×
  • ゲームやサムライに興味を持って来日

    [From August Issue 2013]

     

    Alberto SESTI
    Giulia VALENTI

    Alberto SESTI and Giulia VALENTI came to Japan in March and are studying Japanese at TOPA 21st Century Language School in Koenji, Tokyo. Alberto and Giulia are both from Rome, Italy. Alberto played Japanese games as a child and this led to his interest in Japanese culture. He studied Japanese language and history in college.

    Giulia was interested in Japan’s samurai, and she studied karate for more than ten years in Italy. After developing a fondness for Japanese pop culture, including fashion and visual-kei bands, she decided to go to Japan to study. Both share an interest in cosplay. They often cosplay as characters from the popular game “Final Fantasy.”

    “Before coming to Japan, my family and I were worried because the Italian media had reported that the water in Tokyo was contaminated after the Great East Japan Earthquake. But I was relieved to hear from a Japanese friend that these news reports were exaggerated and I didn’t change my resolve to go to Japan,” says Alberto.

    The two of them study at school every day from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Giulia says kanji is the hardest to study. Alberto says kanji is his forte, but he has a hard time studying sentence patterns. In addition to studying at school, they also learn a lot of Japanese by watching Japanese dramas. “I’ve recently been watching ‘Last Cinderella’ and ‘35-year-old High School Student,’” says Alberto.

    Alberto and Giulia live together in Toshima Ward. They spend a lot of time together watching TV and going to their local Book Off (a store selling used books and CDs). “Japanese houses are small. We quarrel from time to time, maybe because we are in the same room most of the time,” they say, half joking.

    On her days off, Giulia often goes to Harajuku and Shibuya. “In Japan there are many people who enjoy all kinds of fashions. I like that it’s acceptable for people to dye their hair all kinds of colors,” she says. Giulia cooks both Italian and Japanese food. “I like things like curry rice, soba, omuraisu (omelet with rice) and oyako-don (chicken and egg on rice).”

    Alberto says he often goes to Akihabara on his days off. “Wherever you go in Italy, the landscape looks the same, but Japan has all kinds of scenery, old towns, new towns. I never get bored.” Alberto says he wants to get a job with a Japanese game developer in the future. Giulia wants to find a job in Japan related to fashion.

    TOPA 21st Century Language School

    Text: TSUCHIYA Emi

    [2013年8月号掲載記事]

     

    アルベルト・セスティさん
    ジュリア・ヴァレンティさん

    アルベルト・セスティさんとジュリア・ヴァレンティさんは今年3月に留学のため来日し、東京・高円寺にある日本語学校、TOPA21世紀語学校で勉強しています。アルベルトさんもジュリアさんも、イタリアのローマ出身です。アルベルトさんは子どもの頃日本のゲームで遊んだことをきっかけに日本文化に興味を持ち、大学で日本語や日本の歴史を勉強しました。

    ジュリアさんは日本のサムライに興味があり、また、イタリアで空手を10年以上習いました。それから日本のファッションやビジュアル系バンドなどのポップカルチャーが好きになり、日本に留学することを決めました。二人の共通の趣味はコスプレです。人気のゲーム「ファイナルファンタジー」のキャラクターのコスプレをすることが多いです。

    「日本に来る前、イタリアのニュースでは東日本大震災の影響で東京の水は汚染されていると報道されていたので自分も家族も心配になりました。でも日本人の友人からニュースの報道が大げさすぎると聞いて安心し、日本へ行く決意は変わりませんでした」とアルベルトさんは言います。

    二人は毎日朝9時から昼1時まで学校で勉強します。ジュリアさんは漢字の勉強が特に難しいと言います。また、アルベルトさんは漢字は得意だけど文型の勉強が苦手だと話します。学校の勉強の他に、日本のドラマを見て日本語を勉強することも多く、「最近では『ラスト・シンデレラ』や『35歳の高校生』を見ていました」とアルベルトさんは言います。

    アルベルトさんとジュリアさんは豊島区で共同生活を送っています。一緒にテレビを見たり、近所にあるブック・オフ(中古の本やCDなどを扱う店)へ行くことが多いです。「日本の家は狭いですね。ずっと同じ部屋にいることが多いせいか、けんかをしてしまうこともあります」と二人は冗談を交えながら話します。

    休みの日、ジュリアさんはよく原宿や渋谷に遊びに行きます。「日本にはいろんなファッションを楽しむ人がいます。髪の毛を変わった色に染めている人でも受け入れる多様性が好きです」と言います。また、ジュリアさんはイタリア料理も和食も作ります。「カレーライス、そば、オムライス、親子丼などが好きです」。

    アルベルトさんは休みの日は秋葉原へ行くことが多いと話します。「イタリアはどこへ出かけても似たような風景が多いですが、日本は古い町や新しい町など、いろいろな風景があってあきません」。アルベルトさんは将来、日本のゲーム会社で、ジュリアさんは日本でファッション関係の仕事を見つけたいと話します。

    TOPA21世紀語学校

    文:土屋えみ

    Read More
  • 日本で日本語を学ぶ

    [From February Issue 2013]

     

    The best way to learn a language is to live in the country where it’s spoken. In Japan, most learners go to a Japanese language school. Japan has many such schools. And there are a lot of learning materials.

    The Kichijoji Language School in Musashino City, Tokyo, has four terms a year. It has about 100 students, though this depends on the time of year. Courses are run for eight different levels. In addition to these, there are also private lessons and preparation courses for the Japanese Language Proficiency Test.

    “The goal of the Kichijoji Language School is to get you to be able to produce the language that you’ve studied,” says principal TSUCHIYA Iwao. “Teaching only to read or only to write isn’t effective. So we put emphasis on conversation practice where students use what they’ve learned at each level. Living in Japan, they hear honorific language used in everyday conversations. Since it’s hard for them to use such language, they practice it until they can.”

    One good thing about Japanese language schools is that the students can learn about Japanese culture and make friends through school events. The Kichijoji Language School offers excursions for those who wish to participate. Excursions are to well-known spots or places where they can learn Japanese history, places like Kamakura or Mt. Takao. Events like yearend parties or summer evening festivals, commonly held at Japanese companies or schools, are also organized. “Sometimes students organize their own trips and invite along classmates,” says Tsuchiya.

    At the Kichijoji Language School, about 20% of graduates go on to higher education institutions in Japan. “Some go to Japanese college or vocational school while others continue their studies in their own countries. We had a student who came to Japan to work after working as a cartoon animator in his country.”

    201302-1-3

    Evergreen Language School

     

    The Evergreen Language School is in Meguro Ward, Tokyo. In addition to running courses for those wishing to enter higher education, the school runs standard courses, two or three days a week courses and private lessons. Though it varies over the course of the year, the total number of students is currently about 20. The school takes part in events held in shopping arcades, holds speech contests and organizes cultural exchanges with private high schools.

    “It’s been 25 years since we founded our Japanese language school and during that time, people from 70 countries have studied with us,” says principal NAITO Sachiko. “Currently we only have a few students because we haven’t been recruiting overseas at study abroad centers.” The Evergreen Language School was founded in 1949 as an English conversation school. “We give lessons that are tailored to suit our students’ needs. In terms of Japanese lessons, five years ago the ambassador to Senegal studied with us every day for a year and a half and after this, ties between Japan and Senegal were strengthened,” says Naito.

    “We had a case in which a German who had come to Japan to start a headhunting business was transferred to our school from the Japanese language department of a famous private university. After graduation, some students stay in Japan to go on to higher education, to work, or to start a business. I’m glad they are active in so many areas.”

