• Local Heroes Born From Love of Home Towns

    [From April Issue 2015]

    Heroic characters that come to the aid of the weak and slay evil are well-liked in Japan. Many Japanese grow up watching TV programs about such heroes. Each region has its local mascot and the number of heroic characters, too, is increasing. These are called local heroes.
    Local mascots are created to promote local produce or to revitalize their region. However, most local heroes come into being because of the locals’ affection for their region or from their longing for a heroic character. It’s said that as many as 700 heroic characters exist in Japan. They are popular not only with children, but also with grownups.
    On Tanegashima Island in Kagoshima Prefecture, “Rito Shentai Tanegashiman” is popular. This team of heroes were created 17 years ago by a local youth club. Speaking the local dialect, rather than fighting like heroes, their role is to inspire the people of Tanegashima. The Tanegashiman team is already renowned not only in Kagoshima but in other prefectures. “I’d like everyone in the country to know about Tanegashima and Tanegashiman,” says KUKIHARA Kiyotaka of the PR department of Tanegashima Action Club.
    Tanegashiman get a lot of requests to appear at long-distance relay races and, being well-received by the elderly, at local class reunions for 60-year-olds. To the surprise of the youth club’s members, their villainous enemies, the Jabatche, have also become popular. The Jabatche speak the Tanegashima dialect and make people laugh with jokes about audience members. Their amusing banter with the audience is the talk of the town.

    201504-1-2

    Chojin Neiger

    The local hero of Akita Prefecture, too, is also massively popular. Super God Neiger was inspired by the well-known cry of Akita’s local deity Namahage “Warui ko wa ‘ineiger’/inai ka.” (Are there any naughty children here?) His true identity is AKITA Ken., a young man from an ordinary family of farmers. He protects the peace from baddies. When he transforms into Neiger his rallying cry is “Super God Neiger, protector of the sea, the mountains and Akita!”
    EBINA Tamotsu, who was instrumental in the creation of Super God Neiger, has loved heroic characters since his childhood. He believes Neiger’s popularity is in the way that the hero embraces the Akita world. A TV program about Neiger was broadcast not only in Akita, but also in Tokyo. “Nothing makes me happier than hearing children cheering,” says Ebina.
    Local heroes might utilize regional products as weapons or have a signature pose. TAKAMOTO Shintaro is a fan of local heroes and even travels to distant locations for meet-and-greet events and shows. “I find it particularly interesting that they speak in dialects. It’s also fun to compare regional idiosyncrasies,” he says.
    Most heroes fight their enemies in order to keep the peace and protect the environment in their regions. They therefore set a good example to children. Some adults are nostalgic for the heroes they once looked up to. Local heroes will continue to serve locals’ affection for their region.

    Text: TSUCHIYA Emi[2015年4月号掲載記事]

    弱い人を助け、悪を退治するヒーローキャラクターが日本で人気です。多くの日本人がそんなヒーローのテレビ番組を見て育ちました。各地にはご当地キャラクターがいますが、ヒーローのキャラクターも増えています。彼らはご当地ヒーローと呼ばれています。
    ご当地キャラはその地方の名産品の宣伝や、地域を活性化する目的でつくられます。一方、ご当地ヒーローは地元の人のふるさとへの愛情や、ヒーローへの憧れから生まれることが多いです。今では日本全国に700ものヒーローキャラクターが存在するといわれています。子どもだけでなく大人にも人気があります。
    鹿児島県の種子島では、「離島閃隊タネガシマン」が人気です。17年前に地元の青年団が考え出しました。種子島の方言を話し、戦うヒーローというよりも種子島に閃きを与える役割を担っています。今では鹿児島だけでなく他の県でも知られるようになりました。「全国の人に種子島とタネガシマンについて知ってほしいです」と種子島アクションクラブ広報部の久木原清貴さんは話します。
    駅伝大会や地元の還暦同窓会などへの出演依頼が多く、お年寄りにも歓迎されています。青年団の人たちにとって意外だったのは、タネガシマンだけでなくジャバッチェという悪役にも人気が出たことです。ジャバッチェは種子島の方言を話し、お客さんをネタにして笑いをとります。そのやりとりが面白いと評判になりました。

    秋田県にも大人気のご当地ヒーローがいます。有名な秋田の神様、なまはげの叫び声「悪い子はいねが(悪い子はいないか)」にちなんだ「超神ネイガー」です。その実体はごく普通の農家の青年、アキタ・ケンです。彼は悪者から平和を守ります。変身のときの決め台詞は「海を、山を、秋田を守る、超神ネイガー!」です。
    超神ネイガーの生みの親、海老名保さんは子どもの頃からヒーローキャラクターが大好きでした。ヒーローものに秋田の世界を取り入れたことが人気の理由と考えています。テレビ番組は秋田だけでなく東京でも放送されました。「子どもたちの声援が何よりもうれしいです」と海老名さんは言います。
    ご当地ヒーローはその地域の特産物を武器にしたり決めのポーズに取り入れたりしています。ご当地ヒーローファンの高本新太郎さんは握手会やショーのため遠方にも足を運びます。「方言でしゃべるところが特におもしろいです。地域の個性が出ているので比較する楽しみもあります」と言います。
    多くのヒーローは地域の安全や自然保護のために敵と戦います。そのため、子どもたちにとってよいお手本となっています。また、大人の中には昔憧れたヒーローを懐かしく思い出す人も多いのです。これからもご当地ヒーローは地元の人の郷土愛に貢献していくでしょう。

    文:土屋えみ

    Read More
  • In Oman it’s also Customary to Remove Shoes in the Home

    [From April Issue 2015]
    [2015年4月号掲載記事]

    After sustaining damage in the Great East Japan Earthquake and going through the disaster of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, in March 2011 a manufacturer in Fukushima Prefecture received an order worth 2.6 billion yen for water purifiers. The order came with a message: “You can use the water purifiers in areas affected by the disaster before delivery.” “It was the least support our country could offer to our friends in Japan,” says Abeer A. AISHA, wife of the Ambassador of Oman, modestly.
    Mrs. Aisha arrived in Japan in January 2008. “My husband visited Japan in 1994 and had a homestay experience with a Japanese family. He was treated very well by his host family, almost like a real son. I’d also heard from my acquaintances that Japanese people were very kind. Our daughter got very ill during the flight to Japan, so she went straight to a hospital upon arrival. She was very well taken care of, so well that it made me understand just how good Japanese people are.”
    Japan is the first country she’d been posted to as an ambassador’s wife. “I like casual socializing; formal situations aren’t my cup of tea. So I was very nervous when we paid a visit to the Imperial Palace,” she says. “When the Empress spoke to us, she was quite friendly even though the meeting was rather formal. I was anxious, but she made me relax.”
    Mrs. Aisha attends official ceremonies and is required to socialize and take part in activities not only with Japanese, but also with diplomats and ambassadors’ wives from other countries. “At first, I felt under pressure when people paid attention to me, my dress and my speech,” says Mrs. Aisha. “I got homesick because back home I always spend a lot of time with my parents and sisters.”

