In Oman it’s also Customary to Remove Shoes in the Home

[From April Issue 2015]
[2015年4月号掲載記事]
201504-2-1
Wife of the Ambassador of Oman
Abeer A. AISHA
After sustaining damage in the Great East Japan Earthquake and going through the disaster of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, in March 2011 a manufacturer in Fukushima Prefecture received an order worth 2.6 billion yen for water purifiers. The order came with a message: “You can use the water purifiers in areas affected by the disaster before delivery.” “It was the least support our country could offer to our friends in Japan,” says Abeer A. AISHA, wife of the Ambassador of Oman, modestly.
Mrs. Aisha arrived in Japan in January 2008. “My husband visited Japan in 1994 and had a homestay experience with a Japanese family. He was treated very well by his host family, almost like a real son. I’d also heard from my acquaintances that Japanese people were very kind. Our daughter got very ill during the flight to Japan, so she went straight to a hospital upon arrival. She was very well taken care of, so well that it made me understand just how good Japanese people are.”
Japan is the first country she’d been posted to as an ambassador’s wife. “I like casual socializing; formal situations aren’t my cup of tea. So I was very nervous when we paid a visit to the Imperial Palace,” she says. “When the Empress spoke to us, she was quite friendly even though the meeting was rather formal. I was anxious, but she made me relax.”
Mrs. Aisha attends official ceremonies and is required to socialize and take part in activities not only with Japanese, but also with diplomats and ambassadors’ wives from other countries. “At first, I felt under pressure when people paid attention to me, my dress and my speech,” says Mrs. Aisha. “I got homesick because back home I always spend a lot of time with my parents and sisters.”

201504-2-2

City of Nizwa


“It was thanks to my work experience for a bank in Oman that I got over my homesickness,” says Mrs. Aisha. “I dealt with so many types of people, including fishermen, merchants and businessmen, that I became open as a person. We have many foreigners that work in our country, so the culture is international. That’s why I’ve learned to deal with people from different countries in a friendly and polite manner, I think. My husband and children and the friends I made in Japan cured my homesickness, and I ended up becoming a stronger person, as I kept saying to myself that it was all for my family and country.”
“My first concern about living in Japan was our children,” says Mrs. Aisha. “Before coming to Japan, we were posted in the UK for six months. Our children were 15, 13 and eight years old. We moved twice in such a short time that it must have been hard for them to get used to their new schools and make new friends. I was relieved they were fortunately transferred to good schools here in Japan and they adapted quite well.”
She had a hard time with the language and with food. As a Muslim, she consumes neither pork nor alcohol. “There were few expatriates in the area where we first lived. So supermarkets there had very few products with English labels. I didn’t know which ones to buy from those that didn’t have English on. My daughter and I once gave up and went home without buying anything,” she says.
“My daughter loved potato chips sold at the convenience stores, but once she learned enough Japanese at school to read the ingredients, she was disappointed to find out that some pork-derived ingredients were used. That said, Islam is a flexible religion, so it’s not a problem if you ate something without knowing,” says Mrs. Aisha. “We have no more problems now as our chef cooks for us at home and we have a few international stores with English labels near to the embassy. I myself have learned some Japanese phrases such as ‘I can’t eat pork,’” she laughs.
201504-2-3