    201302-1-1

    Academy of Language Arts

     

    “Since we have students of so many different nationalities, I’ve often noticed a difference in each student’s background and general knowledge,” says KUROKAWA Hikaru who is an administrator for the Academy of Language Arts (Shinjuku Ward, Tokyo). The school has about 100 students and average class sizes of about 12.

    “We offer Japanese language classes that focus on improving communication skills in conversation, in conjunction with using a textbook we have lots of discussions, debates and pair work. I’m happiest when I see students making progress who didn’t speak a word before,” says Kurokawa.

    The advantage of studying Japanese in Japan is of course that you have more opportunities to engage in conversations in Japanese. When you go out, most people on the street are speaking Japanese. Most station names are written in kanji, but they are often also written in hiragana and the roman alphabet. You can practice reading those names.

    Watching TV is another effective way to learn. Advanced learners can pick up common Japanese expressions as well as words that have recently entered the language. Advanced learners can also learn about what’s happening in Japan and study the Japanese way of thinking. Beginners are ought to watching news shows with sign language. As they are aimed at people with hearing difficulties, the announcers speak slowly and the subtitles are accompanied by hiragana text. It’s possible to learn Japanese conversation while at the same time enjoying dramas and animations.

    For those who like to sing, karaoke is another good way to learn. The lyrics are shown on screen. So you don’t fall behind, the letters of the lyrics change color to indicate which part you should be singing. It’s important to choose slow tunes as most new hit songs have many words to pronounce in quick succession and are hard to sing.

    Working full time or part time is also a good way to learn. With your Japanese colleagues, you not only talk about work but also chat, so your vocabulary grows. At work, you are obliged to use honorific language which many foreigners tend to avoid. It is good practice. However, you need to be careful because, depending on the type of visa you have, the occupation you can have and hours you can work may be restricted.

    201302-1-4

    Japanese textbook section at a bookstore / Manga section
    協力:紀伊國屋書店新宿本店

     

    Large bookstores often have a section containing textbooks for learning Japanese in which books for all levels are sold. Those bookstores also stock useful learning materials, such as cards for memorizing kanji. If you go to the children’s book section, you’ll find many easy, useful books such as illustrated dictionaries and picture books.

    Manga are also excellent materials for study. Most manga are covered in plastic film, so you can’t see the contents before buying. Some popular ones, however, come with samples that show what kind of manga it is. Manga cafes stock a wide range of comic books for you to browse. There it’s possible to choose a title based on whether the kanji has hiragana readings and on the kind of language used.

    Kichijoji Language School
    Evergreen Language School
    Academy of Language Arts
    Shinjuku Main Store, Kinokuniya

    Text: SAZAKI Ryo

    [2013年2月号掲載記事]

     

    東京都武蔵野市にある吉祥寺外国語学校では、1年に4学期があります。時期によって変わりますが、生徒数は100人くらいです。レベルは8段階に分けられています。そのほか、日本語能力試験対策コースや個人レッスンなどもあります。

    「勉強したことは話せるようにするのが吉祥寺外国語学校の目標です」と校長の土屋巌さんは話します。「読めればいい、書ければいいという教育ではいけないと思っています。ですから各レベルで、習ったことを使った会話練習に力を入れています。日本で暮らしていると日常会話でも敬語が出てきます。生徒はなかなか敬語が使えないので、使えるようになるまで練習します」。

    学校の行事を通じて日本の文化を学んだり友だちを増やしたりできるのも、日本語学校の強みです。吉祥寺外国語学校では希望者を集めて遠足に行きます。行き先は鎌倉や高尾山など、日本の歴史を学べるところやよく知られている場所です。忘年会や納涼祭りなど、日本の会社や学校がよく開催するイベントも行います。「生徒が自発的に企画して、クラスメートたちを誘って旅行に行くこともあります」と土屋さんは言います。

    吉祥寺外国語学校では、約20%の生徒が日本で進学します。「日本の大学や専門学校へ進む生徒もいますし、自分の国へ帰って進学する生徒もいます。もともと自分の国でアニメーターとして働いていて、日本で働くために来たという生徒もいました」。

    エヴァグリーンランゲージスクールは東京都目黒区にあります。進学のためのコースがあり、その他に一般コースや、週に2~3回通うコース、個人レッスンなどもあります。生徒数は時期によって異なりますが、今は合計20人くらいです。商店街のイベントへの参加やスピーチコンテスト、私立高校との交流会なども行っています。

    「日本語学校を始めてから25年になりますが、その間70ヵ国の方々がうちで学びました」と校長の内藤幸子さんは話します。「現在は海外の留学センターで学生を集めることをしていないので生徒数が少ないのです」。エヴァグリーンランゲージスクールは1949年に英会話学校として創立されました。「生徒の要望に合わせて授業を行ってきました。日本語に関しては、今から5年前にセネガル大使が1年半くらい毎日勉強し、その後日本とセネガルとの交流を盛んにされました」と内藤さんは言います。

    「ヘッドハンティングのビジネスを始めるために来日したドイツからの学生が、有名私立大学日本語学科から転校してきた例もあります。卒業後は日本での進学、就職、起業する方もいます。皆さん多彩な方面で活躍しているのがうれしいです」。

    「さまざまな国籍の生徒さんがいますので、学生それぞれのバックグラウンドや常識の違いを感じることが多いです」と話すのはアカデミー・オブ・ランゲージ・アーツ(東京都新宿区)の事務スタッフ、黒川ひかるさんです。学生数は約100名で、授業は平均12名で行います。

    「会話によるコミュニケーション能力を高める日本語教育を提供していますので、教科書を使いながら、ディスカッションやディベート、ペアワークなどを多く取り入れています。全然話せなかった学生が上達していく姿を見るのは一番うれしいです」と黒川さんは話します。

    日本で日本語を勉強することのメリットは、やはり日本語にふれる機会が増えることです。外へ出れば街行く人たちの多くが日本語を話しています。駅名はたいてい漢字で書かれていますが、ひらがなやローマ字でも書いてあることが多いので、読む練習になります。

    テレビを見ることも効果的な学習方法です。上級者にとっては、日本人がよく使う表現や今はやっていることばなどの勉強になりますし、日本で起きていることや日本人の考え方などを勉強することもできます。初心者は手話ニュースがお勧めです。手話ニュースは耳が不自由な人のためのニュース番組なので、アナウンサーはゆっくり話しますし、字幕にはふりがながついています。ドラマやアニメは、楽しみながら会話を学べます。

    歌が好きな人は、カラオケもいい学習手段です。字幕が表示されますし、歌うべきところの文字は色が変わるので、メロディーと歌詞がずれることもありません。流行歌は早口で歌わなければいけない曲が多くて難しいので、ゆっくりした歌を選ぶのがポイントです。

    仕事やアルバイトをするのもいい方法です。日本人の同僚とは仕事の話だけでなく、おしゃべりもするので語彙が豊かになります。多くの外国人が避けてしまう敬語も、仕事の場では話さなくてはならないので、いい訓練になります。ただし、ビザによって働ける職種や時間が違うので気をつけなければいけません。

    また、大きな書店にはたいてい日本語の教科書コーナーがあって、さまざまなレベルの学習者向けの本が売られています。教科書以外にも、漢字を覚えるためのカードなど便利な教材が販売されています。また、子どもの本の売り場に行くと、イラストをたくさん使った辞書や絵本など、やさしくて役に立つ本があります。

    まんがもいい教材です。まんがにはビニールが掛けられていて買う前に中が見られないことが多いのですが、人気のあるまんがには、どんなまんがなのかわかるサンプルが添えてあることがあります。また、まんが喫茶に行くと多くのまんがが置いてあるので見比べることができます。漢字にふりがながついているか、会話の内容が自分にとって役に立つか、選ぶことができます。

    吉祥寺外国語学校
    エヴァグリーンランゲージスクール
    アカデミー・オブ・ランゲージ・アーツ
    紀伊國屋書店新宿本店

    文:砂崎良

    Read More
  • 人づきあいから学んだ語学

    [From June Issue 2012]

     

    Carl ROBINSON

    New Zealander Carl ROBINSON is the CEO of Jeroboam Co., Ltd., a wine importing business based in Japan. “In the wine business,” he says, “the people you meet are happy to see you.” Being a social animal, he’s just as happy to meet people. A natural communicator, since coming to Japan in 1990, Robinson acquired his language more through immersing himself socially, than studying textbooks.