    201504-2-2

    City of Nizwa

    “It was thanks to my work experience for a bank in Oman that I got over my homesickness,” says Mrs. Aisha. “I dealt with so many types of people, including fishermen, merchants and businessmen, that I became open as a person. We have many foreigners that work in our country, so the culture is international. That’s why I’ve learned to deal with people from different countries in a friendly and polite manner, I think. My husband and children and the friends I made in Japan cured my homesickness, and I ended up becoming a stronger person, as I kept saying to myself that it was all for my family and country.”
    “My first concern about living in Japan was our children,” says Mrs. Aisha. “Before coming to Japan, we were posted in the UK for six months. Our children were 15, 13 and eight years old. We moved twice in such a short time that it must have been hard for them to get used to their new schools and make new friends. I was relieved they were fortunately transferred to good schools here in Japan and they adapted quite well.”
    She had a hard time with the language and with food. As a Muslim, she consumes neither pork nor alcohol. “There were few expatriates in the area where we first lived. So supermarkets there had very few products with English labels. I didn’t know which ones to buy from those that didn’t have English on. My daughter and I once gave up and went home without buying anything,” she says.
    “My daughter loved potato chips sold at the convenience stores, but once she learned enough Japanese at school to read the ingredients, she was disappointed to find out that some pork-derived ingredients were used. That said, Islam is a flexible religion, so it’s not a problem if you ate something without knowing,” says Mrs. Aisha. “We have no more problems now as our chef cooks for us at home and we have a few international stores with English labels near to the embassy. I myself have learned some Japanese phrases such as ‘I can’t eat pork,’” she laughs.

    201504-2-3

    Bahla Citadel

    The punctuality of the Japanese and the fact that things are planned several months in advance were pleasant surprises for her. “Whenever we go home to Oman during summer holidays, our relatives suggest we stay longer. Everyone’s surprised when I tell them we have to return because we already have plans for September. I suppose Japanese punctuality comes from the fact that they were raised to respect and value the importance of time. The Japanese way of doing things is good for living comfortably,” she says.
    Located in the southeastern part of the Arabian Peninsula, Oman is a country that has prospered from maritime trade since ancient times. A member of Oman’s royal family has Japanese blood and the country is well known for its friendliness towards Japanese. Historical buildings such as the Bahla and Nizwa Forts, the Royal Palace, and mosques are popular with tourists. Although the Middle East is a region unfamiliar to most Japanese, its resorts are well-known in Europe. Oman’s beaches are teeming with foreign tourists enjoying their vacations.
    “Most Japanese must think Oman is a desert country,” says Mrs. Aisha. “Of course, our desert is enormous, but we also have beautiful beaches and oases. The climate in the mountains is good throughout the year and marvelous resorts are everywhere. It’s a stable and safe country security-wise, so please do come for sightseeing. Cherry trees presented by Japan blossom every February in Oman’s Jabal Akhdar. We also have Japanese gardens.”
    “You can enjoy wonderful cuisine in Oman. As many traditional dishes use rice and fish, Japanese people will feel at home, I think. Besides, Oman is a country with lots of international influences. From Lebanese food, to Indian, to Southeast Asian, to Western, and to fast food, we have all kinds of restaurants where you can taste delicacies from both the sea and the land.”

    201504-2-4

    Frankincense

    “Oman produces a fragrant resin called frankincense. The quality of Oman’s frankincense is the highest in the world and its trade has a very long history. Omanis not only burn it, but also chew it like chewing gum, drink it in liquid form and use it for skin care. Nowadays perfumes, body creams, and lotions are made from frankincense. Oman’s dates are also of very high quality.”
    “The Omanis and the Japanese have a lot in common: our hospitality, respect for elders, and the way we take off our shoes before entering the home and sit on the floor. What’s more, Japanese wash their hands at the entrance when they go to a Shinto shrine, don’t they? That’s like us, too; we Muslims also wash our hands before praying,” says Mrs. Aisha. “Oman is a wonderful country. I’m sure tourists would return to visit again.”
    Oman Embassy
    Text: SAZAKI Ryo
    Photos courtesy by KOSUGI Yurika[2015年4月号掲載記事]

    オマーン国大使夫人
    アビール・アイシャさん
    2011年3月、東日本大震災と原発事故で被災した福島県のメーカーが、総額約26億円もの浄水器の注文を受けました。しかも「完成した浄水器は納品前に被災地で使用してよい」という内容でした。「わが国が日本の友人たちに対してできる最小限の支援だったと思います」とアビール・アイシャ大使夫人は控えめに話します。
    夫人は2008年1月に来日しました。「夫は1994年に来日し、2ヵ月間ホームステイしたことがあります。ホストファミリーには実の息子のようによくしていただきました。また知人たちからも、日本人は親切だと聞いていました。日本へのフライトで娘はひどく酔ってしまい、空港に着いてすぐに病院へ直行しました。そのときの手当てがすばらしくて、日本人がいい人たちだというのは本当だとわかりました」と言います。
    夫人にとって日本は、大使夫人として赴任した初めての国です。「私は気さくなお付き合いが好きで、堅苦しい場が苦手です。ですから皇居を訪問したときにはとても緊張していました」と言います。「会合はフォーマルだったにもかかわらず、皇后さまはとても気さくに話しかけてくださいました。固くなっていた私もリラックスできました」。
    大使夫人は公的なセレモニーにも出席しますし、日本人だけでなく、各国の外交官や大使夫人たちとの交際や活動に参加する必要もあります。「最初のころは私自身、服装、話し方まで注目されるのがプレッシャーでした」と夫人。「オマーンでは両親や姉妹と多くの時間を過ごしていたのでホームシックになりました」。

