Utilizing Japanese Language Proficiency to Secure a Dream Job

[From April Issue 2015]
201504-8
Nate SHURILLA
“The other day when I went to a business networking event for various companies and made a presentation in Japanese, so many people rushed up to me to exchange business cards that I ran out,” says Nate SHURILLA in fluent Japanese. “Also, when I was job hunting, a broader range of options opened up to me because I could speak Japanese; this resulted in a job offer from one of Japan’s main mega banks. The ability to speak the native language gives you a huge advantage when it comes to securing a job in a foreign country.”
Shurilla hails from the state of Wisconsin in America. “Before he got married, my father lived in Japan doing volunteer work for his church, and used to discuss his memories of this experience with me and taught me simple Japanese. Through this, I became interested in Japan, too, and elected to learn the Japanese language in my middle and high school years.” When it came time for him to enter secondary education, Shurilla applied to do volunteer work for his church and went to Japan, just like his father.
At first, Shurilla was shocked because it was so difficult for him to understand spoken Japanese. “My first placement was in Yamagata Prefecture where I couldn’t understand a word the old people spoke. Later I understood that they had a unique dialect. However, the experience had a huge impact on me at the time and it made me think I had to study more Japanese. At the same time, though, I understood that the conversation would continue even when I did not understand the words, if I just smiled and said, ‘I see, I see,’” he jokes.
Shurilla decided to study ten new words, two new grammar rules, and five new kanji every day. “I used store-bought flashcards and also read books. The first book I read had about 200 pages. It began to make sense at around page 150,” he says.
When his two years of volunteer work came to a close Shurilla returned home and went to college. There he chose to take classes in Japanese where he studied grammar and the cultural background of Japanese expressions. “Thanks to the grammar lessons, I could systemize knowledge I acquired during my stay in Japan. Also, understanding Japanese culture is very important. For instance, I think the greeting ‘otsukaresama desu’ (thank you for your work) is uniquely Japanese. Bearing in mind that it comes from appreciating other people’s hard work and being considerate of their fatigue, you would know in which situations to use the expression.”
When he was a college senior, Shurilla sat for the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) N1 and passed. He then applied for the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Programme and returned to Japan. “I returned to Japan because the earnestness and diligence of the Japanese people had made a big impact on me during my previous stay and I had begun to love Japan,” he says. “While working in Japan, there was a period when I was bothered by the interference of my direct supervisor, but I overcame that by talking to another boss at a higher level.”
Now, Shurilla is working for a marketing company in Tokyo. “If you speak your native language and Japanese and have some kind of skill, like programming, you can find many job opportunities in Tokyo,” he says. “I am now involved in ‘Around Akiba,’ a project to promote the appeal of Akihabara to the world. I feel it’s an advantage to be able to speak Japanese, particularly when doing interviews.”

Text: SAZAKI Ryo[2015年4月号掲載記事]
201504-8
ネイト・シュリラさん
「先日、異業種交流会へ行って日本語でプレゼンをしたところ、名刺交換を希望する人が殺到して名刺がなくなってしまいました」とネイト・シュリラさんは流ちょうな日本語で言います。「就職活動をしたときも、日本語ができることで可能性が広がり、日本を代表するメガバンクからも声がかかりました。外国で就職するには、その国の言葉を話せることが大きな強みになります」。
シュリラさんはウィスコンシン州出身のアメリカ人です。「父は結婚前に、教会のボランティア活動で日本に住んだことがあり、思い出話をしたり簡単な日本語を教えてくれたりしました。それで私も日本に興味を持つようになって、中学・高校で日本語を選択しました」。大学に進学したシュリラさんは、お父さんと同じように教会のボランティアに志願して来日しました。
当初、シュリラさんはあまりにも日本語が聞き取れないことにショックを受けました。「最初の派遣先は山形県で、お年寄りの言うことがまったくわかりませんでした。後に山形には独特の方言があることを知ったのですが、当時は衝撃で、もっと日本語を勉強しなくてはと思いました。同時に、聞き取れないときはほほえんで『そうですか、そうですか』と言えば会話は成り立つことを学びましたね」と冗談を言います。
シュリラさんは毎日単語を10個、文法規則を2つ、漢字を5つ覚えることにしました。「市販のフラッシュカードを使いました。それから本を読みました。最初に読んだのは200ページくらいの本でしたが、150ページあたりから理解できるようになりました」と言います。
2年間のボランティアを終えて帰国したシュリラさんは大学に戻りました。そして日本語の授業を選択して、文法や日本語の表現の裏にある文化を学びました。「文法の授業のおかげで、日本滞在中に得た知識を体系的なものにできました。また、文化の理解はとても重要です。例えば『お疲れ様です』というあいさつは日本特有のものだと思います。相手がたくさん働いたことへの感謝やその疲れを思いやる気持ちがこもっていることを理解すると、どういうときに使われるかわかります」。
シュリラさんは大学4年のとき、N1を受けて合格しました。そしてJETプログラムに応募して再来日しました。「前回の来日で日本人のまじめさや勤勉さにふれて、日本が好きになったからです」と言います。「日本で働いている間には、直属の上司に嫌がらせをされて困った時期もありましたが、さらに上の上司に相談して乗り越えま
した」。
今、シュリラさんは東京のマーケティング会社で働いています。「自国語と日本語、そして何かのスキル、例えばプログラミングができるなどの技能があれば、今の東京には仕事を得る機会がたくさんありますよ」と言います。「私は今、秋葉原の魅力を海外へ発信するプロジェクト『Around Akiba』に携わっています。特に取材のとき、日本語ができてよかったと感じますね」。

文:砂崎良

Leave a Reply