が原産の植物です。強い繊維として知られ、織物にも使われています。ミツマタは中国原産の低い木で、日本では17世紀以来使われています。象牙色で表面がなめらかなことから、特に習字の紙に適していますが、明治時代(19~20世紀)には紙幣としても使われました。ガンピは、日本の山にある植物です。ガンピの繊維から作られた和紙はとても少ないので、大変高価です。天然の赤みがかったクリーム色で表面はなめらかで光沢があり、本や職人が作る工芸品に使われます。

    製造するには、まず枝を刈り、樹皮を蒸して、乾かした後にむきます。次に繊維を沸騰した湯に入れて、でんぷん、油脂、タンニンを取り除き、冷たい水流にさらして不純物を除きます。残った非繊維物は手で取ります。湿った繊維の玉をすき船の中で均一に分散させて、すきすの上にすくい上げ、繊維が均等になるようにゆすります。このすきあげた繊維を乾燥して和紙は完成します。その後に必要なサイズに切ります。

    越前(現在の福井県東部)和紙の名は地名からつけられ、その生産は15世紀にさかのぼります。越前は有名な和紙の生産地の一つで、1976年には日本の伝統工芸品として認められました。美濃(現在の岐阜県)紙についての最初の記述は14世紀にあり、耐久性の高い和紙として知られ、提灯、傘、障子などに使われています。

    家田紙工株式会社は、1889年に岐阜県美濃市で設立され、現在のオーナーは家田家の四代目です。アートとクラフトを結びつけた「1/100ブランド」で知られています。最も成功した製品は紙のスノーフレーク(雪の結晶)です。境目がはっきりしない和紙は本物の雪の結晶のようで、きれいに見えます。窓の飾りとして使われ、のりなしで水だけでガラスにつきます。取り外しができ、何回でも使えます。簡単に使えてエコで子どもにも害がありません。これらの紙の結晶は冬の季節の素晴らしいデコレーションです。

    NIHON ICHIBAN

    文:ニコラ・ゾェルゲル

    Read More
  • 現代の招き猫

    [From November Issue 2012]

     

    Figurines of ceramic cats are often displayed in Japanese stores. These cats sit with one paw, or both paws, raised to their ears. This engimono (talisman or lucky charm) is a “maneki neko” (literally a beckoning cat). The raised paw of the maneki neko resembles a gesture used by Japanese to beckon someone over. That is why the maneki neko is said to bring in customers and good fortune.

    Cats used to be kept in Japanese farming villages in order to prevent mice from spoiling the rice harvest. Furthermore, Japanese believe that animals can also become gods and even cats are worshipped in some shrines and temples. It’s thought that these customs are the origins of maneki neko. These days cute cats can become famous and a recent phenomenon is the sight of maneki neko promoting a locality or company.

    In Wakayama Prefecture, there is a cat who became a real life maneki neko for the local railway and the local community. The cat, owned by Wakayama Electric Railway, is named Tama, a common name for cats in Japan. Tama is the official station master of Kishi Station on the Kishigawa Line and is an executive board member of Wakayama Electric Railway. She has been given the title “Wakayama de Knight,” so she is now Lady Tama.

    Lady Tama was originally taken care of by the owner of a newsstand that stood adjacent to Kishi Station. When the Kishigawa Line changed hands, the owner of the newsstand asked the new president to, “Permit Tama to live in the station house since she will no longer have a place to live.” The moment the president met Tama face to face, he was able to imagine the cat being a station master. Moreover, it felt like Tama was saying to him, “I will be the station master, so please help me.” This is how Tama came to be appointed as the station master of Kishi Station, which had been up until then an unmanned train station.

    “Station Master Tama” was a big hit. The mass media covered the story and visitors turned up to see Tama, admiring the way she is so unfazed by humans and her beautiful calico coat. A university professor announced that the results of his research showed that, “Thanks to Tama, Wakayama Prefecture’s economy was boosted by 1.1 billion yen in one year.” Kishigawa Line had been running at a loss and was scheduled for closure, but was rescued by the cat it had rescued.

    “Tama is so popular now that not a day goes by without a tourist bus coming to see her,” says YAMAKI Yoshiko, a spokesperson. “Some people have found work after putting Tama merchandise in the entrance to their home and some come back to say thanks because they found love after meeting Tama.”

    Since Tama is in her twilight years, sometimes her subordinate Nitama helps out. Nitama has calico markings, just like Tama and was “hired” because of her easygoing character. She usually takes care of customers at Idakiso Station, but on Tama’s day off, she serves as “acting stationmaster.”