    “I still think immersion is a good thing because you just have to figure it out,” he says. Robinson originally came to Japan with his wife for a working holiday. One option was to stay in Tokyo as English teachers – they could make a little more money, but maybe experience less of the language and the culture. Instead, they did the exact opposite: for six months they lived as the only foreigners in a small town in Oita Prefecture.

    “It was certainly tough not having anyone to help you, but it was also very, very satisfying once you started to realize that people could understand you.” Robinson admits he’s no “kanji freak” totally focused on studying, so ultimately, the desire to interact drove him to improve his Japanese. “I certainly wanted to communicate with the people I was working with and the people I was seeing every day.”

    After that half year, Robinson and his wife moved to the UK. But they still loved Japan, and six years later they arranged a transfer for Robinson’s wife to her employer’s Tokyo office. Robinson, who had been working in the wine business, found a job as a sommelier for the Tokyo American Club. The timing was perfect. “We came back here in 1996, and it was just at a time when wine was starting to take off in Japan.”

    After eight years of consulting and organizing events, Robinson chose to move into importing. As CEO of Jeroboam, he says, “I needed to improve my formal Japanese and to learn a lot of technical language that I hadn’t been exposed to before.” In deals with bankers and lawyers, he enlists the help of bilingual staff. “Because you don’t want to make mistakes in situations like that.” Still, all internal communications are in Japanese. “It’s important to have your own style, especially if you’re running a company,” he says.

    Robinson’s Japanese has been put to the test under stressful situations. Last March, Robinson was at work when the Great East Japan Earthquake struck. “It was certainly challenging when you’re making decisions that seriously affect other people,” he says. And before that, Robinson faced a crisis of a different kind: the economic shock of 2008. He had to use his Japanese to nurture his employees during uncertain times, both to lead and to inspire. “It really pushes your Japanese ability.”

    It’s situations like these that reinforce Robinson’s philosophy. Relying too much on memorization, he believes, gives too much emphasis on language structures and gets in the way of what you’re trying to say. The best way to learn, for Robinson, is total immersion. His one recommendation for students of Japanese is to go to a place where they can be totally surrounded by the language. “It’s tough,” he says, “but it’s a good way to learn.”

    Jeroboam Co., Ltd

    Text: Gregory FLYNN

    [2012年6月号掲載記事]

     

    カール・ロビンソンさん

    ニュージーランド人のカール・ロビンソンさんは日本に本社があるワイン輸入会社、ジェロボーム株式会社の社長です。「ワインの商売をしていると会う人に喜ばれます」とロビンソンさんは言います。社交性に富むロビンソンさんは人に会うのが好きです。生まれつき話上手のロビンソンさんは、1990年に日本へ来て以来、教科書で勉強するより人とのつきあいのなかで日本語を身につけました。

    「意味を理解するには、今も日本語漬けになるのはいいことだと思っています」とロビンソンさんは言います。ロビンソンさんは最初、ワーキングホリデーのために夫人と一緒に来日しました。ひとつの選択肢は英語教師として東京に滞在することでした。そうしていれば少し多めにお金を稼げたでしょうが、日本語と日本文化の経験は減っていたかもしれません。その代わりに二人は正反対のことをしました。他に誰も外国人がいない大分県の小さな町に6ヵ月間住んだのです。

    「助けてくれる人がいないのは確かに大変でしたが、人に理解されているということがわかり始めると、すごくやりがいを感じました」。ロビンソンさんは勉強のことしか頭にない「漢字狂」ではないと認めていますが、結局もっと交流したいという気持ちが日本語の上達を後押ししたのです。「一緒に働いている人達と、また毎日会う人達とどうしても交流したかったのです」。

    その半年後、ロビンソンさんと夫人はイギリスへ引越ました。でもまだ日本が好きだったので、6年後、夫人が勤務している会社の東京支社に転勤できるようにしたのです。ワイン業界で働いていたロビンソンさんは、東京アメリカンクラブでソムリエの仕事を見つけました。絶好のタイミングでした。「私達は1996年にここに戻って来たのですが、ちょうど日本でワインがブームになり始めた頃だったのです」。

    コンサルティングとイベント開催の仕事を8年間した後、ロビンソンさんは輸入の仕事に移りました。ジェロボームの社長として「敬語をもっと身につけたり、以前は自分に関係なかった技術用語もたくさん覚えたりする必要がありました」。銀行員や弁護士とのやりとりには日英のバイリンガルスタッフの助けを借ります。「そういう場ではミスはしたくないですから」。でも社内の意思疎通は全て日本語です。「自分のスタイルを持つことが重要です。特に会社を経営しているなら」とロビンソンさんは話します。

    ロビンソンさんの日本語は、ストレスのたまる状況で試練に立たされてきました。昨年3月東日本大震災が起きた時、ロビンソンさんは職場にいました。「他の人達に深刻な影響をおよぼす決定を下すのは、確かにやりがいがありました」と言います。その前にもロビンソンさんは別の危機に直面していました。2008年の経済ショックです。ロビンソンさんは不安定な時期に従業員をはげますため日本語を使わなくてはなりませんでした。指揮するため、また元気を与えるためでした。「本当に日本語能力が伸びます」。

    ロビンソンさんの信念を強固にしたのはそうした状況でした。暗記に頼り過ぎると、構文に重点がおかれて言いたいことが言えなくなると考えています。ロビンソンにとって一番良い習得法は日本語にひたり切ることです。日本語学習者に勧めるのは、日本語に完全に囲まれる場所へ行くことです。大変ですが良い習得法だと話します。

    ジェロボーム株式会社

    文:グレゴリー・フリン

    Read More
  • 性別と言葉の壁を乗り越えて

    [From May Issue 2012]

     

    Renee KIDA

    American Renee KIDA is the HR manager at the Kohoku IKEA in Yokohama, Japan. Her job requires Japanese every day, but despite having majored in Japanese, she could say little more than sumimasen (I’m sorry) and daijoubu (okay) when she first arrived. Getting to where she is now took skill and perseverance in the face of numerous obstacles.

    Usually talkative, Kida says her lack of Japanese left her feeling rather lonely at first. She tried taking language courses, but her real breakthrough happened on the job. Early on she found herself supporting a team whose members spoke no English. “Up until that point, I was around a lot of people who spoke some English, so as soon as I didn’t understand they would just switch to English and I never seemed to progress. Working with that team … I got over the psychological barrier about worrying about making mistakes.”

    Similarly, there was a period when Kida found herself responsible for the phones during the lunch break. “I remember my hands being sweaty, and not being able to eat my obentou (pack lunch) as I was so nervous,” she says. So she wrote a script and memorized it. “I learned to handle the phone through practice … Now I often find the phone easier than email.”