    「乗り越えられたのは、オマーンで銀行に勤めていた経験のおかげです」と夫人は言います。「漁師や商人、ビジネスマンなどいろいろな人に心を開けるようになりました。わが国には外国人が多いので、文化が国際的です。おかげでいろいろな国の人に対して親しく、礼儀正しく接することができるようになりました。ホームシックは主人と子どもたち、そして日本でできた友達が癒してくれましたし、家族と国のためと思うと私も強くなれました」。
    「日本で暮らすにあたって、まず心配だったのは子どもたちです」と夫人。「私たちは日本へ来る前、イギリスに6ヵ月間赴任していました。子どもたちは15歳、13歳、8歳でした。短期間に引越しが続き、学校に慣れるのも、友達をつくるのも大変だったと思います。幸い、いい学校に転入でき、うまくなじめたので安心しました」。
    大変だったのは言葉と食べ物です。夫人はイスラム教徒なので豚肉とお酒を口にしません。「最初に住んだ地域には外国人がほとんどいませんでした。ですからスーパーには英語で表記された品物がほとんどなく、英語で書かれていないものはどれを買っていいかわかりませんでした。娘と二人で、結局あきらめて何も買わずに帰ったことがあります」と夫人は言います。
    「娘はコンビニに売っているポテトチップスが大好きでしたが、学校で日本語を習って成分表示が読めるようになり、豚由来の材料が使われていることを知ってがっかりしていました。でもイスラム教はフレキシブルなので、知らずに食べたものは問題になりません」と夫人。「今は家でシェフが料理をしてくれますし、大使館付近には英語表記のある国際的な店がたくさんあるので大丈夫です。私も『豚肉はだめです』などの日本語を覚えました」と笑います。

    日本人が時間に正確なことや、予定が数ヵ月前から決まることは夫人にとって新鮮でした。「夏休みにオマーンへ帰ると、親戚がもっと泊っていきなさいと勧めます。もう9月に予定が入っているから帰らなければと言うとみんなが驚きますよ。日本人は時間の大切さを聞かされて育っているので、時間を守れるのでしょうね。日本の物事に対するすすめ方は、生活しやすくていいと感じます」と言います。
    オマーンはアラビア半島の南東部にあり、古くから海上貿易で栄えてきた国です。王族の中には日本人の血を引く人もいて、とても親日的な国として知られています。ニズワやバハラ城の砦など歴史的な建造物や、王宮やモスクなどの建築が観光客に人気です。日本人にとって中東はまだなじみの薄い地域ですが、ヨーロッパでは夏のリゾート地として知られており、オマーンのビーチでも多くの外国人観光客が休暇を楽しんでいます。
    「多くの日本人は、オマーンを砂漠の国だと思っているでしょう」と夫人。「もちろん我が国の砂漠は広大ですが、美しい海岸やオアシスもあります。山間部では年間を通じて気候がよくて、すばらしいリゾート地が各地にあります。治安もよく安定しているのでぜひ観光に来てください。日本から贈られた桜は毎年2月にオマーン・ジャベル・アフダールで咲きますし、日本庭園もありますよ」。
    「オマーンではすばらしい食事を楽しめます。伝統的な料理には米を使ったものや魚料理がたくさんあるので、日本の方には親しみが持てると思いますよ。また、オマーンは国際的な国です。レバノン料理やインド料理、東南アジアや欧米の料理、ファストフード店まで、さまざまなスタイルの店があって海の幸と陸の幸の両方が味わえます」。

    「オマーンでは乳香という樹脂の香料が取れます。オマーン産の乳香は世界最高といわれる品質で、その貿易はとても長い歴史を持っています。オマーン人は乳香をたくだけでなく、ガムのようにかんだり、液体状にして飲んだり肌の手入れに使ったりもします。現在では乳香から香水、ハンドクリーム、ローションが作られていますよ。それにナツメヤシも、オマーン産のものはとても高品質です」。
    「オマーン人と日本人には共通点がたくさんあります。おもてなしの精神や高齢者を尊敬する習慣、家の中に入る前に靴を脱ぐことや床に座ることも似ています。それに日本人は、神社へ行ったとき入口で手を洗いますね。イスラム教徒も礼拝の前には手を洗うので、似ていると感じます」と夫人。「オマーンはとてもすばらしい国で、観光客は必ずリピーターになりますよ」。
    オマーン大使館
    文:砂崎良
    撮影協力:小杉ゆりか

    Read More
  • If Manga is Engaging, it’s Welcomed by Readers Worldwide

    [From April Issue 2015]
    201504-3
    In February 2015, the awards ceremony for the Eighth International Manga Awards was held in Minato City, Tokyo Prefecture. It’s an open contest for manga created outside Japan. It’s organized by Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Japan Foundation – a cultural organization specializing in international cultural exchanges and Japanese language education. The Japan Cartoonists’ Association and publishers of manga magazines are also involved. This time, 317 works from 46 countries/regions were submitted and 15 of them won awards. The award winning works from Asia, the West, the Middle East and Africa reflected the continuing expansion and development of manga culture.
    Gold and Silver Award winners are invited to Japan to meet Japanese cartoonists and to visit publishers and other manga-related sites. This year’s Gold Award was given to Nambaral ERDENEBAYAR from Mongolia. Luo mu from China, Ben WONG from Malaysia, and 61Chi from Taiwan were selected for the Silver Award. Though 61Chi had a prior engagement, the other three winners came to Japan.
    “Bumbardai,” Erdenebayar’s award winning work, depicts the close relationship of a nomadic mother and child. “I want to continue depicting the traditional life of nomads. I’d also like to explore the subject of Mongolian folklore,” says Erdenebayar. “I loved Doraemon as a child. I went to the Fujiko・F・Fujio Museum during this stay in Japan and it was like a dream come true.”
    Luo mu, who won her award for “Mr. Bear,” a story about a boy in a bear costume, has been drawing manga for only a year or two. “I’m still quite inexperienced when it comes to drawing manga and constructing stories, so I was both surprised and delighted when I learned about the award,” she says. “I’ll continue to do my best now that I’ve been commissioned to do a series. I’d like to create heart-warming works in the future.”
    Ben Wong who won his award for “Atan,” a story about a boy and a water buffalo, is a talented cartoonist who’d already won an award at the first International Manga Awards. “I became a manga writer because I thought it was a good business opportunity. My entrepreneurial spirit was stimulated by the possibility of success and by the risks involved,” he says. “From now on, I’d like to expand into educational manga,” he said about his ambitions for the future.
    “There was a time when it was said that Japanese manga wasn’t up to world standards. Japanese cartoonists, however, instead of trying to adapt to this, only depicted what would please readers,” said cartoonist SATONAKA Machiko, chief judge. “In whichever country manga is drawn, readers will welcome it as long as it’s fun. And by sharing stories, we get to know about each other’s cultures,” she said, giving words of encouragement to the winners.
    “The level of the art work was so high and the stories were so well constructed that these works might as well have been published in Japan,” says SAITO Yuko from the Cultural Affairs and Overseas Public Relations Division of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. “I hope these awards will one day be loved by cartoonists and readers throughout the whole world.” The application period for the next International Manga Award is expected to be from mid-April to late May.
    International Manga Award
    Text: SAZAKI Ryo[2015年4月号掲載記事]