    There are other instances of cats becoming popular after being used as PR mascots. In order to boost their company profile, “Jalan,” a travel information website operated by Recruit Lifestyle Co., Ltd., adopted a cat named “Nyalan” as their company mascot. Commercials showing Nyalan going on a trip became so popular that DVDs were released. Nyalan has even started his own Twitter account.

     

    Recently, Nyalan has an apprentice and a commercial showing the two of them going on a trip together has been getting a lot of attention. This was the trigger for the number of his Twitter followers to reach over 40,000 in a month, making the Nyalan phenomenon topical as far away as China.

    “Nyalan currently has about 60,000 followers on his Twitter account. You can get a sense of just how popular Nyalan is by looking at the number of comments and retweets made by his followers,” says MIYASHITA Maiko, a member of the editorial department. “The first DVD was very well-received, so we are planning a second one.”

    Cats from Tashiro Island are contributing towards the restoration effort after the Tohoku Earthquake. Located in Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture, about 70 people live on this 3.14 square kilometer island. In rural areas and isolated islands in Japan, aging and depopulation is a big worry, Tashiro Island is no exception. The island’s main industry is fishing, especially net fishing and oyster farming, but with an elderly population of around 80%, the island was in need of revitalization.

    To the surprise of the Tashiro islanders, the past few years has brought an increase in the number of camera toting tourists. Because the island has a tradition of respecting cats it has a neko jinja, or cat shrine, where cats are worshipped, and the fishermen have a habit of feeding fish unfit for sale to the cats. As a result, the cat population soared and the media picked up the story of “the island with a larger population of cats than humans,” bringing cat enthusiasts to the island.

     

    There were some residents who disliked the tourists’ lack of manners. But a few saw an opportunity to revitalize the island with the help of these cats. In an effort to encourage tourism, they did things like putting up cat-shaped signs. However, just as they were getting started, the island was devastated by the Great East Japan Earthquake that hit on March 11, 2011.

    The oyster farm was completely destroyed by the tsunami. As the area of devastation was so wide, central and local government was unable to decide where to allocate funds for relief. So the islanders proceeded to collect funds for the restoration themselves. They launched “Nyanko The Project,” an investment fund which pays investors a return in oysters after a few years.

    The word “nyanko” means cat. Taking into account the concerns people had about the safety of the cats, they widened the remit of the project to include using some of the money to care for the cats. Investors would also receive cat themed items. In just three months, the project reached its target of 150 million yen. Because they’d collected so much money so fast, they quickly had to stop taking donations.

    “Last March, we registered the project as a corporation. After we repair the oyster farms using the financial aid, if all goes well we will be able to ship oysters to our supporters as early as next year. We are also rebuilding the public restroom which was washed away,” says Chairman, OGATA Chikao. PR spokesperson, HAMA Yutaka says, “Cats in Tashiro-jima are thought to be guardian deities that bring fishermen in a good catch. They are like members of the family.”

    Meiji era novelist, NATSUME Soseki became famous after writing “I am a Cat,” a book based on his pet cat. It is said that an elderly lady in the neighborhood told the novelist that, “This cat will bring you good fortune.” To the Japanese, cats are a cute and lucky animal.

    Wakayama Electric Railway Co., Ltd.
    Nyalan
    Nyanko the Project

    Text: SAZAKI Ryo

    [2012年11月号掲載記事]

     

    日本のお店には、よく猫の置物が飾られています。猫が座って片手または両手を耳の横まであげている姿をした置物です。これは「招き猫」と呼ばれる縁起物(幸運を引き寄せる置物)です。招き猫の手つきは、日本人が人を呼ぶときにするジェスチャーとよく似ています。そのため招き猫は、お客や幸運を呼ぶといわれているのです。

    日本の農村では、米を食い荒らすネズミをとらせるために猫を飼う習慣がありました。さらに日本人は動物も神になれると考えたため、猫を神社やお寺でまつったりしました。このような文化が招き猫の背景と考えられます。現代ではかわいい猫が人気を呼び、地元や企業にとっての招き猫となる現象が見られます。

    和歌山県には、ローカル線や地元にとっての招き猫となった猫がいます。日本では猫に「たま」と名づけることが多いのですが、この和歌山電鐵株式会社の猫も「たま」といいます。貴志川線貴志駅の正式な駅長で和歌山電鐵の執行役員でもあり、和歌山県からも「和歌山でナイト」など称号をもらっている「たま卿」なのです。

    たま卿はもともと貴志駅の隣にある売店で飼われていた猫でした。貴志川線のオーナーが替わったとき、売店の人が新しい社長に「たまの住むところがなくなるので駅舎内に住まわせてくれませんか」と頼みました。社長がたまと初めて対面して目があった瞬間、たまの駅長姿が目に浮かびました。さらに、「駅長になるので助けて下さい」とたまが言ったように感じました。こうしてたまは無人駅でもあった貴志駅の駅長に任命されました。