    Another obstacle Kida faced was gender roles in Japan. The HR director at her former employer even said once that if Kida planned to stay in Japan long term, she would need to find a Japanese husband. “I had to really monitor my way of communicating to not come across too strong, and had to struggle to be taken seriously.”

    Still, as she saw things, “I chose my job, so I had to figure out a way to still get credibility and make it work for me.” And the status of women was changing, too. “When I first got here it took a qualified woman 15 years to get her first promotion, and there were no women in sales. Not a single one!” These days, though, even the company where the HR director told Kida to find a Japanese husband has a female president.

    Kida’s final challenge was herself. Working in marketing at a medical device company, even with promotions, she felt stuck. So she quit her job, went back to school, got an MBA and also studied more Japanese. All the while she worked a part time job at a friend’s training company. Eventually, though, she began working at IKEA and has moved up over time to her current position. It’s a good company for women. “We have many women managers – close to 50%! And I feel our company culture is very women friendly, allowing us to contribute and grow in many ways.”

    Ultimately, Kida says, “Finding your right profession and, or, place to work is an art or refined skill, regardless of country.” And she seems to have mastered that art; in her heart, she loves her life here and says that she is grateful for it.

    IKEA

    Text: Gregory FLYNN

    [2012年5月号掲載記事]

     

    来田ルネさん

    アメリカ人の来田ルネさんは、横浜にあるイケア港北の人事部長です。来田さんの仕事には毎日日本語が必要ですが、大学では日本語専攻だったにもかかわらず、日本に来たときには「すみません」と「大丈夫」くらいしか話せませんでした。来田さんが今日に至るまでには、多くの障害を前に技能と忍耐が必要でした。

    来田さんは話し好きですが、最初は日本語が話せなかったので少しさみしかったと言います。日本語コースも取ってみましたが、突破口を見つけたのは職場でした。最初の頃は、英語を話せない人達のチームを支援することでした。「そのときまでは多少英語が話せる人達がまわりにたくさんいました。ですから、わからないことがあるとすぐに英語に変えてくれましたので全然進歩していないような気がしていました。あのチームと仕事をするようになってからは……。間違いを恐れる心理的な壁を乗り越えられたのです」。

    また、昼休みの時間に電話番を任された時期がありました。「緊張のあまり手が汗ばんでお弁当が食べられなかったのを覚えています」と来田さんは言います。そのため、言うべき言葉を書いて暗記しました。「練習をかさね、電話の応対ができるようになったのです……。今ではメールより電話の方が楽だと思うことがよくあります」。

    来田さんが直面したもうひとつの壁は、日本における男女のあり方でした。以前の勤め先の人事部長から、日本に長期滞在するつもりなら日本人の夫を見つけなさいとさえ言われました。「押しが強過ぎると思われないよう話し方には本当に気をつけなくてはならず、まともに相手にしてもらうのに苦労しました」。

    それでも、来田さんは「自分が選んだ仕事ですから、人に信頼されてうまくいくようなやり方を見つけなくてはいけなかったのです」と受け止めました。また、女性の地位も変わりつつありました。「私が初めて来た頃は、実力のある女性が最初の昇進を受けるまで15年かかっていましたし、営業に女性はいませんでした。一人もです!」。今はといえば、人事部長が来田さんに日本人の夫を見つけるようにと言った会社でさえ、社長は女性です。

    来田さんにとって最後の挑戦は自分自身でした。来田さんは最初、医療機器の会社でマーケティングの仕事をしていましたが、何度昇進しても先がないと感じました。それで仕事をやめ、学校に戻ってMBAを取得し、日本語ももっと勉強しました。その間ずっと友人のトレーニング会社でパートとして働きました。しかしその後はイケアで働き始め、歳月を経て今の役職に昇りつめました。イケアは女性にとって働きやすい会社です。「女性の管理職が多いんです--およそ5割です! それにうちの企業文化は女性に好意的で、多くの面で貢献でき、成長させてくれます」。

    結局、「自分に合った仕事や職場を見つけるのは、どこの国でもひとつの芸もしくは洗練された技能です」と来田さんは言います。来田さんはその芸をマスターしたようです。心の中で来田さんはここでの生活をとても気に入っていて、ありがたいと思っています。

    イケア

    文:グレゴリー・フリン

    Read More
  • おとぎ話に感化され、アカデミックな研究を

    [From April Issue 2012]

    Yannis PANAYOTOPOULOS

    Yannis PANAYOTOPOULOS, a post-doctoral fellow of Geophysics at Tokyo University, first fell in love with Japan watching television programs in his native Greece. One of them was the American show “Shogun.” The most important one, though, was “Manga Nippon Mukashi Banashi” (Cartoon Once Upon a Time in Japan), an animated series of traditional Japanese fairy stories. “I remember watching this classic manga when I was a kid, and was always fascinated with the Japanese culture and values portrayed in the series,” says Panayotopoulos.

    Though Panayotopoulos wanted to start learning Japanese straightaway, a language teacher suggested he wait until he had finished high school and could handle the English in the textbooks. “Once I finished high school, true to my dream, I asked my parents again if I could now finally start learning Japanese. Less than a week after that, I was sitting in a classroom at the Japanese-Greek Friendship Institution getting myself introduced to Mrs. SUZUKI, my Japanese teacher for the next six years.”

    Those lessons paid off: In 2002, after finishing a degree in geology in Greece, Panayotopoulos made his way to Tokyo University on a Japanese Ministry of Education scholarship where he earned a masters degree and PhD in geophysics. Because there is so much seismic activity, for a geophysicist, Panayotopoulos says, “Japan is the place to be!”

    While Panayotopoulos uses Japanese 99% of the time, it wasn’t always easy. “Although I knew some Japanese when I arrived, attending lectures at the university was a whole different game. In the beginning, I had hard time understanding the scientific terms used in the lectures.” But these days, he says, he can give lectures in Japanese himself.

    Some of this growth is thanks to the people in Panayotopoulos’ life. “When I first arrived, my best friend that I met back then – and the guy that gave the welcoming speech to my wedding – was a Japanese guy. I remember taking turns sleeping at each other’s houses when we were both university students. His mother just loved me!” Moreover, Panayotopoulos says, “My colleagues and supervising professors have been extremely supportive for all my years in Japan.”

    A strong advocate of cross-cultural communication, in his free time he runs Japan’s International Gamers Guild Tokyo. “We have lots of Japanese members joining us not just to play games, but also to make foreign friends. You can hardly say that everyone in the club is fluent in both Japanese and English, but people willing to communicate always find a way to do so and have fun on the way!”

    He says he’s never experienced the same language barrier that other expats seem to come up against. “I tend to think that people that have problems communicating in Japan are probably bad communicators to begin with,” he says. “These people are not willing to embrace a different culture. Which makes me wonder why they bother leaving their country in the first place.”

    Ultimately, Panayotopoulos’ Japanese wife probably explains his Japanese growth the most. “I always joke with her that after I met her, I wanted to study Japanese harder so that I could fully understand what she said, but now that I can, I wish I never had. She complains that when she first met me, my Japanese was cute because it was really polite. Now she says I sound like a Japanese oyaji.”