    2015年2月、東京都港区で第8回国際漫画賞の授賞式が行われました。この賞は公募制で、日本国外で制作されたまんがを対象にしています。日本の外務省と海外の文化交流や日本語教育を行っている文化団体の国際交流基金が主催。日本漫画家協会やまんが雑誌を発行している出版社なども協力しています。今回は46の国と地域から317作品が集まり、15作品に賞が与えられました。受賞作にはアジア、欧米、中東、アフリカの作品があり、まんが文化の広がりと発展が感じられました。
    最優秀賞と優秀賞の受賞者は日本に招待され、日本の漫画家と交流したり、出版社やまんがに関わりのある場所を訪問したりします。今回の最優秀賞はモンゴルのナンバラル・エルデネバヤルさんに贈られました。優秀賞には中国の落木さん、マレーシアのベン・ウォンさん、台湾の61Chiさんが選ばれ、都合のつかなかった61Chiさんを除く3名が来日しました。
    エルデネバヤルさんの受賞作品「ボンバルダイ」は、遊牧民の生活を通して母と子の絆を描いたものです。「これからも遊牧民の伝統的な生活を描きたいです。モンゴルの民話も題材にしたいですね」とエルデネバヤルさん。「子どもの頃、ドラえもんが大好きでした。今回の来日で藤子・F・不二雄ミュージアムに行けて夢のようです」。
    クマの着ぐるみを着た少年の話「クマさん」で受賞した落木さんは、まんがを描き始めてまだ1、2年です。「まんがの描き方もストーリーの作り方もまだまだ未熟ですので、受賞を知ったときにはとても驚き、同時に嬉しかったです」と言います。「新しい作品の連載も決まったのでがんばりたいです。心温まる作品を描いていきたいですね」。
    少年と水牛の物語「アタン」で受賞したベン・ウォンさんは、第1回国際漫画賞でも受賞した実力者です。「私が漫画家になったのは、ビジネスチャンスがあると思ったからです。リスキーですが成功も狙える点にベンチャー精神を刺激されました」と言います。「今後は、教育まんがにも手を広げていきたいですね」と抱負を語ります。
    「日本のまんがは世界のスタンダードに合っていないと言われた時代もありました。でも日本の漫画家たちはそれに合わせようとはせず、読者が面白いと思うものだけを描いてきました」と漫画家の里中満智子審査委員長は述べました。「どこの国の人が描いたまんがでも、面白ければ読者は受け入れます。そして物語を共有することで、私たちはお互いの文化を知ることができます」と受賞者を激励しました。
    「どの作品も、日本で発表されてもおかしくないと思うほど絵のレベルが高く、ストーリーも巧みでした」と外務省文化交流・海外広報課の齋藤有子さんは言います。「この賞が世界中の漫画家や読者に愛される賞になるといいですね」。次回の国際漫画賞の募集期間は4月中旬から5月末の予定です。
    国際漫画賞
    文:砂崎良

    Read More
  • Yoshimi-Hyakuana

    [From April Issue 2015]

    This unique and ancient burial mound consists of numerous caves dug into the rocky hillside. It’s thought that many caves are horizontal burial pits dating from the late Kofun era (6-7th centuries) and at the time of writing 219 have been counted as such. It’s possible to enter some of the caves, while others with their naturally-occurring luminous moss – designated as a protected species – can be viewed and photographed from behind a fence. In the springtime cherry blossoms can be enjoyed on the Hyakuana burial grounds and its environs. There is also a cave built to house a munitions factory during World War II that is often used as a location for television dramas.
    Directions: Take the Tobu line to Higashi-Matsuyama Station. Then take the Kawagoe Kanko Bus heading towards Konosu License Center and get off at the “Hyakuana Iriguchi (entrance)” stop. From there it is only a five minute walk. Or you can take the JR Takasaki Line to Konosu Station, then take the Kawagoe Kanko bus bound for Higashi-Matsuyama Station and get off at the “Hyakuana Iriguchi” stop. From there it is only a five minute walk.
    Hours of Operation: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    Entrance fees: 300 yen for adults and children of junior high school age or over, 200 yen for elementary students and free to children not yet in elementary school.
    Open 365 days a year
    Yoshimi-Hyakuana
    Text: KAWARATANI Tokiko[2015年4月号掲載記事]

    岩山一面にたくさんの穴が見られるユニークな古墳群。古墳時代末期(6~7世紀)の横穴墓と考えられ、確認されているだけで219個。中に入れる横穴もある。国指定の天然記念物ヒカリゴケが自生している横穴もあり、フェンス越しでの撮影が可能。春は百穴構内と付近の桜が楽しめる。第二次世界大戦中に軍需工場目的で掘られた洞窟があり、テレビドラマなどのロケによく使われている。
    交通:東武東松山駅下車。川越観光バス鴻巣免許センター行き「百穴入口」下車、徒歩5分、または、JR高崎線鴻巣駅下車 川越観光バス東松山駅行き「百穴入口」下車、徒歩約5分
    入園時間:午前8時30分~午後5時
    入園料:中学生以上300円 小学生200円 小学生未満無料
    年中無休
    吉見百穴
    文:瓦谷登貴子

    Read More
  • Origin Bento

    [From April Issue 2015]

    Origin Bento, a shop that sells side dishes and obento (pack lunches) to go, has a total of 566 stores in the Kanto and Kansai areas. There are more than 30 varieties of obento box available. The company prides itself on preparing dishes in store with healthy seasonal ingredients rich in nutrients that contain no artificial colorings or preservatives. Side dishes are arranged on a large platter in a glass display case at the counter and can be bought for 183 yen per 100 grams. The menu is altered according to the season.