    「たま駅長」は大人気となりました。マスコミに多く取り上げられましたし、あいに来たお客はたまの人見知りしない様子や、きれいな三色の毛並みに感心しました。ある大学教授は、「たまのおかげで1年に約11億円の経済効果が和歌山県内にもたらされた」と調査発表しました。赤字で廃止の予定だった貴志川線は、助けた猫に助けられたのです。

    「たまにあうための観光バスが来ない日はありません」と広報の山木慶子さんは話します。「たまのグッズを玄関に置いておいたら仕事が舞い込んだ、たまにあったら恋が実った、とお礼を言いにわざわざ来てくださる方もいるんですよ」。

    たまは高齢なので、「部下」のニタマにも仕事を任せています。ニタマはたまと同じ三毛猫で、同じく人なつこいことから「採用」されました。普段は伊太祈曽駅で駅長をつとめ、たまが貴志駅を休むときには「貴志駅長代行」をしています。

    猫をPR用のキャラクターにしたところ、大人気となったケースもあります。株式会社リクルートライフスタイルが運営する旅情報のサイト「じゃらん」は、ブランドイメージを上げるために「にゃらん」という名の猫を採用しました。にゃらんが旅に出るCMは話題となって、DVDが発売されたり、にゃらんがTwitterを始めたりするようになりました。

    最近ではにゃらんに「弟子」ができ、一緒に旅しているCMが話題になりました。それをきっかけにTwitterでは、1ヵ月で4万人以上のフォロワーが増え、中国でもとても話題になりました。

    「にゃらんのTwitterはフォロワーが今約6万人います。フォロワーの皆さんのコメントや、リツイートの数を見るとにゃらんの人気を実感します」と編集部の宮下真衣子さんは話します。「第一弾のDVDがとても好評だったので第二弾を企画しているんですよ」。

    復興に役立っているのが田代島の猫たちです。ここは宮城県石巻市にある広さ3.14平方キロメートルの島で、約70人が住んでいます。日本の地方や離島はたいてい高齢化と過疎の問題に悩んでいて、田代島も例外ではありません。漁やカキの養殖など、漁業を主な産業としていますが、住民の約8割が高齢者で、活性化が必要になっていました。

    そのような田代島の人々にとって意外なことに、数年前からカメラを手にした観光客が増えてきました。実は田代島は、猫神社で猫をまつったり売り物にならない魚を猫にやったりと、猫を大事にする習慣がある島です。そのため猫が増えて「人より猫が多い島」とマスコミに取り上げられ、猫好きな人たちが訪れるようになったのです。

    島民の中には観光客のマナーの悪さを嫌う人もいました。しかし猫で島を活性化しようという動きも生まれました。猫型の看板を立てるなど、観光客のための取組みを始めました。しかしその矢先の2011年3月11日、島は東日本大震災に襲われたのです。

    カキの養殖場は津波に壊されてしまいました。国や自治体の支援は被災地が広すぎてなかなか決まらないので、島の人たちは自分たちで復興の資金集めに取りかかりました。そして「にゃんこ・ザ・プロジェクト」という、出資すると数年後にカキをもらえるプロジェクトを始めました。

    「にゃんこ」とは猫を意味する言葉です。島の人たちは、猫たちを心配する声が寄せられたことを考えて、お金は猫の世話にも使うこと、出資すると猫のグッズをもらえることなどをプロジェクトの条件に加えました。するとわずか3ヵ月で目標の1億5千万円が集まりました。あまりにも早くお金が集まったため、急いで募集を締め切らなければならなかったほどです。

    「今年の3月、プロジェクトを社団法人にしました。支援金でカキの養殖場をなおして、うまくいけば来年から支援者の方にカキを送ることができます。流されてしまった公衆トイレもつくりなおしています」と、理事長の尾形千賀保さんは言います。広報担当の濱温さんは「田代島では、猫は大漁を招く守り神だと言い伝えられてきました。とても身近で、同居人のような存在なんですよ」と話します。

    明治時代の作家、夏目漱石は、飼い猫をモデルに「我輩は猫である」という本を書いて有名になりました。この飼い猫についても近所のおばあさんが「この猫は福を呼びますよ」と言ったと伝えられています。日本人にとって猫は、かわいくて縁起がいい存在です。

    和歌山電鐵株式会社
    にゃらん
    にゃんこ・ザ・プロジェクト

    文:砂崎良

    Read More