Bahla Citadel


The punctuality of the Japanese and the fact that things are planned several months in advance were pleasant surprises for her. “Whenever we go home to Oman during summer holidays, our relatives suggest we stay longer. Everyone’s surprised when I tell them we have to return because we already have plans for September. I suppose Japanese punctuality comes from the fact that they were raised to respect and value the importance of time. The Japanese way of doing things is good for living comfortably,” she says.
Located in the southeastern part of the Arabian Peninsula, Oman is a country that has prospered from maritime trade since ancient times. A member of Oman’s royal family has Japanese blood and the country is well known for its friendliness towards Japanese. Historical buildings such as the Bahla and Nizwa Forts, the Royal Palace, and mosques are popular with tourists. Although the Middle East is a region unfamiliar to most Japanese, its resorts are well-known in Europe. Oman’s beaches are teeming with foreign tourists enjoying their vacations.
“Most Japanese must think Oman is a desert country,” says Mrs. Aisha. “Of course, our desert is enormous, but we also have beautiful beaches and oases. The climate in the mountains is good throughout the year and marvelous resorts are everywhere. It’s a stable and safe country security-wise, so please do come for sightseeing. Cherry trees presented by Japan blossom every February in Oman’s Jabal Akhdar. We also have Japanese gardens.”
“You can enjoy wonderful cuisine in Oman. As many traditional dishes use rice and fish, Japanese people will feel at home, I think. Besides, Oman is a country with lots of international influences. From Lebanese food, to Indian, to Southeast Asian, to Western, and to fast food, we have all kinds of restaurants where you can taste delicacies from both the sea and the land.”
201504-2-4

Frankincense


“Oman produces a fragrant resin called frankincense. The quality of Oman’s frankincense is the highest in the world and its trade has a very long history. Omanis not only burn it, but also chew it like chewing gum, drink it in liquid form and use it for skin care. Nowadays perfumes, body creams, and lotions are made from frankincense. Oman’s dates are also of very high quality.”
“The Omanis and the Japanese have a lot in common: our hospitality, respect for elders, and the way we take off our shoes before entering the home and sit on the floor. What’s more, Japanese wash their hands at the entrance when they go to a Shinto shrine, don’t they? That’s like us, too; we Muslims also wash our hands before praying,” says Mrs. Aisha. “Oman is a wonderful country. I’m sure tourists would return to visit again.”
Oman Embassy
Text: SAZAKI Ryo
Photos courtesy by KOSUGI Yurika[2015年4月号掲載記事]
201504-2-1
オマーン国大使夫人
アビール・アイシャさん
2011年3月、東日本大震災と原発事故で被災した福島県のメーカーが、総額約26億円もの浄水器の注文を受けました。しかも「完成した浄水器は納品前に被災地で使用してよい」という内容でした。「わが国が日本の友人たちに対してできる最小限の支援だったと思います」とアビール・アイシャ大使夫人は控えめに話します。
夫人は2008年1月に来日しました。「夫は1994年に来日し、2ヵ月間ホームステイしたことがあります。ホストファミリーには実の息子のようによくしていただきました。また知人たちからも、日本人は親切だと聞いていました。日本へのフライトで娘はひどく酔ってしまい、空港に着いてすぐに病院へ直行しました。そのときの手当てがすばらしくて、日本人がいい人たちだというのは本当だとわかりました」と言います。
夫人にとって日本は、大使夫人として赴任した初めての国です。「私は気さくなお付き合いが好きで、堅苦しい場が苦手です。ですから皇居を訪問したときにはとても緊張していました」と言います。「会合はフォーマルだったにもかかわらず、皇后さまはとても気さくに話しかけてくださいました。固くなっていた私もリラックスできました」。
大使夫人は公的なセレモニーにも出席しますし、日本人だけでなく、各国の外交官や大使夫人たちとの交際や活動に参加する必要もあります。「最初のころは私自身、服装、話し方まで注目されるのがプレッシャーでした」と夫人。「オマーンでは両親や姉妹と多くの時間を過ごしていたのでホームシックになりました」。
201504-2-2