    [No. 1] Nori (Seaweed) Bento 299 yen

    Okaka (bonito flakes), nori, and deep fried fish are served on a bed of rice. This standard bento dish is popular with people of all ages.
    201504-5-2

    [No. 2] Nori Deep Fried Chicken Bento 399 yen

    Deep fried chicken with a side serving of cabbage served on a bed of rice topped with okaka and nori.
    201504-5-3

    [No. 3] Half a Serving of the Recommended Daily Vegetable Intake
    Six Stir-fried Vegetables Bento 504 yen

    Cabbage, bell peppers, onions, carrots, komatsuna (Japanese mustard spinach), and moyashi (bean sprouts) stir-fried in soy sauce. A flavor you’ll never tire of. Only available in the Kanto area.
    201504-5-4
    Origin Bento[2015年4月号掲載記事]

    「オリジン弁当」は関東地区と関西地区で566店舗を展開している、持ち帰り用のお総菜とお弁当の店。お弁当の種類は30種類以上。合成着色料や保存料は使わず、店内で調理した商品を提供していること、安全な食材を使い、野菜は栄養価の高い旬のものを使っているのが特徴。ショーケースには大皿に盛られた総菜が並び、100グラム183円で買うことができる。季節にあわせてメニューは変わる。

    【No.1】のり弁当 299円

    ごはんの上におかか、のり、魚のフライなどが載っている。お弁当の定番で、年齢問わず人気。

    【No.2】のりチキン竜田弁当 399円

    おかかとのりが載ったごはんと、チキン竜田(鶏肉の唐揚げ)にキャベツを添えた組み合わせ。

    【No.3】一日に必要な野菜の半分使用 6品目の野菜炒め弁当 504円

    キャベツ、ピーマン、玉ねぎ、ニンジン、小松菜、もやしを醤油味でいためた。あきのこない味。関東地区限定。

    オリジン弁当

    Read More
  • Art Brings Out People’s Real Feelings

    [From April Issue 2015]

    CHO Hikaru / ZHAO Ye
    Artist
    “I think the phrase ‘it’s beautiful’ is a phrase people formulate in their minds when they’ve seen something that has made an impression on them. So, when I receive such a compliment, I’m not happy because I don’t know if my artwork has really touched that person’s heart,” artist CHO Hikaru says. “If someone who sees my painting frowns involuntarily and says, ‘Yuck,’ it makes me happy because I feel like I’ve heard their true opinion.”
    Cho mainly paints. Although she is still in her junior year in the Visual Communication Design department of Musashino Art University, she’s already known for working in a variety of fields, including painting, producing videos, and designing characters. Having entered into a contract with an apparel manufacturer, she also designs clothes and tights.
    Cho became famous for her body painting, by painting realistic-looking art onto people’s skin. “When I was preparing for my entrance exams for art school, I had to paint still lifes every day. Then, I got fed up and wanted to make pictures of humans, so I tried painting an eye. I did it on the back of my hand because the art supplies I was using back then were expensive and only available at an inconveniently located store, which made it troublesome to go buy them,” she says with a laugh.
    She loved the eye she had painted on her hand so much that she posted a picture of it on Twitter. Then, it was retweeted more than a thousand times. Cho says: “In those days, ‘Parasyte,’ a manga series about creatures living inside human bodies, was becoming popular; people thought my eye painting resembled one of these parasites and found it funny. I suppose they were also drawn to the fact that this weird painting had been done by a young woman.”
    Knowing that trends quickly come and go in the world of the Internet, Cho thought her post would soon be forgotten. But even after six months, it was still getting retweeted. But the positive feedback didn’t stop there and before long she was being asked to perform on TV programs. When she exhibited her work requests came in from people who wanted to collaborate with her.
    “I became famous before I had completed my artistic training, so I was criticized by some people who said that any artist could easily paint that kind of picture,” Cho says. “When I come across remarks badmouthing me or my works on the web, I take screenshots of them to reread later. I find them both instructive and funny. I’m the kind of person who can put things in perspective,” she says with a wry smile.
    “I think the reason I turned out this way is partly because I was born in Japan to Chinese parents,” says Cho. “I’m treated as a Chinese person in Japan, and have to have my fingerprints and picture recorded when I enter the country, as if I were a potential criminal. In China, I’m viewed as more of a Japanese person because of my poor Chinese.”
    “But because of this upbringing, I learned to look objectively at the way countries tend to strengthen unity by looking down on other countries,” says Cho. “It’s not what it seems” is a picture of a banana painted to look like a cucumber and is Cho’s favorite of her works to date. “I wanted to ask, ‘What can you tell about who someone is on the inside, just by looking at their skin color, nationality and other external aspects?’”
    CHO Hikaru
    Text: SAZAKI Ryo[2015年4月号掲載記事]