    Japan’s International Gamers Guild Tokyo

    Text: Gregory FLYNN

    [2012年4月号掲載記事]

    ヤニス・パナヨトプロスさん

    東京大学地球物理学特任研究員のヤニス・パナヨトプロスさんが最初に日本に魅かれたのは、母国ギリシャでテレビ番組を見ていたときでした。その番組の一つはアメリカのドラマ「将軍」でした。しかし最も重要だったのは、日本の伝統的なおとぎ話をアニメ化したシリーズ「まんが日本昔ばなし」だったのです。「子どもの頃、あの古典のまんがを見ながら、シリーズの中で描写されている日本の文化と価値観に夢中になったのを覚えています」とパナヨトプロスさんは話します。

    パナヨトプロスさんは、すぐにでも日本語の勉強を始めたかったのですが、教科書の英語が理解できるよう高校卒業まで待つことを語学の先生に勧められました。「高校を終えたとき、夢見ていた通り、日本語の勉強を始めていいかと改めて両親に聞いたのです。それから1週間もたたないうちに日希(日本-ギリシャ)友好会館の教室に座って、その後6年間私の日本語の先生となる鈴木さんを紹介されました」。

    そのレッスンは役に立ちました。2002年、パナヨトプロスさんはギリシャで地学の学位を取った後、文部科学省の奨学金で東京大学へ来て地球物理化学の修士号および博士号を取得しました。地震活動がとても活発なので、地球物理学者にとって「日本は、私たちがいなくてはならない場所!」とパナヨトプロスさんは言います。

    パナヨトプロスさんは99%の時間は日本語を話していますが、平坦な道ばかりではありませんでした。「来たとき、日本語は多少知っていましたが、大学の講議を受けるのとは全く別の話でした。最初は講議で使われる特定の用語が理解できませんでした」。でも今では彼自身、日本語で講議ができると言います。

    この進歩はパナヨトプロスさんのまわりの人々のおかげです。「最初に来た頃出会った最良の友人--私の結婚式で歓迎スピーチをしてくれた人--は日本人でした。二人とも学生だったとき、互いの家でかわるがわる寝泊りしたのを覚えています。彼のお母さんにすごく気に入られたんですよ!」そればかりか「日本に来てからずっと同僚も指導教官も本当に良くしてくれたんです」とパナヨトプロスさんは話します。

    文化交流の熱心な支持者であるパナヨトプロスさんは、時間があるときには日本国際ゲーマーズギルド東京を運営しています。「ゲームをするためだけでなく、外国人の友人をつくるために参加する日本人の会員もたくさんいます。日本語も英語も両方流ちょうな人ばかりとはいえませんが、意思疎通する気がある人は必ずその方法を見つけますし、その過程を楽しんでいるのです」。

    パナヨトプロスさんは、他の外国人居住者がぶつかるといわれる言葉の壁は経験したことがないと言います。「日本でコミュニケーションの問題がある人は、おそらく最初からコミュニケーションが苦手な人じゃないかと思います。そういう人は異なる文化を受け入れる気がないのです。なぜわざわざ自分の国から出てくるのか不思議です」。

    パナヨトプロスさんの日本語の進歩を一番よく説明できるのは、結局日本人の奥さんだろう。「彼女に出会ってから彼女の言うことが十分わかるようもっと日本語を勉強したかったのです。今は何もかもわかってしまって、勉強しなきゃよかったと彼女に冗談を言うんです。最初に会ったとき、私の日本語は本当にていねいでかわいかったと彼女は文句を言うんですよ。今は日本人のオヤジみたいな話し方だって」。

    日本国際ゲーマーズギルド東京

    文:グレゴリー・フリン

    Read More
  • 趣味が夢の仕事にトランスフォーム

    [From March Issue 2012]

    Andrew HALL

    Before landing a job as a content planner for a design company in the toy industry, American Andrew HALL worked as a gourmet reporter on TV Asahi’s evening news show, as a columnist writing about stock trading, and as a translator of the “Yakuza” video game series. “I can only assume it was my language skills that landed me these jobs, because I’m sure no expert on gourmet cuisine, stock trading, or yakuza,” he says.

    Hall is, however, no amateur when it comes to toys. “I had always wanted to work in the toy industry,” he says. “I was born in ‘81, which means that I was the right age to experience some of the most memorable American cartoons of the 80’s, with ‘The Transformers’ being at the forefront. Little did I know that many of them originated from Japanese animation studios or toys… I was stunned to find that many of the ideas that had captivated me so greatly as a child had all come from the same distant country.”

    Right after graduating with a B.A. in Japanese he moved to Tokyo. “I envisioned that becoming fluent in Japanese would allow me to become a translator, letting me work closely with the various media I enjoyed so much.” Still, it would be some time before Hall landed his current job. “I had gained lots of interesting language experience, but didn’t seem much closer to working in my dream industry. You can’t exactly just go knocking on someone’s door, I thought.”

    His determination to acquire the language made for a steep learning curve: “The important thing is to aggressively learn and adapt through this. Make an error once, it’s understandable. Make the same error again, and that’s on you.” Hall applies this approach to all aspects of his life and feels that it’s helped him get to where he is today.

    “During my years of study in college, I remember feeling challenged by upper level courses where there tended to be more focus on public speaking than on kanji comprehension and writing,” he explains. “Motivation filled in those gaps, as I had my own intense interests.” Hall doesn’t measure success in terms of academic qualifications, but instead puts more emphasis on practical ability. “You can have a black belt in the dojo, but if you don’t know how to use your skills, suddenly when things get rough, it’s not going to count for much.”

    Hall now translates and plans content for Part One Co., Ltd., a design company that does work for some of the largest toy companies in Japan. He landed the job by contacting the president of the company directly, an approach which initially landed him a small translation job. At Part One’s online shop e-HOBBY, his work now includes creating proposals for new Transformers exclusives, doing research for manufacturers and developing new international projects.

    Hall finds working in Japan enjoyable. “Something I’ve always respected about Japan is the culture of craftsmanship present in work. The concept of adhering to great quality and design despite the pressure of cost-performance. I love being a part of that.”

    Overall, this kind of passion is central to Hall’s success. He explains, “What I learned getting where I am now is that an MBA is not a necessary qualification to being hired in most Japanese industries. It turns out that the most important qualifications are great Japanese ability and more guts than ‘Grimlock.’”

    Part One Co., Ltd.

    Text: Gregory FLYNN

    [2012年3月号掲載記事]

    アンドリュー・ホールさん

    玩具などの企画デザインを行っている企業にコンテンツ企画者として就職する前、アメリカ人のアンドリュー・ホールさんの仕事は、テレビ朝日の夕方の報道番組でのグルメリポーター、株取引についてのコラムニスト、「龍が如く」というテレビゲームシリーズの翻訳者でした。ホールさんは「そういう仕事に就けたのは語学力のおかげだったとしか思えません。私は当然グルメ料理や株取引、やくざについての専門家じゃないですからね」と話します。

    とはいっても、ホールさんは玩具に関しては素人ではありません。「玩具業界で働きたいとずっと思っていました」と言います。「生まれたのが1981年で、つまり80年代アメリカの最も記憶に残るアニメ、特に『トランスフォーマー』を経験するのにちょうどいい年齢だったのです。それらの多くが日本のアニメスタジオや玩具が起源だったとは知りませんでした。自分が子どもの頃夢中になったアイディアの多くがみんな遠くの同じ国から来ていると知って仰天しました」。

    日本語の学士号を取った後、ホールさんはすぐに東京へ引っ越しました。「日本語が流ちょうになれば翻訳者になれて、自分を楽しませてくれたいろんなメディアと緊密に仕事ができるだろうと思ったのです」。とはいえ、ホールさんが今の仕事に就くまでには多少時間がかかりました。「おもしろい日本語の経験はたくさんしても、夢みた業界での仕事に近づいているような気はしませんでした。いきなり門をたたく訳にはいかないと思いました」。