ニズワの街


「乗り越えられたのは、オマーンで銀行に勤めていた経験のおかげです」と夫人は言います。「漁師や商人、ビジネスマンなどいろいろな人に心を開けるようになりました。わが国には外国人が多いので、文化が国際的です。おかげでいろいろな国の人に対して親しく、礼儀正しく接することができるようになりました。ホームシックは主人と子どもたち、そして日本でできた友達が癒してくれましたし、家族と国のためと思うと私も強くなれました」。
「日本で暮らすにあたって、まず心配だったのは子どもたちです」と夫人。「私たちは日本へ来る前、イギリスに6ヵ月間赴任していました。子どもたちは15歳、13歳、8歳でした。短期間に引越しが続き、学校に慣れるのも、友達をつくるのも大変だったと思います。幸い、いい学校に転入でき、うまくなじめたので安心しました」。
大変だったのは言葉と食べ物です。夫人はイスラム教徒なので豚肉とお酒を口にしません。「最初に住んだ地域には外国人がほとんどいませんでした。ですからスーパーには英語で表記された品物がほとんどなく、英語で書かれていないものはどれを買っていいかわかりませんでした。娘と二人で、結局あきらめて何も買わずに帰ったことがあります」と夫人は言います。
「娘はコンビニに売っているポテトチップスが大好きでしたが、学校で日本語を習って成分表示が読めるようになり、豚由来の材料が使われていることを知ってがっかりしていました。でもイスラム教はフレキシブルなので、知らずに食べたものは問題になりません」と夫人。「今は家でシェフが料理をしてくれますし、大使館付近には英語表記のある国際的な店がたくさんあるので大丈夫です。私も『豚肉はだめです』などの日本語を覚えました」と笑います。
201504-2-3

バハラ城塞


日本人が時間に正確なことや、予定が数ヵ月前から決まることは夫人にとって新鮮でした。「夏休みにオマーンへ帰ると、親戚がもっと泊っていきなさいと勧めます。もう9月に予定が入っているから帰らなければと言うとみんなが驚きますよ。日本人は時間の大切さを聞かされて育っているので、時間を守れるのでしょうね。日本の物事に対するすすめ方は、生活しやすくていいと感じます」と言います。
オマーンはアラビア半島の南東部にあり、古くから海上貿易で栄えてきた国です。王族の中には日本人の血を引く人もいて、とても親日的な国として知られています。ニズワやバハラ城の砦など歴史的な建造物や、王宮やモスクなどの建築が観光客に人気です。日本人にとって中東はまだなじみの薄い地域ですが、ヨーロッパでは夏のリゾート地として知られており、オマーンのビーチでも多くの外国人観光客が休暇を楽しんでいます。
「多くの日本人は、オマーンを砂漠の国だと思っているでしょう」と夫人。「もちろん我が国の砂漠は広大ですが、美しい海岸やオアシスもあります。山間部では年間を通じて気候がよくて、すばらしいリゾート地が各地にあります。治安もよく安定しているのでぜひ観光に来てください。日本から贈られた桜は毎年2月にオマーン・ジャベル・アフダールで咲きますし、日本庭園もありますよ」。
「オマーンではすばらしい食事を楽しめます。伝統的な料理には米を使ったものや魚料理がたくさんあるので、日本の方には親しみが持てると思いますよ。また、オマーンは国際的な国です。レバノン料理やインド料理、東南アジアや欧米の料理、ファストフード店まで、さまざまなスタイルの店があって海の幸と陸の幸の両方が味わえます」。
201504-2-4

乳香


「オマーンでは乳香という樹脂の香料が取れます。オマーン産の乳香は世界最高といわれる品質で、その貿易はとても長い歴史を持っています。オマーン人は乳香をたくだけでなく、ガムのようにかんだり、液体状にして飲んだり肌の手入れに使ったりもします。現在では乳香から香水、ハンドクリーム、ローションが作られていますよ。それにナツメヤシも、オマーン産のものはとても高品質です」。
「オマーン人と日本人には共通点がたくさんあります。おもてなしの精神や高齢者を尊敬する習慣、家の中に入る前に靴を脱ぐことや床に座ることも似ています。それに日本人は、神社へ行ったとき入口で手を洗いますね。イスラム教徒も礼拝の前には手を洗うので、似ていると感じます」と夫人。「オマーンはとてもすばらしい国で、観光客は必ずリピーターになりますよ」。
オマーン大使館
文:砂崎良
撮影協力:小杉ゆりか

Leave a Reply