    アーティスト
    趙 燁 さん
    「『きれいですね』は、人が何かを見て受けた印象を心の中で整理してから口にする言葉だと思うんです。ですからそうほめられても、自分のアートがその人の心に本当に届いたのかわからなくて、嬉しくありません」とアーティストの趙ひかるさんは言います。「私の絵を見た人が反射的に顔をしかめて『きもっ(気持ち悪い)』と言うのを聞くと、今この人の本音が聞けたと感じて嬉しいですね」。
    趙さんは、ペイントを中心に活動しています。武蔵野美術大学視覚伝達デザイン学科の3年生ですが、すでに絵画や映像作品、キャラクターデザインなど、さまざまな活動で知られています。アパレルメーカーと契約して、服やタイツのデザインもしています。
    趙さんを有名にしたのは、人の皮膚にリアルに描くボディーペイントです。「美大志望の受験生だったとき、毎日静物を描かなければなりませんでした。それで、もういやだ人間を描きたい、と思って目を描いたのです。自分の手の甲に描いたのは、当時使っていた画材が高価な上、不便な場所で売っていて買いに行くのが面倒だったからです」と笑います。
    手に描いた目が気に入った趙さんは、その写真をツイッターに載せました。すると1000以上リツイートされました。「当時、人体に生き物が寄生するというまんが『寄生獣』が評判になっていたので、寄生獣みたいな絵だと面白がられました。若い女の子が変な絵を描いているということも話題性があったのだと思います」と趙さん。
    趙さんは、ネットの世界は流行り廃りが激しいので、すぐに忘れられるだろうと思っていました。しかしリツイートは半年後も続いていました。反響はやまず、やがてテレビ局からも出演依頼が来たり展示などをしたとき、一緒に仕事をしたいと声をかけてくれる人が現れたりするようになりました。
    「鍛錬をつむ前に有名になってしまったので、この程度の絵はだれにでも描けると批判されることもありました」と趙さん。「ネット上で私や私の作品をけなす発言を見ると、スクリーンショットを撮っておいて後で見返します。参考にもなるし、面白いとも思ってしまいます。物事を俯瞰(全体を上から見ること)して見る性格なので」とシニカルにほほえみます。
    「私がこのような性格になったのは、中国人の両親のもと日本に生まれ育った影響があると思います」と趙さん。「日本では中国人と扱われ、入国の際に指紋と顔写真を記録されます。まるで犯罪者予備軍扱いです。中国では、中国語が下手なので日本側の人間と見なされます」と語ります。
    「でもこの生まれ育ちのおかげで、他国をおとしめて自分たちの団結を強めようとする動きを、距離を置いて見ることができるようになりました」と趙さん。趙さんはお気に入りとして、バナナに色を塗ってキュウリに見せかけた作品「It’s not what it seems」を挙げます。「人間の肌の色や国籍といった外側だけを見て、その人の内面の何がわかるの?と言いたかったのです」。
    趙 燁 さん
    文:砂崎良

    Read More
  • Manufacturer of Ready-made Foods Invented “Ochazuke Nori”

    [From April Issue 2015]

    Nagatanien
    Tea in its many forms is deeply connected to Japanese history and culture. One of the most popular teas consumed today is sencha; a green tea invented by NAGATANI Soshichiro – founder of what was to become Nagatanien Co., Ltd. – in the Edo era (17-19th centuries). That is to say that originally the Nagatani family ran a tea production business. Sencha was eventually exported to Western countries and, along with raw silk thread, became one of Japan’s major exports.
    In 1952, NAGATANI Yoshio, the tenth Nagatani to run the family business, developed “Ochazuke Nori” with his father Takezo so that people could easily consume delicious ochazuke (a dish of rice and tea) at home. At that time ochazuke nori was powdered shredded seaweed, seasoning, and arare (rice crackers) mixed together by hand. As neither aluminum foil nor polyethylene was available in those days, to prevent humidity from spoiling the seaweed, 100 bags of double the usual thickness were stored in a bottle that had a layer of lime placed inside its base.
    Sales of Ochazuke Nori steadily increased and it eventually became a hit product nationwide. In 1953, a year after the product was launched, Yoshio established Nagatanien Honpo Co., Ltd. He subsequently created a series of long selling products such as “Matsutake no Aji Osuimono,” “Sake Chazuke,” “Asage” and “Sushi Taro,” all of which can still be found in stores today.
    In 1979, a man, who was in charge of the production department, was chosen to be the company’s first “idle employee.” Yoshio told him, “You don’t have to come to work. You can spend as much as you want. You don’t need to report back. Eat whatever you want and come up with something in two years.” Having created a series of hit products, Yoshio knew that “good ideas don’t only surface when you’re sitting at a desk.”
    The man from the production department followed his orders and, searching for ideas for new products, traveled extensively sampling food both in and outside of Japan. Two years later, he ended up launching “Mabo Harusame,” a combination of “Chinese soup” and “harusame” (thin noodles). Mabo Harusame, the world’s first instant Chinese food, was a big hit. Along with this product, the dish itself became popular nationwide.
    In 2003, the A-Label range for people with food allergies was created. During the developmental stage, some employees voiced concerns that it would be hard to maintain quality without eggs, milk and flour, but these difficulties were overcome with the launch of a curry in a sealed plastic pouch and furikake (dried seasoning for rice). In response to an unexpected influx of positive comments from mothers – such as “I’ve been waiting for a product like this” and “Please create more products like this in the future” – more resources are being allocated to product development and the marketing of this range.
    At the time of writing, the “What are you going to put on Japan?” project, to get consumers to suggest new ways of eating Ochazuke Nori, is underway. Ochazuke, made of typical ingredients used in Japanese cuisine such as rice, tea and seaweed, is likened to Japan itself. “Ochazuke cars” are now traveling around Japan showcasing recipes that incorporate local delicacies.
    Nagatanien Co., Ltd.
    Text: ITO Koichi[2015年4月号掲載記事]