    日本語をマスターするという決意のためにホールさんは苦労しました。「大事なことは積極的に学びつつ適応することです。一度の間違いはやむを得ません。同じ間違いを再びすれば、それは自分のせいです」。ホールさんはこのアプローチを自分の人生のあらゆる面に適用していて、それが今の仕事に就くのに役立ったと感じています。

    「大学で勉強していたとき、漢字の読解と筆記より人前で話すことに重点を置く傾向の強い上級コースは難しいと感じたのを覚えています」とホールさんは説明します。「すごく興味を持っていることがあったので、個人的な動機でそのギャップを埋められました」。ホールさんは学歴で成功をはかるのではなく、もっと実践的な能力を重視しています。「道場では黒帯でも自分の技の使い方を知らなければ、突然厳しい状況になったとき、黒帯は何の価値もありません」。

    ホールさんは今、日本の大手玩具企業のデザインを請け負う株式会社ぱあとわんで、コンテンツの翻訳や企画をしています。社長に直接コンタクトすることで職を得ましたが、最初にもらったのは小さな翻訳の仕事でした。今の仕事には、ぱあとわんのオンラインショップe-HOBBYの担当としてトランスフォーマーの新製品の提案、メーカー向け調査、新たな国際プロジェクトの開発が含まれています。

    ホールさんは日本で働くのは楽しいと思っています。「日本に関して私が常に敬意を抱いていたのは、職場に職人技の文化があることです。コストのプレッシャーがあっても良い品質とデザインにこだわること。それに参加できるのが嬉しいです」。

    総合的にみて、ホールさんが成功したのはこのような情熱のたまものです。「ここに至るまでに学んだことは、MBAは必ずしも雇われるのに必要な資格ではないということです。日本の大半の業界で一番重要なのは高い日本語能力と『グリムロック』以上の根性です」とホールさんは説明します。

    株式会社ぱあとわん

    文:グレゴリー・フリン

    Read More
  • 日本語に突撃

    [From February Issue 2012]

    Daniel ROBSON

    Japan can be intimidating for newcomers, but plenty of people who arrive with little or no language skill under their belt can still find success. “I came to Japan armed with a teeny, tiny amount of spoken Japanese,” says Daniel ROBSON of his arrival here in 2006.

    That little Japanese was “mostly learned from Japanese punk and pop songs or from this awful home study CD that taught me how to speak perfect Japanese circa 1930. Whenever I spoke Japanese learned from that CD set, people laughed.”

    Now, his work relies on interactions in Japanese. “I work as an editor at The Japan Times and a freelance writer for publications around the world. I also run a tour agency, ‘It Came From Japan,’ which takes Japanese bands to tour abroad, and I put on a monthly live show in Tokyo called ‘Bad Noise.’”

    He explains, “As a freelance writer, I use Japanese to line up assignments, interview bands or videogame creators, and so on – I write about music, games, city guides and Japanese culture in general, so of course I need to understand what the hell is going on around me in order to write about it.” And moreover, “As for booking bands for live shows and organizing tours, I couldn’t do a good job at any of that without being able to contact bands, create promotional material, chat with customers and so on.”

    So how did Robson do it? “I really wanted to become fluent, but as an overworked freelancer I never had much time to study.” At first, “I mostly learned by osmosis, drinking in the sort of bars where no one knew any English and I would be forced to speak Japanese.” It was slow going, “but I picked things up slowly but surely, and eventually got a teacher for one-on-one lessons, which I kept up for a year and a half.”

    He also met his future Japanese wife, who spoke little English, the bonus was that it, “helped in terms of practice!” He recalls, “I guess the biggest challenges at first were things like phone calls to sort out a bill or some other problem, and of course kanji.” But persistence is key: “Bit by bit it all sticks.”

    “It’s inevitable that one has to adjust to the customs and culture of another country.” Yet there are still situations when Robson says, “You want to smash your head repeatedly against a wall … Like when someone says ‘it’s difficult’ when what they really mean is ‘no.’ You have to learn to read those situations.”

    And I still struggle with kanji, whether it’s penetrating a short email or enduring 50 hours of Final Fantasy XIII for a review.” But as he says, “There are other difficulties, sure, but no one ever got anywhere by focusing on the negatives!”

    Being married to a Japanese, “We speak Japanese at home 99% of the time, and these days I even understand my in-laws slightly old-fashioned vocabulary.” Besides, he loves living here. As he says, “Tokyo is 300 times better than London in almost every way, and I love it here.”

    Bad Noise

    Text: Gregory FLYNN

    [2012年2月号掲載記事]

    ダニエル・ロブソンさん

    初めて日本に来る人は、日本におじけづくかもしれません。しかし日本語をほとんど、あるいは全く学ばずにやって来る多くの人たちにも、成功するチャンスはあります。ダニエル・ロブソンさんは「ほとんど日本語を話せない状態で日本に来ました」と、来日した2006年頃について語ります。

    その少ししかなかった日本語力は、「ほとんどが日本のパンクロックやポップス、または1930年代頃の独学用のひどい日本語教材CDから学んだものでした。そのCDで学んだ日本語を話すたびに、みんなから笑われました」。

    今では、彼の仕事は日本語でやりとりします。「私はジャパンタイムズで編集の仕事と、世界の出版物のフリーライターをしています。バンドツアーの手配会社『It Came From Japan』も経営しています。これは日本発信の仕事で、日本のバンドを海外ツアーに連れていきます。『BAD NOISE!』というライブも東京で毎月行っています」。

    ロブソンさんは説明します。「フリーライターとしてバンドやTVゲームクリエイターへのインタビューや契約などをするために、日本語を使います。たいてい音楽、ゲーム、シティーガイド、それに日本文化について書くので、当然、身の周りで何が起きているかを理解する必要があります」。さらに、「ライブのバンド予約やツアーの企画には、バンドに連絡を取ったりプロモーション素材を作ったり、顧客と話したりしなければ、いい仕事はできません」。

    それでは、ロブソンさんはどうやったのだろうか? 「流暢になりたいと本気で思いましたが、働きすぎのフリーランスには勉強する時間があまりありませんでした」。最初は「主に英語を知らない人しかいなくて、自分から日本語を話すしかないバーのようなところで飲んで、少しずつ学びました」。それには時間がかかりました。「でもゆっくりですが確実に理解し、やがてマンツーマンでレッスンしてくれる先生を見つけて1年半続けました」。

    後々妻となる日本人女性にも出会いますが、彼女は最初ほとんど英語が話せませんでした。そのことで、「がんばって強制的に日本語を使うようになったことが本当に役立ちました」と当時を振り返ります。「最初に一番大変だったことは、いろんな請求書に関する電話などでした。そしてもちろん、漢字でした」。でも継続は力なり。「少しずつですがやがてその全てが身につくんです」。

    「他の国の習慣や文化に合わせる必要があることは避けられません」。けれどもロブソンさんはいまだに理解に苦しむ状況があると言います。「本当は『ノー』という意味なのに、『それは難しい』と遠回しに言われたときなどには、何度も頭を壁に打ちつけたくなります。そういう状況を読む学習をしなければなりません」。

    「それに私は短いメールでも、おさらいのためにやる50時間にわたるファイナルファンタジー13でも、まだ漢字に苦労しています」。しかしロブソンさんは言います。「他にも難しいことはありますが、否定的なことばかり考えても、何も達成できません」。

    日本人と結婚したので、ロブソンさんは「私の家では99%日本語で話します。そして最近は、義父母の少し古い言葉さえもわかります」。他にも、彼はここで生活することがとても好きです。彼は言います。「あらゆる面でロンドンより東京の方が300倍いいです。ここが大好きです」。

    Bad Noise

    文:グレゴリー・フリン

    Read More
  • ビジネス文化は思いもかけないことがある

    [From January Issue 2012]

    Alessandro ALLEGRANZI

    Although Alessandro ALLEGRANZI, holds dual American and Italian citizenship, Japan has fascinated him ever since reading the samurai novel Musashi in junior high school. “It was great fun, and really opened my mind to a completely different culture and world,” he says.

    “I’ve had an interest in Japan since that time, but unfortunately didn’t get to study the language until college, when I attended Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenessee, USA. I studied the language for four years.”

    The big change for his Japanese came, however, during his semester abroad at Rikkyo University in Tokyo. “I remember for the first few weeks people kept giggling at my Japanese, and when I asked why, they said it was because I spoke like an old woman. Thankfully, after a few yakuza and samurai period movies, the problem solved itself.” He goes on, “I learned more during those four months in Japan than during the four years in the US combined.”

    He now works for a freight forwarding (shipping services) company in Tokyo. “I focus on the USA-Japan lane, and sell the company’s services, organize rates and customer support, etc.” More specifically, “On a typical day, I actually spend most of the time outside the office, making sales calls, visiting clients and prospects. I usually get back to the office around four or five, and stay there until seven or eight glued to the computer doing correspondence and clerical stuff.”

    “I am the only foreigner in the office. The vast majority of my sales calls are in Japanese.” He continues, “Business Japanese is a totally different beast. Just in terms of vocabulary I felt like I had to learn a whole new language. ‘Bonded warehouse,’ ‘customs inspection,’ etc., were all terms I had to learn from scratch. Additionally, in school I had learned keigo (formal Japanese) towards the end of my studies as a sort of afterthought.”

    The culture also presented some surprises. For example, “One of the guys who works under me in exports leaves every day at 6pm sharp.” As a result, everyone criticizes the man: “He is lazy; he doesn’t care about the job, the list goes on.” Yet, according to Allegranzi, this is the most efficient man in the office. “To me, as an American, the whole phenomenon is ridiculous. However, in Japan, in a lot of cases, how long you work equals how well you work.”

    According to Allegranzi, this is because, “In Japan, generally the company is the focus, and the individual is a cog in the machine.” But actually, he has come to appreciate one effect of this. “The sense of unity and togetherness also has its positive side. It takes a while to break in and be accepted, but once you’re part of the group, you’re in.”

    Text: Gregory FLYNN

    [2012年1月号掲載記事]

    アレッサンドロ・アレグランジさん

    アレッサンドロ・アレグランジさんはアメリカとイタリアの市民権を持っていますが、中学校で時代小説「武蔵」を読んで以来、日本に魅せられてきました。「とても面白くて、違った文化や世界に心を開かせてくれました」と言います。

    「その時以来、日本に関心を持ってきましたが、残念ながら、アメリカ・テネシー州ナッシュビルのヴァンダービルト大学に進むまでは日本語を勉強しませんでした。大学では4年間、日本語を勉強しました」。

    しかし、彼の日本語に大きな変化をもたらしたのは、東京の立教大学に1学期の間、留学をしたときでした。「最初の数週間、みんなが私の日本語をずっとくすくす笑っていたことを覚えています。理由を聞いたら、おばあさんのような話し方だからと言われました。ありがたいことに、ヤクザ映画と時代劇映画を何本か見たら、その問題は自然に解決しました」。そして、こう続けます。「日本でのこの4ヵ月の方が、アメリカでの4年間よりもっと多くのことを学びました」。

    彼は今、東京で、外国の運送(船便)会社で働いています。「アメリカ-日本航路を集中的に扱っています。営業、料金作成、カスタマー・サポートなどをしています」。厳密に言えば「ほとんどをオフィスの外で過ごし、営業の電話をして、クライアントやクライアント候補を訪問するのが日課です。いつも4時か5時にオフィスに戻り、7時か8時までオフィスに残ってコンピューターで文書のやり取りや事務仕事をします」。

    「私はオフィスで唯一の外国人です。営業の電話のほとんどは日本語です」。さらに続けて、「ビジネスの日本語は全く違ったものです。ボキャブラリーに関して言えば、まるっきり新しい言語を学ばなければならないような気分でした。「保税倉庫」「税関検閲」などは全てゼロから学ばなければならなかった言葉です。その上、学校では敬語(あらたまった言い方)を、日本語の勉強が終わる頃に、付け足しのように学んだだけでした」。

    文化的にも、驚いたことがありました。たとえば、「輸出部門で私の下で働いていた一人の男性が、毎日6時きっかりに退社するんです」。その結果、みんながその人を、「彼はなまけ者だ、仕事を大事にしていない、などきりがありません」と非難します。しかし、アレグランジさんによると、彼はオフィスで最も有能な社員です。「アメリカ人の私にしてみれば、この現象の全てがばかげています。しかし日本では多くの場合、どれだけ長い時間働くかが、イコールどれだけよく仕事をしているかということになるのです」。

    アレグランジさんによれば、「日本では一般的に会社が中心で、個人は機械の歯車なんです」となります。しかし実際には、彼はこの効果の一つを高く評価するようになりました。「でも一致団結してまとまる感覚には肯定的な面もあります。仲間に入って受け入れられるには少し時間がかかりますが、一旦グループに入ってしまえばずっと受け入れられるのです」。

    文:グレゴリー・フリン

    Read More
  • 日本人との会話

    [From December Issue 2010]

    When you have the opportunity to speak with a Japanese person, you will usually be asked where you are originally from. You can reply in English as Japanese people generally understand the pronunciation of foreign country names. However, there are some countries whose names in Japanese are different from their English ones, such as Chuugoku for China, Kankoku for Korea, and Igirisu for Britain. Other country names also expressed a bit differently, include Suisu for Switzerland, Oranda for the Netherlands and Amerika for the USA.

    You will most likely also be asked what it is that you do. And while westerners generally answer with their job title, such as “engineer” or “sales clerk,” most Japanese simply say “company staff,” unless they are professionals, such as a “doctor” or “lawyer.” Those who work at leading companies may also inform you of their company’s name.

    You may also discuss your family. In doing so, you should clearly distinguish between your brothers (kyoudai) and sisters (shimai), older or younger. When Japanese refer to them, generally they say “ani” for an elder brother and “otouto” for a younger one, or “ane” for an elder sister and “imouto” for a younger one. “Kyoudai” means also “siblings,” but it is written in hiragana when it refers to “siblings.”

    The English words “boyfriend” and “girlfriend” are also usually well understood. However, in the case of a steady boy/girlfriend, while using the term “koibito” in conversation is a little bit old fashioned, nowadays, “kareshi” or “kare” for a boyfriend and “kanojo” for a girlfriend are more common. “Kare” also means “he” while “kanojo” means “she.”

    Expressions describing a person’s appearance may also be used in conversation. A beautiful woman is “bijin” while an ugly woman is “busu,” which, in Japan, is considered an extremely rude word, so don’t use it. A handsome man is “ikemen.” But the word “hansamu,” adopted from English, is also commonly used.

    “Shumi” (hobbies) are also good conversation topics. Those who are obsessed with anime and manga are called “otaku,” and have been regarded as being hesitant to communicate with people, preferring to escape into virtual worlds, with Akihabara, Tokyo as their headquarters. But nowadays, they are no longer considered odd, while Akihabara has become a well-known tourist attraction.