    永谷園
    お茶は日本の歴史と文化に関係の深い飲み物で、たくさんの種類があります。このうち、今日でも広く飲まれている煎茶は株式会社永谷園の創始者となる永谷宗七郎さんが江戸時代(17~19世紀)に発明しました。つまり、永谷家はもともと製茶業を営んでいたのです。やがて煎茶は欧米各国に輸出されるようになり、生糸と並んで日本を代表する商品となりました。
    10代目の永谷嘉男さんは1952年、家庭でおいしいお茶漬けが簡単に食べられるようにと父の武蔵さんと一緒に「お茶づけ海苔」を開発しました。お茶づけ海苔は刻み海苔、調味粉、あられを手作業で合わせたものでした。アルミ箔もポリエチレンもない時代なので、海苔が湿気ないよう袋を二重にし、底に石灰を敷いたびんに100袋ずつ詰めました。
    お茶づけ海苔は順調に売り上げを伸ばし、全国的なヒット商品に成長。嘉男さんは発売翌年の1953年に株式会社永谷園本舗を設立しました。嘉男さんはその後も「松茸の味お吸いもの」「さけ茶づけ」「あさげ」「すし太郎」など、今日でも店頭に並ぶロングセラー商品を続々と生み出しました。
    1979年、ある開発担当者は同社初の「ぶらぶら社員」に選ばれます。嘉男さんは「出社は自由。経費も無制限。報告も不要。食べたいものを食べて、2年後に結果を出
    せ」と命じました。ヒット商品を次々に作った嘉男さんは「良いアイディアが浮かぶのは、机に向かっている時だけではない」と考えていたからです。
    開発担当者は命令に従い、国内外をくまなく食べ歩いて新商品のアイディアを探し続けました。2年後、「中華スープ」と「春雨」を組み合わせた「麻婆春雨」を送り出すことになります。麻婆春雨はそれまで世界のどこにもなかった中華おかずの素として大ヒット。商品と共に、この料理自体も全国に広まっていきました。
    2003年には食物アレルギーに配慮したA-Labelシリーズが生まれました。開発中には、卵や乳、小麦を使わずに同じ品質を保つのは困難という声もありましたが、苦労の末にレトルトカレーとふりかけを販売。「こういう商品を待っていました」「これからも増やしてください」という母親の声が予想以上に多いため、この分野の商品開発、普及活動に力を注いでいます。
    現在はお茶づけの新しい食べ方を提案するプロジェクト「日本の上に何のせる?」を行っています。米、お茶、海苔など、日本を代表する食材でできているお茶づけを、日本に例えました。「お茶づけカー」が日本各地をまわり、それぞれの名産品を取り入れたレシピを紹介しています。
    株式会社永谷園
    文:伊藤公一

    Read More
  • Utilizing Japanese Language Proficiency to Secure a Dream Job

    [From April Issue 2015]

    Nate SHURILLA
    “The other day when I went to a business networking event for various companies and made a presentation in Japanese, so many people rushed up to me to exchange business cards that I ran out,” says Nate SHURILLA in fluent Japanese. “Also, when I was job hunting, a broader range of options opened up to me because I could speak Japanese; this resulted in a job offer from one of Japan’s main mega banks. The ability to speak the native language gives you a huge advantage when it comes to securing a job in a foreign country.”
    Shurilla hails from the state of Wisconsin in America. “Before he got married, my father lived in Japan doing volunteer work for his church, and used to discuss his memories of this experience with me and taught me simple Japanese. Through this, I became interested in Japan, too, and elected to learn the Japanese language in my middle and high school years.” When it came time for him to enter secondary education, Shurilla applied to do volunteer work for his church and went to Japan, just like his father.
    At first, Shurilla was shocked because it was so difficult for him to understand spoken Japanese. “My first placement was in Yamagata Prefecture where I couldn’t understand a word the old people spoke. Later I understood that they had a unique dialect. However, the experience had a huge impact on me at the time and it made me think I had to study more Japanese. At the same time, though, I understood that the conversation would continue even when I did not understand the words, if I just smiled and said, ‘I see, I see,’” he jokes.
    Shurilla decided to study ten new words, two new grammar rules, and five new kanji every day. “I used store-bought flashcards and also read books. The first book I read had about 200 pages. It began to make sense at around page 150,” he says.
    When his two years of volunteer work came to a close Shurilla returned home and went to college. There he chose to take classes in Japanese where he studied grammar and the cultural background of Japanese expressions. “Thanks to the grammar lessons, I could systemize knowledge I acquired during my stay in Japan. Also, understanding Japanese culture is very important. For instance, I think the greeting ‘otsukaresama desu’ (thank you for your work) is uniquely Japanese. Bearing in mind that it comes from appreciating other people’s hard work and being considerate of their fatigue, you would know in which situations to use the expression.”
    When he was a college senior, Shurilla sat for the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) N1 and passed. He then applied for the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Programme and returned to Japan. “I returned to Japan because the earnestness and diligence of the Japanese people had made a big impact on me during my previous stay and I had begun to love Japan,” he says. “While working in Japan, there was a period when I was bothered by the interference of my direct supervisor, but I overcame that by talking to another boss at a higher level.”
    Now, Shurilla is working for a marketing company in Tokyo. “If you speak your native language and Japanese and have some kind of skill, like programming, you can find many job opportunities in Tokyo,” he says. “I am now involved in ‘Around Akiba,’ a project to promote the appeal of Akihabara to the world. I feel it’s an advantage to be able to speak Japanese, particularly when doing interviews.”

    Text: SAZAKI Ryo[2015年4月号掲載記事]

    ネイト・シュリラさん
    「先日、異業種交流会へ行って日本語でプレゼンをしたところ、名刺交換を希望する人が殺到して名刺がなくなってしまいました」とネイト・シュリラさんは流ちょうな日本語で言います。「就職活動をしたときも、日本語ができることで可能性が広がり、日本を代表するメガバンクからも声がかかりました。外国で就職するには、その国の言葉を話せることが大きな強みになります」。
    シュリラさんはウィスコンシン州出身のアメリカ人です。「父は結婚前に、教会のボランティア活動で日本に住んだことがあり、思い出話をしたり簡単な日本語を教えてくれたりしました。それで私も日本に興味を持つようになって、中学・高校で日本語を選択しました」。大学に進学したシュリラさんは、お父さんと同じように教会のボランティアに志願して来日しました。
    当初、シュリラさんはあまりにも日本語が聞き取れないことにショックを受けました。「最初の派遣先は山形県で、お年寄りの言うことがまったくわかりませんでした。後に山形には独特の方言があることを知ったのですが、当時は衝撃で、もっと日本語を勉強しなくてはと思いました。同時に、聞き取れないときはほほえんで『そうですか、そうですか』と言えば会話は成り立つことを学びましたね」と冗談を言います。
    シュリラさんは毎日単語を10個、文法規則を2つ、漢字を5つ覚えることにしました。「市販のフラッシュカードを使いました。それから本を読みました。最初に読んだのは200ページくらいの本でしたが、150ページあたりから理解できるようになりました」と言います。
    2年間のボランティアを終えて帰国したシュリラさんは大学に戻りました。そして日本語の授業を選択して、文法や日本語の表現の裏にある文化を学びました。「文法の授業のおかげで、日本滞在中に得た知識を体系的なものにできました。また、文化の理解はとても重要です。例えば『お疲れ様です』というあいさつは日本特有のものだと思います。相手がたくさん働いたことへの感謝やその疲れを思いやる気持ちがこもっていることを理解すると、どういうときに使われるかわかります」。
    シュリラさんは大学4年のとき、N1を受けて合格しました。そしてJETプログラムに応募して再来日しました。「前回の来日で日本人のまじめさや勤勉さにふれて、日本が好きになったからです」と言います。「日本で働いている間には、直属の上司に嫌がらせをされて困った時期もありましたが、さらに上の上司に相談して乗り越えま
    した」。
    今、シュリラさんは東京のマーケティング会社で働いています。「自国語と日本語、そして何かのスキル、例えばプログラミングができるなどの技能があれば、今の東京には仕事を得る機会がたくさんありますよ」と言います。「私は今、秋葉原の魅力を海外へ発信するプロジェクト『Around Akiba』に携わっています。特に取材のとき、日本語ができてよかったと感じますね」。