    [2010年12月号掲載記事]

    日本人と話す機会があると、まずは、どこから来たのかを聞かれるでしょう。英語で国名を言えば、たいていの日本人は理解できるので、英語で答えてもだいじょうぶです。しかし、イギリス(Britain)、中国(China)、韓国(Korea)のように日本語名と英語名とが異なる国もあります。スイス(Switzerland)、タイ(Thailand)、オランダ(Holland/Netherland)、アメリカ(USA)のように、多少異なる表現となる国もあります。

    仕事は何をしているかもおそらく聞かれるでしょう。欧米人は、「技術者」や「店員」など、一般的に職種で答えます。しかし、日本人の場合、「医者」「弁護士」などのように専門職でない場合には、「会社員」と答える人が多いです。大きな会社に勤めているなら、会社名も言うかもしれません。

    家族のことを話すこともあるでしょう。注意すべきことは、 兄弟、姉妹が、あなたの年上なのか年下なのをはっきり言うことです。日本人は一般的に、兄と弟、また姉と妹を区別して言います。「きょうだい」は「シブリング」(兄弟、姉妹を含めた意味)としても使われますが、「シブリング」を意味するときにはひらがなで書きます。

    「ボーイフレンド」「ガールフレンド」は、英語で通じます。恋人の場合、会話の中では、「恋人」はやや古い言い方で、最近は「彼氏」「彼」、「彼女」が一般的に使われています。「彼」は「he」、「彼女」は「she」の意味もあります。

    容姿などを表現する言葉も会話で使われるでしょう。美しい女性のことを「美人」と言います。醜い女性のことは「ブス」と言いますが、非常に失礼な言い方なので使わないでください。ハンサムな男性は「イケメン」と言います。また、英語の「ハンサム」も一般的に使われています。

    趣味は会話のいいネタとなるでしょう。アニメやマンガなどにのめり込んでいる人は「オタク」と呼ばれ、人付き合いが苦手な仮想世界に逃げる人たちとみなされ、秋葉原(東京)が彼らの本拠地でした。しかし、最近は特別視されなくなり、秋葉原は今や有名な観光地となりました。

    Read More
  • 日本の地図と地名の意味

    [From November Issue 2010]

    Do you know that the kanji “日本” and “日” (ni / nichi / hi) means “day” and/or “sunshine”? Do you also know that “本” (hon / moto) means “book,” but also “origin,” and/or “home”? In brief, together “日本” means “the origin of sunshine.” This is why Japan is often referred to, in English, as “the land of the rising Sun.”

    On a map you can see that Japan is mainly made up of four big islands, the largest one being “本州”/Honshu(u). “州”/shu(u) usually means “state,” but on some occasions it may also mean country. “本州”/Honshu(u) means “home state,” and can generally be translated as “mainland.”

    The smallest of the four islands is “四国”/Shikoku. Previously it was made up of four independent States (countries), which have now become four distinct prefectures. Originally in the southern islands of “九州”/Kyushu(u) there were nine States. Now, they have become a group of seven prefectures. The northernmost island is “北海道”/Hokkaido(u) which literally means “North Sea Road.” The kanji “道”/do(u) road is said to have been used because there were already main arteries such as “Tokaido(u)” and “Tohokudo(u)” in the area.

    Japan is divided into eight regions; Hokkaido(u), Shikoku and Kyushu(u) form one region, while Honshu(u) is subdivided into 5 regions that include Tohoku, Kanto(u), Chu(u)bu, Kinki and Chu(u)goku. The kanji “東北”/To(u)hoku exactly fits the English word “northeast.” Kanto(u) is considered to be the center of Japan’s economy and culture and also where To(u)kyo(u), Japan’s present capital, is located. Chu(u)bu is physically located in the middle of the country, while the Kinki region is commonly referred to as “Kansai.” Chu(u)goku is often confused with the neighboring country of China as it is also written and pronunced “中国”/Chu(u)goku, and is therefore often referred as the Chu(u)goku region.

    In Japan’s 8 regions there are 47 ken/prefectures, but in To(u)kyo, O(o)saka, Kyo(u)to and Hokkaido(u), the word “ken” is replaced with other names. Instead, they are called To(u)kyo(u)-to, O(o)saka-fu, Kyo(u)to-fu and Hokkaido(u). Since “do(u)” is already part of its name, no additional ending is required. This is somewhat similar to the capital of the U.S.A., Washington, which is commonly referred to as Washington D.C.

    The region’s largest cities are (from north to south): Sapporo, Sendai, To(u)kyo(u), Yokohama, Nagoya, Kyo(u)to, O(o)saka, Ko(u)be, Hiroshima and Fukuoka. Central To(u)kyo(u), where many non-Japanese live and work, is divided into 23 wards.

    Kyo(u)to had been the capital of Japan for more than 1,000 years. “都” (to / miyako) means “capital,” so Kyoto means the “Capital of Kyo(u).” “東京”/To(u)kyo(u), is located to the east “東” (tou / higashi) of “京” /Kyo(u), and therefore means, “To(u)kyo(u),” the capital east of Kyo(u). Located within To(u)kyo(u), a big town “新宿” /Shinjuku means “new inn.” “新” (shin / atarashii) means “new” and “宿” (juku / yado) means “inn.” This name was derived from the new inns that were being built in that area. Thus, each place has its own name-history.

    [2010年11月号掲載記事]

    「日本」の漢字の意味をご存じでしょうか。「日」は「デー」「サンシャイニング」の意味です。「本」は「ブック」ですが、そのほか、「オリジン」「ホーム」の意味もあります。つまり、「日本」は「日の元」を意味します。英語で、「日が昇る国」と呼ばれることがあるのはそのためです。

    地図を広げると、日本が主に大きな四つの島で構成されていることがわかるでしょう。一番大きな島は、「本州」です。「州」は「ステート」ですが、「国」と同じように考えてよいでしょう。「本州」は「ホームステート」。一般的には、「メインランド」と訳されています。

    一番小さな島は、「四国」です。かつて独立した一つの州(国)が四つありました。現在は四つの県があります。南の島「九州」には、以前は九つの州がありました。現在は、7つの県になっています。一番北の島は「北海道」です。直訳すると、北の海の道です。日本の各地方にあった幹線、「東海道」「東北道」などになぞらえ、つけられたといいます。

    日本は、8つのブロックに分かれています。北海道、四国、九州はそれぞれ一つのブロックですが、本州は、さらに東北、関東、中部、近畿、中国の5つに分かれます。東北の漢字は英語の「東北」と同じです。関東は日本の経済文化の中心で、現在の日本の首都、東京があります。中部は日本の真ん中に位置しています。近畿は、通常、関西と呼ばれています。中国は、文字も発音も同じ隣の国の中国と混同されるので、中国地方と呼ばれることが多いです。

    8つのブロックの中に、合計で47の県があります。東京、大阪、京都、それに北海道を加えた四つは県の代わりに他の名前を使います。それぞれ、東京都、大阪府、京都府。北海道はすでに「道」がつけられているので、何もつけずそのままです。これは、アメリカの首都、ワシントンがワシントンDCと呼ばれるのに似ています。

    各ブロックの大都市は、北から、札幌、仙台、東京、横浜、名古屋、京都、大阪、神戸、広島、福岡といったところです。外国人が多く暮らす東京の中心は、23の区に分かれています。

    京都は1,000年以上も日本の中心でした。「都」は「キャピタル」という意味です。つまり「京の都」ということです。東京は、京の東に位置していることから「東京」(京の東に位置する都)と名づけられました。東京の大きな街の新宿は、「新しい宿」という意味です。「新」は「新しい」、「宿」は「泊まる場所」のことです。現在の場所に宿場が新しくつけられたことに由来します。このように、地名にはそれぞれに由来があります。

    Read More