    文:砂崎良

    Read More
  • The Unfortunate Fate of a Young Man Who Tried to Play God

    [From April Issue 2015]

    Death Note
    This story portrays the fate of a young man who comes into possession of “Death Note,” a notebook that enables him to control death itself. The tale was serialized in “Weekly Shonen Jump” from December 2003 to May 2006. In Japan alone 30 million copies of the entire series have been printed, and it has also been translated into a number of different languages around the world. It’s hugely popular both at home and abroad.
    One day YAGAMI Light picks up a black notebook with the words “DEATH NOTE” written on it. Instructions written on the back of the front cover state that simply by writing a person’s name in the book it’s possible to kill them. Some days after, the notebook’s owner, the death god Ryuk, appears before him. But Light is not astonished because having already used the notebook to indiscriminately kill criminals, he has come to believe that the notebook possesses a mysterious power.
    There are various restrictions on using the Death Note. Most important being that the name and the face of the victim must match. Light kills a succession of brutal criminals, whose names and faces appear on the news. When this series of suspicious deaths occurs, it’s not long before a rumor begins to circulate that a righteous killer named “Kira” is going around executing bad guys. This has been Light’s intention all along.
    By playing the part of Kira and executing criminals, Light carries out his plan to control people through fear and thereby create a world free of crime. “I will become the God of my new world,” Light declares to Ryuk. At the same time, at the request of Interpol, the mysterious master detective “L” begins looking into the case. By having information on brutal criminals released at different times in different countries, L measures the timing of executions. From this he determines that Kira is in the Kanto region of Japan.
    Light schemes to completely wipe out all the FBI agents sent to investigate the case. Before long L himself comes to Japan. L joins a team heading up the investigation into Kira – a team that includes Light’s own father YAGAMI Soichiro. L eventually comes, on the basis of internal information leaks, into contact with Light and begins to suspect that Light is in fact Kira. Aware he is attracting suspicion, Light also approaches L and offers to help out with the investigation.
    As the battle of wits between the two unfolds the investigation is thrown into chaos when AMANE Misa, a second person suspected of being Kira, arrives on the scene. By manipulating Misa, who adores Kira, Light successfully eliminates L before he’s able to prove that Light is Kira. L’s death, however, is never made public, and Light takes over as a second L, making it seem as if the investigation is still progressing. Behind the scenes, a new world is on its way to being realized.
    A few years later, devotees, who worship Kira as a god, spread throughout the world, and the armies and police agencies of other countries can no longer oppose him. Just when Light is only one step away from dominating the world, two successors to L, Mello and Near, stand in his way. And the three are embroiled in one final showdown. The fate and ultimate demise of Light, who is obsessed with his mission to dispense justice, touches on the universal theme of the “perils of justice.”
    Text: HATTA Emiko

    [2015年4月号掲載記事]

    デスノート

    人の死を操ることができる「デスノート」を手に入れた青年の運命を描く物語。2003年12月から2006年5月まで週刊少年ジャンプに連載されました。日本国内でのシリーズ累計発行部数は3,000万部で、世界各国でも翻訳されています。国内外ともに人気の高い作品です。

    ある日、夜神月は「DEATH NOTE」と書かれた黒いノートを拾います。表紙の裏には、名前を書き込むだけで人を殺すことができるという説明が書かれていました。数日後、ノートの持ち主である死神リュークが現れますが、月は驚きません。ノートが不思議な力を持つ本物だと確信していたからです。月はすでにノートを使って、何人もの犯罪者を殺していました。

    デスノートには様々な制約があります。基本になっているのは、名前と顔が正しく一致していなければならないというルールです。月は名前と顔が報道されている凶悪犯を次々に殺していきます。連続して起こる不審な死に、いつしか悪人を処刑する正義の殺し屋「キラ」のうわさが広がり始めます。それこそが月の狙いでした。

    月は犯罪者を処刑するキラを演じながら、恐怖によって人々を支配し、犯罪のない世界を作る計画を進めていたのです。「新世界の神になる」と月はリュークに宣言します。一方、国際警察の依頼により、謎の名探偵Lが動き始めていました。Lは凶悪犯の情報を公開する時間を国ごとに変えて、処刑されるタイミングを計ります。そしてキラが日本の関東地方にいると推理します。

    FBI捜査官を送り込んだものの、月の策略により全員が死亡。ついにL自身が日本へやって来ます。Lが参加したキラ捜査本部には、月の父親である夜神総一郎がいました。内部からの情報もれを追っていたLは月に接触し、彼こそがキラではないかと疑うようになります。月もまた、疑われていると知りながらLに近づき、捜査への協力を申し出ます。

    お互いに探り合いながら頭脳戦を繰り広げるうちに、第2のキラとして弥海砂が登場し、捜査は混乱します。月はキラを崇拝する海砂を利用して、Lが月をキラだと証明する前にLを殺すことに成功します。しかしLの死は公表されず、月が2代目のLとなり、表面上は捜査が続けられます。その裏で、新世界の実現は着実に進んでいました。

    数年後、キラを神とあがめる信者は世界中に広がり、各国の軍や警察もキラに逆らえなくなっていました。世界を支配するまであと一歩というところで、Lの後継者メロとニアが立ちふさがります。そして3者が絡み合う最終決戦へとなだれ込んでいくのです。自らの正義に取りつかれた月のたどる運命と結末は、「正義の持つ危うさ」という普遍的なテーマを物語っています。

    文:服田恵美子

    Read More